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FREDERICK MORGAN GRUNDEN 



A Memorial Bibliography 



ST. LOUIS PUBLIC LIBRARY 
19 14 




FREDERICK MORGAN CRUNDEN 
from a photORraph taken in 1904. 



L 



FREDERICK MORGAN CRUNDEN 



A MEMORIAL BIBLIOGRAPHY 



EDITED BY 
ARTHUR E. BOSTWICK 




ST. LOUIS PUBLIC UBRARY 
1914 



K-l-' 



Thou art, O man, but half what Nature at thy birth 

Made thee, — and half what thou hast made thyself on earth. 

She laid the building-ground thou canst not change one jot; 

'Tis thine to build thereon a shapely house, or not. 

To that thou canst do naught,— with this hast all to do; 

Thou need'st not rust nor rest, with this great work in view. 

Rest not till thou hast made right what is wrong in thee, — 

And what is false and weak, made true and strong in thee. 

This cannot be too soon, nor yet too late begun; 

The making of a man 's a work that 's never done. 

RiicKERT: Wisdom of the Brahmin. 

A favorite quotation, used by Mr. Crunden in one of his addresses, 
to the Library staff. 



PREFACE 

In this little book are gathered tributes 
to Mr. Crunden from various sources, 
official and personal, together with a list of 
all his papers, articles and addresses, 
published or in manuscript, with a brief 
explanatory note about each. 



A. E. B. 



ST. LOUIS PUBLIC LIBRARY 
February. 1914 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Preface Page 1 

Tributes " 7 

Annotated list of Addresses and Papers " 33 

Index " 61 



UST OF ILLUSTRATIONS 



Portrait Frontispiece 

Portal of St. Louis Public Library, Showing In- 
scription Page 17 

Reduced Fac-simile Title-Page " 35 

Reduced Fac-simile Letter " 49 



TRIBUTES TO 
FREDERICK MORGAN CRUNDEN 



EXCERPT FROM THE ANNUAL REPORT OF 
THE ST. LOUIS PUBLIC LIBRARY, 1911- 
'12. 

On October 28, 1911, Frederick Morgan Crunden, 
former Librarian of this Library, passed away, after 
an illness of several years, at St. Luke's Hospital in 
this city. At a special meeting", held on that same 
day, the Board of Directors adopted the following 
resolutions : 

Resolved, That the Board of Directors of the Public Li- 
brary of the City of St. Louis, on the death of Frederick 
Morgan Crunden, the father of the Public Library, and for 
thirty-two years its Librarian, desires to record its grateful 
recognition of the great and disinterested part that he 
played in developing the Public Library System of this city 
and in placing it on the secure foundation where it stands 
today. 

A practical idealist, Mr. Crunden early recognized the im- 
portance and necessity of the free library as a means of 
advancing popular education; and his remarkable energy 
and perseverance, added to genius for the prosecution of 
the special kind of work to which he devoted his life, en- 
abled him to attain his ends in the face of discouragement 
and obstacles that might well have disheartened him. 
Forced to leave the life-work that he loved, at a time when 
his dearest wishes and dreams for it were on the point of 
realization, he retained, in the confinement and pain of years 
of illness, his affectionate interest in it and his hope and 
confidence for its future. His name, given to one of its 
most useful branches, and his words, fittingly carved over 
the portals of the new building where all may see them, will 
be perpetual reminders to the citizens of St. Louis of his 
unselfish devotion to them and of the_ effective labor in 
which he wore himself out in their service. 

9 



FREDERICK MORGAN CRUNDEN 

RESOLUTION ADOPTED BY THE AMERI- 
CAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION AT ITS 
ANNUAL CONFERENCE HELD IN OT- 
TAWA, CANADA, JUNE 26th— JULY 2d, 
1912. 

Frederick Morgan Crunden was born at Gravesend, Eng- 
land, Sept. 1, 1847, the son of Benjamin Robert and Mary 
(Morgan) Crunden. Coming to St. Louis while a child, he 
was educated in the public schools of that city and gradu- 
ated from its high school in 1865, with a scholarship in 
Washington University. In the latter institution he took a 
course in the arts and sciences, graduating in 1868 with the 
degree of Bachelor of Arts. Teaching in the public schools 
of St. Louis before graduation, and later in the college fac- 
ulty of the same university, he received the degree of Mas- 
ter of Arts in 1872. 

His marriage to Miss Kate Edmondson was in 1889. Dur- 
ing his college course, Mr. Crunden took a vital interest in 
library work, and in January, 1877, he became secretary and 
librarian of the St. Louis Public (then Public School) Li- 
brary, continuing as such until 1909. 

Equally identified with many other societies, local and 
national, he had been a contributor to leading magazines 
upon educational and sociological subjects and had attained 
international fame before he was stricken in 1906 with the 
malady which resulted in his death, Oct. 28, 1911. 

Mr. Crunden's public services were by no means confined 
to the distinctively library interests of his community and 
tlie country. He was particularly interested in the mutual 

10 



A MEMORIAL, BIBLIOGRAPHY 

relations of schools and libraries, developing them in St. 
Louis in a manner which served as a model for others, and 
contributing largely to the evolution of the present official 
relations of the National Education Association and the 
American Library Association. 

In his public writing he has expressed most clearly and 
happily the fundamental principles of these relations, and 
it is a great pleasure to his friends, as it was to him in the 
last days of his life, to know that his statement of the 
value of recorded thought has been carved in granite on 
the walls of his cherished institution. Nevertheless, it was 
to library work that the greater oart of his time and 
thought was given, and it is the success of his work as a 
constructive librarian that naturally we most fully recog- 
nize. He combined high executive ability with a compre- 
hensive knowledge of the contents of the collections under 
his charge. He had that sense of the real librarian which 
has been said to be "an intensive perception of the needs 
of the present, and a prophetic insight into the needs of the 
future.'' 

He worked zealously and unceasingly, first for the broad- 
ening of the work of the St. Louis public schools library, 
then for its conversion into a free public library, and fin- 
ally for its development into a strong institution, ranking 
among the great libraries of the land. It is pleasant to 
know that even in the last years he was able at times to 
follow its course along the lines forecast by him, and that 
he could realize the high appreciation of his services so gen- 
erallj' felt by his fellow citizens. 

Almost in the beginning of his library career he began 
also his services to the American Library Association, 
which were secondary only to the work he did for St. Louis. 

11 



FREDERICK MORGAN CRUNDEN 

He attended first the Boston conference in 1879, and rare- 
ly after that did he miss a meeting. Elected councillor in 
1882, he served the Association almost continuously until 
his illness. He was vice-president in 1887-1888, and under 
his presidency the Fabyans conference of 1890 took rank as 
the largest and one of the most successful meetings held up 
to that time. When the Association met at St. Louis in 
1889, and again in 1904, he was a most thoughtful host, 
whose care for our welfare contributed largely to the suc- 
cess of those meetings. He served also as one of the vice- 
presidents of the Chicago conference in 1893, and as vice- 
president of the international library conference at London 
in 1897, and was one of the chief spokesmen of the Asso- 
ciation party. This list of ofifices by no means measures 
the debt of the Association to him. The much longer list 
of committees on which he served would indicate better 
the character and breadth of his work, but even this would 
leave unexpressed the professional knowledge and the per- 
sonal pleasure gained from his companionship by the in- 
dividual members. 

This sense of personal loss must be felt by all who met 
him in the other library circles in which he was interested, 
especially the Missouri State Library Association, of which 
he was the first president, and the New York State Library 
Association, whose annual meetings he so often attended. 

No member of the A. L. A. of his day had a wider and 
closer personal acquaintance among the membership than 
Mr. Crunden. He had a spirit of friendliness and human 
sympathy which prompted him to take hold upon the 
hearts of those with whom he was brought into contact in 
his profession. He had no ambitions which inclined him 
to self-seeking, but was always quick to recognize the 
merits of others and to give acknowledgment freely and 

12 



A MEMORIAI. BIBUOGRAPHY 

heartily. He was naturally of a modest and retiring dis- 
position, but wholly without self-consciousness or reserve. 
He looked upon every question with frankness, unbiased 
by any considerations outside of its true merits as approved 
by his mature judgment. He held his views firmly, but he 
never undertook to force them upon others. His many fine 
qualities of mind and heart are a source of joy to all who 
recall the memory of him as he was in the midst of his 
long and brilliant career. His more intimate friends recall 
with wonder the patience with which he bore the strain of 
the 3'ears of ill health which preceeded the final breakdown, 
and remember with gratitude his gracious hospitality. 



13 



FREDERICK MORGAN CRUNDEN 

EXTRACT FROM THE LIBRARY JOURNAL, 
NOVEMBER, 1911, PAGES 569-'70. 

Frederick Morgan Crunden, librarian of the St. Louis 
Public Library for 33 years (1877-1909), died Saturday, Oc- 
tober 28, at 12:40 a. m., in St. Luke's Hospital, St. Louis, 
where he had been a patient for nearly five years. In 1906 
Mr. Crunden was first stricken with the malady which has 
resulted in his death. Though he has rallied several times, 
hope of entire recovery was long since given up by his phy- 
sicians and intimate associates. Mrs. Crunden, his wife 
and devoted nurse and companion during his long illness, 
survives him. For three years after his breakdown Mr. 
Crunden still held the position of librarian of the St. Louis 
Public Library, of which his resignation was not accepted 
until 1909, when Dr. Arthur E. Bostwick, of New York City, 
succeeded him. Mr. Crunden was born in Gravcsend, Eng- 
land, September 1, 1847, the son of Benjamin R. and Mary 
Crunden. Coming to St. Louis while a child, he was edu- 
cated in the public schools of the city and graduated from 
high school in 1865 with a Washington University scholar- 
ship. He took a course in the arts and sciences, receiving 
a degree of bachelor of arts in 1876. During his college 
course Mr. Crunden took a vital interest in library work, 
and in 1877 he was selected as secretary and librarian for 
the St. Louis Public Library, then a small and inefficiently 
housed collection of books the usage of which was subject 
to charge. To the realization and development of the pub- 
lic library system Mr. Crunden consecrated his life. He 
was accorded national recognition in 1889, when he was 
elected presidc-nt of the American Library Association. In 
1807 lie was made vice-i)residcnt of the International Li- 

14 



A MEMORIAL, BIBLIOGRAPHY 

brary Conference at London. He was a member of council 
of the American Library Association, of the American Li- 
brary Institute, the Missouri Historical Society, and had 
written many articles for leading magazines. 

At a special meeting of the library board on the day of 
his death, resolutions, as quoted below, were adopted, and 
it was ordered that all library buildings should be closed 
until 4 p. m. on the afternoon of the funeral. The flags in 
front of the unfinished library building were half-masted as 
soon as the news of Mr. Crunden's death reached the li- 
brary. 

The funeral was held in the Church of the Messiah (Uni- 
tarian) at Union and Von Versen Avenues, on Sunday, Oc- 
tober 29, at 3 p. m. Owing to the illness of the pastor. 
Rev. John W. Day, the services were conducted by Rev. 
George R. Dodson, of the Church of the Unity. 

The honorary pallbearers were George R. Carpenter, John 
F. Lee, William Maffitt, Hon. O'Neill Ryan, Joseph H. 
Zumbalen, J. Lawrence Mauran and H. N. Davis, all mem- 
bers of the library board; Dr. Arthur E. Bostwick, the li- 
brarian, and Dr. Clement W. Andrews, of the John Crerar 
Library, Chicago. The active pallbearers, chosen from 
the sl3.fi of the public library, were Paul Blackwelder, An- 
drew Linn Bostwick, Jesse Cunningham, Leonard Balz, 
John L. Parker and Albert Diephuis. 

The church was filled with a congregation of representa- 
tive St. Louisans. Flowers, which were numerous and 
beautiful, included a huge sheaf of white chrysanthemums 
from the library board and a large wreath and an open 
book of carnations from members of the library staff. 

[The resolutions adopted by the board are given in full 
on page 9.] 

It was a curious coincidence that almost exactly as the 

15 



FREDERICK MORGAN CRUNDEN 

news of Mr. Crunden's death and the order for half-masting 
the flags reached the new library building, the workman de- 
tailed to cut the inscription on the pediment was just put- 
ting his chisel into the first word of the excerpts from Mr. 
Crunden's addresses, which are to be placed there. 

This inscription reads as follows: 

The Public Ltbro'ry of the City of St. Louis. Re- 
corded thought is our chief heritage from the past, the 
most lasting legacy we can leave to the future. Books 
are the most enduring monument of man's achievements. 
Only through hooks can civilization become cumulative. 
Frederick M. Crunden. 



16 



'I i 







a- 



A MEJMORIAI, BIBLIOGRAPHY 

EDITORIAL IN THE LIBRARY JOURNAL, 
NOVEMBER, 1911, PAGE 541. 

The death of Frederick M. Crunden closes a pathetic 
postscript to a vigorous and effective life. Mr. Crunden rose 
to a proud position in the library world because of his alert 
mind, administrative power, wide outlook, and far fore- 
sight, and at the time of his death he was the senior living 
ex-president of the A. L. A. Melvil Dewey, now the senior 
living cx-president, has sent fitting tribute to his predeces- 
sor, which we print elsewhere. Mr. Crunden developed for 
St. Louis a creditable public library system before either 
New York or Brooklyn had reached equal development, and 
he made his library one of the radiating centres of library 
progress and influence. He was at the height of his own 
power and influence, and had just been recognized as a pow- 
er in the state by his appointment as a commissioner to re- 
vise methods of taxation in Missouri, when as the result of 
nervous overstrain on the eve of his departure for a rest in 
Europe, the blow suddenly came, which sundered him from 
his work though never from the esteem and affection of the 
library profession. More than once he nearly recovered, 
and he had the satisfaction of again being himself when the 
plans for the new St. Louis Public Library building were 
finally approved. Pathetically, from time to time, it was 
evident that recovery was not complete, and the sense that 
he could never regain full powers mitigates his death. His 
colleagues had a special affection for his generous and affec- 
tionate personality, and they will long mourn his loss. 



19 



FREDERICK MORGAN CRUNDEN 

EDITORIAL FROM PUBLIC LIBRARIES, DE- 
CEMBER, 1911, PAGES 436-'7. 
THE PASSING OF FREDERICK M. CRUNDEN. 

To few librarians has it been given to see so nearly the 
fulfillment of the plans of their life work as was the case 
with the late Frederick M. Crunden. for many years librarian 
of the St. Louis public library. 

He took up the public library service after coming to the 
full of his intellectual powers, in a community where a life 
of scholarly and artistic pursuit from his earliest youth had 
given him a leadership in the literary and educational circles 
of the place, where his amiable disposition, his adaptability 
and the courage of his convictions had already won for him 
not only personal regard, but a belief in and assistance for 
his plans of social betterment. 

His faith in the power of the public library as the chief 
instiumcnt in the education of the people was a powerful 
influence in the development of a similar spirit among the 
strong members of the community in which he lived and 
rarely did he fail in winning moral and financial support 
from those in authority to carry out his wishes and plans 
for the St. Louis public library. It is today in all its splen- 
did equipment, in its plan of high power and fine regard 
among the people of that city his most eloquent monu- 
ment. He lived long enough to witness an expression of 
regard on the part of the library authorities and of the gen- 
eral public, spoken freely, printed large and carved in 
stone. Then he died. Where is there room for regret 
save naturally in the lives of those who will miss that rare 
companionship and sympathetic interest which were so 
freely given to tliose whom he loved? 

20 



A MEMORIAL, BIBLIOGRAPHY 

Mr. Crunden's contribution to library development has 
not been confined to his own city. "Every man is a debt- 
or to his profession" was a frequent remark in his public 
speech and he lived up to his creed. He gave fully and 
freely of his talent and influence to the general advance- 
ment of the library movement everywhere. After Melvil 
Dewey, with whom he was a close and steadfast friend to 
the last, he was, perhaps, the best known American, per- 
sonally and professionally, to British librarians and an ap- 
preciated contributor to the library literature of England, 
before he was stricken. The American library institute was 
a favorite idea of his for years before it was carried into 
effect, the American library association was always the re- 
cipient of his most loyal devotion and efforts, the various 
state associations were always his care and delight, the li- 
brary department of the N. E. A. received his constant 
help and attention, and no worthy library movement any- 
where but was always sure of his help. He allowed no 
gathering of thoughtful people to meet within his circle 
of influence without effectively bringing to their notice the 
help which libraries might render their cause, and his own 
library justified his theories. He preached, and he prac- 
ticed what he preached. Harvests from his seed-sowing 
will be garnered for long years to come. 

Public Libraries owes much to his friendship and sup- 
port. His wise counsel was a tower of strength to the 
periodical in its early years, and his sympathy and loyalty 
to its principles have been valuable aids always. 

No inexperienced or perplexed librarian ever went to 
him for advice or sympathy but came away strengthened 
and encouraged, even though he may have pointed out their 
delinquencies. 

Thinking of his creed, one can say truthfully of Mr. 
Crunden, he paid the fullest of his debt to his profession. 

21 



FREDERICK MORGAN CRUNDEN 

TRIBUTE FROM DR. MELVIL DEWEY, COM- 
MUNICATED TO THE LIBRARY JOUR- 
NAL, NOVEMBER, 1911, PAGE 570. 

Perhaps no man in the history of the A. L. A. has had 
more or warmer personal friends than our senior ex-pres- 
ident. For more than a quarter century he gave his life 
with rare unselfishness to the work he had chosen as most 
helpful to his fellows. 

The old proverb that a prophet is not without honor save 
in his own country broke down with him, for St. Louis has 
from first to last been proud to record on all occasions its 
appreciation of a favorite son, who had done more perhaps 
than any other single man to make life better worth living 
for great numbers of its population. The inscription, which 
is a quotation from one of his addresses, and which the 
trustees have decided to carve in granite over the main en- 
trance to the magnificent new building, a paragraph from 
one of Mr. Crunden's library addresses before the Round 
Table Club of St. Louis 27 years ago, is significant as stand- 
ing for what he said at the beginning of his active library 
career, and which so fully expressed what he would say at 
the end. It sums up the gist of many volumes and many 
addresses expressing our highest ideals of our calling. On 
the same building is carved another inscription from the 
greatest library giver of all history, a fit recognition of 
Mr. Carnegie's gift. Below the two inscriptions might well 
be carved: "One gave a million dollars, the other gave his 
life.'' The work of Frederick M. Crunden and this palace 
of books, its fitting monument, will always be an inspira- 
tion to every librarian, young or old, who has in his heart 

22 



A MEMORIAL, BIBLIOGRAPHY 

that unselfish spirit which guided all of F. M. Crunden's 
life and without which no librarian can ever do the best 
and highest type of work. 

September 20, 1911. M. D. 



23 



FREDERICK MORGAN CRUNDEN 

LETTER FROM DR. MELVIL DEWEY TO 
PUBLIC LIBRARinS, DECEMBER, 1911, 
PAGES 437-'8. 

A little after we founded the A. L. A. in 1876, there 
came to us from St. Louis the brain and big heart that won 
instant recognition and enduring leadership. For years he 
has been our senior living ex-president. For a third of a 
century I have worked intimately with the rare man who 
has just left us. We have discussed a thousand matters but 
never once have I heard from his lips an argument or 
suggestion based on selfishness. His thought was ever 
the greatest good of the greatest number and for that he 
was always ready to sacrifice his own interests in a way 
sadly rare in these days of self-seeking. Those who shared 
his friendship are better men and women; the A. L. A. is 
stronger and has higher ideals; and a good bit of the 
Master's vineyard is a better world to live in because of 
the influence of his earnest life. 

After the awful blow fell and he went out of our lives 
withou'; a moment's warning, we who loved and admired 
him, and that meant all that had the rare privilege of his 
friendsh-p, hoped against hope that he might come back 
to us. After five weary heart-breaking years there was a 
rift in the black clouds as if he had been permitted to re- 
turn to earth Ir.ng enough to see with mortal eyes some of 
the wonderful fruitage from the seed his hand had planted. 

He saw the beautiful F. M. Crunden branch library, a 
conspicuous I'jj-.der among similar institutions because of 
services to all the people, unusual even for the best of 
these Peopl-i's Colleges. He saw the great central build- 

24 



A MEMORIAL, BIBUOGRAPHY 

ing, the crowning movement of his long life work, the 
special pride of the St. Louis for which he did so much. 

He saw carved in granite above the main entrance of this 
temple a motto chosen by a wise committee from the whole 
field of literature, a telling extract from one of his own 
many addresses. 

He saw a whole great city loyal still to the memory of 
the man whose life had made that city a better home. 

It was not for him to remain through the harvest that 
came from his planting, but like Moses, he had his brief 
space on the mountain top and at last his eyes swept over 
the promised land to which he had so strenuously led his 
people. Then after this brief inspiring vision his great 
heart swelled out in a prayer that was quickly answered, 
"Now, Lord, lettest thou thy servant depart in peace, for 
mine eyes have seen the growing fruit of all my labors." 

Dewey. 



25 



FREDERICK MORGAN CRUNDEN 

EXTRACT FROM THE ADDRESS OF DR. 
HERBERT PUTNAM, LIBRARIAN OF 
CONGRESS, DELIVERED AT THE FOR- 
MAL OPENING OF THE NEW CENTRAL 
BUILDING, JAN. 6, 1912. 

As a librarian I rejoice also that the institution for which 
this building provides will permanently memorialize another 
name — of one who gave to it another sort of wealth — the 
wealth of patient, passionate, personal, public service. Of 
such a service as his, memorials are rare — or rarely visible: 
for the task of an administrator is to merge himself in his 
work; and his success as an administrator will in a way be 
proportioned to the success of his efTort to do so. He is 
endeavoring to shape something larger than himself and 
more lasting: to embody an ideal which he does not pos- 
sess, but which possesses him. If he succeeds — in propor- 
tion as he succeeds — his own personality, his own identity, 
will be lost in that which it has created. 

But if this must in the nature of institutions be so, it is 
humanly and professionally speaking unfortunate: for it de- 
prives the community and the profession of the example 
and the stimulus of a life which is itself a lesson. And it 
must be a deep satisfaction to us librarians, that in gather- 
ing here to declare the future of this institution you insist 
upon recalling and paying tribute to the wise, open, gentle, 
persevering, unselfish spirit whose devotion has gone into 
its past. 



26 



A MEMORIAL BIBLIOGRAPHY 

ADDRESS MADE BY JOHN F. LEE. ESQ., 
CHAIRMAN OF THE BUILDING COM- 
MITTEE, AT THE FORMAL OPENING OF 
THE NEW CENTRAL BUILDING, JAN. 6, 
1912. 



Mr. Chairman, Ladies and Gentlemen: The eloquent 
and well deserved tribute our Congressional Librarian, who 
may justly be regarded as the head of his profession in this 
country, has paid to the life and labors of Frederick M. 
Crunden, has been received by this audience with hearty 
and grateful approval. 

This is not the occasion to speak of everything that Mr. 
Crunden achieved, or to attempt a full appreciation of his 
life and lofty character; but I believe it is eminently proper 
that one who for years was the daily witness of his life, and 
his labors — his endeavors to give to the city all the benefits 
which flow from a well conducted library, and to place that 
library in a suitable building, should be added to what Mr. 
Putnam has so well said. 

Mr. Crunden was appointed Librarian of the Public 
School Library of this city in 1877. That library had few 
books and a very small membership. It was not a free li- 
brary, for it charged its members for the use of its books, 
and the sums so received, with the small amount paid over 
to it from time to time from the public school fund, con- 
stituted all it had for its support. 

It was scarcely a library in more than the name, and it 
was not a public library at all. 

27 



FREDERICK MORGAN CRUNDEN 

All the great changes which have since taken place have 
followed the initiative of Mr. Crunden. 

For many years the progress was slow; at times it halted 
altogether, but he was ideally formed for the task which he 
had assumed. He was capable of great labor; he loved his 
work and he gave himself to it without limit. His talents 
were of a high order and the range of his learning was 
wide. 

His nature was gentle and loving, but where principle 
was involved he was inflexible. He had no rancor; he was 
not embittered by opposition, or even by defeat, but he 
considered defeat only as another reason for another effort 
in another direction. 

So deep was his sincerity and so strong the belief he 
held as to the uses of a public library, that many a man has 
been led to his support because of his sympathy with Mr, 
Crunden. 

When he began his library work it was not the senti- 
ment of a majority of our citizens that a library filled a 
public want or met a public duty. He set himself to work 
to build up the sentiment in its favor, which is so over- 
whelming today. 

He started the project of divorcing the public library 
from the public school and giving to the library a govern- 
ing board of its own. He first suggested the application to 
Mr. Carnegie, which resulted in that philanthropist's con- 
tributing nearly one-third of the cost of this building, and 
the total cost of all of our branch libraries in operation to- 
day. He first advocated the levying of the tax by which 
St. Louis now supports her libraries, and when the site upon 
which we now are was covered with the Exposition Build- 
ing, then successfully conducted, he announced this as the 
place where at some future day this great Central Library 
building would be placed. 

28 



A MEMORIAI, BIBUOGRAPHY 

In fact, during the more than thirty-two years for which 
he was librarian, he was the life, the soul and center of 
every great advance it made. 

When the time came to prepare for the erection of this 
building and to determine what it ought to be, the board 
applied to him to report as to the Library's requirements. 
His report was submitted and accepted. 

Very shortly after, Mr. Crunden's illness came upon him 
and for a time the light of his mind went out. 

Then a year passed during which arrangements were per- 
fected for the competition among the architects, plans were 
handed in and the time to choose between the plans arrived. 
The nature of his illness had baffled the skill of the ablest 
physicians, and none of them had held out any hope that 
his condition would ever be better than it was. Yet, as 
the time for deciding upon the plans arrived, he grew 
stronger, his mind cleared, and upon the day the award was 
to be made, he came back to his old office, his intellect as 
clear as ever it had been. 

I shall never forget the eager interest with which he 
went from plan to plan as the plans hung upon the wall, 
and when he came to that in which the genius of Cass Gil- 
bert had realized more than his fondest hopes, he gazed 
upon it with face enraptured. A few days later he left the 
city for the summer and later we were told that he was not 
so well. The illness came upon him again; the darkness 
descended, and for nearly three years his mind was a blank. 

This building at that time had been completed save for a 
few points of interior finish, when it was announced that 
Mr. Crunden was growing better a second time. Again the 
cloud lifted and he was able to appreciate what had been 

29 



FREDERICK MORGAN CRUNDEN 

done during his illness and to rejoice at it, for he saw that 
St. Louis had a great library building, with six branches 
scattered over the city, supported by an ample tax. 

In other words, the dream that he had dreamed more 
than a third of a century had come at last. 

It was not ordained that he should enter into the prom- 
ised land. He was never within these walls. He was called 
to his reward when his work was done, but he fell in the 
hour of victory. 

The Board of Directors of the Library, sharing the senti- 
ment of the people of St. Louis in regard to his services, 
has placed over the door of this building, carved in imper- 
ishable granite above his name, words from his writings 
expressing the purposes for which it was erected — not only 
for the beauty of the language, not only for the truth which 
it expressed, but also that it should for ages to come be, as 
far as is permitted, his monument — memorial of his love 
and services for his fellow men. 



30 



A MEMORIAL, BIBLIOGRAPHY 

CONTRIBUTED TO PUBLIC LIBRARIES, 
MARCH, 1910, PAGE 105. 

O friend of many dear remembered hours, 
Rich with a rare simplicity whose powers 
Strengthened your days for deeds of noble use; 
Would that your journey to the other life 
Unmixed with pain, unmarred of mental strife, 
Were rid of this sad lingering abuse. 
Loved by a people for the work you've done, 
Honored and praised for signal victory won. 
Oh! gentlest, kindest, tenderest and best. 
Thy memory will live on in every heart 
That knew j^our virtues and the noble part 
That marked your service clear above the rest. 
When, in the dawning of another life 
You have forgot the cloud, the pain, the strife, 
Heaven will make plain the meaning of this test. 

W. M. Chauvenet. 
St. Louis, Mo., November, 1909. 



31 



AN ANNOTATED LIST 

OF MR. CRUNDEN'S 

ADDRESSES AND PAPERS 



THE 



FUNCTION OF A PUBLIC LIBRARY 



VALUE TO A COMMUNITY. 



A PAPER READ BEFORE "THE ROUND TABLE, 
AT ST. LOUIS CLUB, SATURDAY, NOV. S. 1SS4. 



BY 

FREDERICK M. CRUNDEN. 



ST. LOUIS: 
XIXOX JONES PRINTING CO. 

18S4. 



Reduced fac-simile of the title-page of the paper described on page 37- 



ADDRESSES AND PAPERS IN SEPARATE 
FORM. 

1884. 

Function of a public library and its value to a 
community; paper read before the Round 
Table at St. Louis Club, Nov. 8, 1884. 

Treats the subject under the following heads: 

The Inception of the Modern Free Public Library Move- 
ment; What is the Function of a Public Library and of 
what Value is it to a Community?; The Results of Indus- 
trial Education: An Admirable School of Manners. Mr. 
Crunden states in this address that when he began to write 
it he still believed that a fee should be required of library- 
users "as an evidence of serious purpose", but that before 
he had finished it, he saw clearly that the free public li- 
brary is the only form in which the institution "can real- 
ize its potentialities." 

This address includes the substance of the words that 
have been carved on the pediment of the new Central Li- 
brary Building at St. Louis. They read here: — 

"Recorded thought is our chief heritage from the past, 
and the most lasting legacy we can leave to the future. 
Books are the most enduring monuments of man's achieve- 
ments; through them alone we knozv the lives and labors of 
our forefathers; through them alone can we transmit to future 
ages the activities of to-day; only through them can civiliza- 
tion become cumulative. 

The passage has been condensed for use in the inscrip- 

37 



FREDERICK MORGAN CRUNDEN 

tion by omitting the italicized words and substituting 
"books" for "them" in the last line. 

1893. 
The eree public library, its uses and value; a 

PAPER READ BEFORE THE ST. LoUIS COMMERCIAL 

Club, Feb. 18th, 1893. 

Reprint from The Western Daily Mercury, May 22d, 1893, giving notes 
on the above speech with extracts. 

Historical sketch of libraries with an appreciation of their 
value to the community, together with facts concerning the 
St. Louis Public Library and arguments for making it en- 
tirely free. Urges that the influence and co-operation of 
the Club be exerted to this end. "In one respect St. Louis 
. . . is burdened with a serious drawback to her rating 
among the great cities of the Union." Largely as a result 
of Mr. Crunden's efforts, as shown in such addresses as 
this, the Library was made free and the "serious draw- 
back" thereby removed, in 1893. 

1896. 

Philosophy oe the single tax; objections an- 
swered. 

Reprinted from The New Christian Quarterly, Jan., 1896. 

A reply to an article in T/ie Presbyterian Quarterly entitled 
"The Single Tax on Land" by Rev. Dr. Quarles. Asserts 
that this author "misconceives and misstates the theory of 
the single tax," and advocates that theory as generally up- 
held. 

38 



A MEMORIAL BIBLIOGRAPHY 
1897. 

What of the future?; address delivered at a 
public meeting oe the american library 
Association, June 22, 1897. 

Reprinted from Proceedings of the A. L. A., June 21-25, 1897. 

Asserts that society makes progress both by the path of 
individualism and by that of collectivism, which "run par- 
allel." Urges thoughtful study of social problems, and 
predicts that the public library is destined to play an im- 
portant part in their solution. 

1897. 

Books and text-books : the library as a factor 
IN education; a paper read before the In- 
ternational Library Conference, Lond., 
1897. 

Also read before the Normal School, Emporia, Kan., Nov. S, 1903, with 
introduction. 

Reprinted from St. Louis Public Library Magazine, Dec. 1897. 
Also 1 typewritten copy. 

Discusses the meaning of "success,"' the possibility of 
"complete living" and the contribution of education to the 
possibility of both. The respective values of the formal 
and accidental elements of education are compared and the 
latter is emphasized, thus exalting "books" above "text- 
books." Quotations from Sir John Lubbock, Prof. Mac- 
kenzie, Edward Thring and others support this view. The 
article concludes with a plea for the Library as the "Peo- 
ple's University". 

39 



IfREDERICK MORGAN CRUND^N 

1900-1901. 
How THINGS ARE DONE IN ONE AMERICAN UBRARY. 

Reprinted from The Library, ser. 2, v. i, 1900, pages 92-100, 147-152, 
290-298, 384-406, V. 2, 1901, Pages 20-43. 

A series of articles describing in some detail, the work 
of the St. Louis Public Library. The installments are en- 
titled L The New Novel Problem and its Solution. 

IL Board and Staff Organization and Finances. 
in. Selection, Purchase and Cataloguing of Books. 
IV. Registration and Circulation. 

V. Juvenile Department; Reference and Art Room; 
Reading Room; Delivery Stations and Depositories; Bind- 
ing; Books withdrawn from Circulation; Taking the Inven- 
tory; Exchanges and Donations; Pamphlets; Reading Lists, 
General and Special; A Solution for a Vexing Problem; To 
What End? 

1900. 
Libraries as a source of inspiration. 

Delivered at the 38th University Convocation of the State of N. Y., 
June 26, 1900. 

Printed in the Regents' Bulletin of the Univ. of the State of N. Y., 
No. SI, October, 1900. 

I printed single copy. 

Urges the value of a taste for good reading in elementary 
education and quotes at some length, in support of this 
view, from an address by President Eliot. Uses some of 
the material given in the Round Table address (see above) 
including the passage quoted as the source of the pediment 
inscription. 

40 



A MEMORIAI, BIBUOGRAPHY 

1901. 

The school and the library; the value of liter- 
ature IN EARLY EDUCATION. 

Reprinted from the Proceedings of the National Educational Associa- 
tion, 1901. 

A presentation of the value of literature in education and 
the benefits to be derived from the co-operation of school 
and library. Describes what has been done in St. Louis 
toward this end and quotes answers to a set of questions re- 
garding its value, sent out to teachers in the schools of 
that city. 

1902. 

Address [at laying oe the corner-stone of the 
library building^ washington university, 
St. Louis, Aug. 30, 1902.] 

Discusses the "reciprocal benefits gained" by the "union 
of forces between University and Exposition," in the erec- 
tion of a building to serve the purposes of both. "One is 
to spread the name and fame of St. Louis throughout the 
civilized world: the other will stand for all time as evidence 
of the fact that citizens of St. Louis have higher aims than 
the acquisition of wealth and the enjoyment of luxury." 

1903. 

The public LIBRARY A PAVING INVESTMENT. 
Article in The Outlook, v. 73, No. 9, February 28, 1903, Pages 494-.J99. 

Gives samples of replies returned by school principals to 

41 



FREDERICK MORGAN CRUNDEN 

three questions asked regarding the results of the use of 
sets of books (30 titles each) sent for supplementary read- 
ing by the St. Louis Public Library. Recapitulates the 
benefits of a public library and quotes Andrew Carnegie, 
President Harper, James Sully, William T. Harris, Pres- 
ident Eliot, G. Stanley Hall and Wm. E. Channing. As- 
serts that "there is no institution so intimately, so univer- 
sally, so constantly connected with the life of the people as 
tlie free public library." 

1903. 
The Louisiana Purchase Exposition. 

Article printed in The American Review of Reviews, May, 1903, v. 27, 
No. s. 

Also I typewritten copy. 

A prospectus of the exposition, telling visitors what they 
had before them. Its terms must have seemed somewhat 
extravagant at the time, but they were justified by the event 
and read soberly enough now. 

1904. 
The library: a plea eor its recognition. 

Chairman's address delivered at Library Section of International Con- 
gress of Arts and Sciences, St. Louis, Sept. 22, 1904. Printed in 
The Library Journal, v. 20, No. 12, Dec, 1904. 

Also I typewritten copy. 

All human progress depends on education, and the library 
is an essential factor in every grade. Takes up the func- 
tion of the library respectively in University, secondary 
and elementary education, and as a People's University; 
and summarizes these in conclusion, in ten numbered para- 
graphs. 

42 



A MEMORIAL BIBLIOGRAPHY 
1905. 

The public library as a factor in industrial 
progress. 

Article printed in The ExponeMt, v. 2, No. 2, Nov., 1905, pages 8-9. Con- 
tains portrait. 

Also printed in The Library, new ser., v. 7, Oct., 1906, pages 384-396. 

Includes a list of books on the productive and mechanic 
arts added to the St. Louis Public Library during three 
years previous, with the number of times each was issued 
in a specified period. Summarizes under seven heads "what 
a public library does for the community that supports it" 
and asserts that it "includes potentially all other means of 
social amelioration." 

1906. 

The public library as a factor in civic improve- 
ment. 

Article printed in The Chautauquan, v. 43, No. 4, June 1906, pages 335- 
344- 
2 typewritten copies. 

Gives a striking pen picture of the appearance and activ- 
ities of the ideal public library, drawn evidently from the 
writer's hopes and ideas regarding the new St. Louis build- 
ing and corresponding in many respects with its realiza- 
tion. Sketches the civic service that a library may render 
by fostering general education, love for beauty, and the 
creation of healthy public sentiment. It is asserted that 
the library is an important factor in civic improvement be- 
cause "it represents not the repressive or coercive side of 
government but the educative, the beneficent, the philan- 
thropic function of community life." 

43 



FREDERICK MORGAN CRUNDEN 

LIST OF ARTICLES CONTRIBUTED TO 
PERIODICALS. 

1879. 

A self-supporting collection of duplicate books in demand. 
Library Journal. 4:10-11. Jan., 1879. 

The first description of the so-called pay-duplicate sys- 
tem in public libraries, often called, from its place of 
origin, "the St. Louis plan." 

1880. 

Duplicates. Library Journal. 5:276-277. Sept.-Oct., 1880. 

A letter to the editor concerning a clearing-house for 
duplicates. 

1886. 

Report on aids and guides. Library Journal. 11:309-330. 
Aug.-Sept, 1886. 

Read at the Milwaukee Conference of the A. L. A., 1886. 
Embodies returns from 108 libraries, covering the period 
from August, 1883 to June 1885. 

1886. 

Some thoughts on classification; [a poem.]. Library 
Journal. 11:418. Oct., 188(5. 

Written to the tune of the Lord Chancellor's song in 
Sullivan's "lolanthe". 

44 



A MEMORIAIv BIBLIOGRAPHY 

1886. 

[European library contrivances; a letter to the ed.] Li- 
brary Journal. 11:454-555. Nov., 1886. 

1887. 

Business methods in library management. Library Jour- 
nal. 12:335-338. Sept.-Oct., 1887. 

Read at the Thousand Islands Conference of the A. L. 
A., in 1887. "The duties of a chief executive of a library 
differ in no essential from those of a manager of a stock 
company carrying on a commercial enterprise," 

1888. 

Issue of fiction, Jan. -Feb., 1888. Library Journal. 13:91. 
Mar.-Apr., 1888. 

Two lists, with brief comment, showing the issue of pop- 
ular novels in the St. Louis Public School Library. 

1888. 

Reading by school children and college students. Li- 
brary Journal. 13:89. Mar.-Apr., 1888. 

Brief remarks before the Study Committee of the St. 
Louis School Board. 

1889. 

Report on periodicals. Library Journal. 14:254-256. May- 
June, 1889. 

Statistics from 92 libraries, regarding the circulation and 
reference use of magazines, both single copies and bound 
volumes. 

45 



r^REDlBRICK MORGAN CRUNDEN 

1889. 

The Public Library. St Louis Republic. Oct. 28, 1899. 

Reprinted in the Library Journal 14:481-482. Dec, 1889. 
Interview giving reasons for making the Library free. 

1890. 

The value of a free library. Library Journal. 15:79-81. 
March, 1890. 

Excerpt from the Annual Report, 1889. 

1890. 

The library as a factor in the intellectual life of St. Louis. 
Library Journal. 15:138-139. May, 1890. 
Excerpt from the Annual Report, 1889. 

1890. 
Library reports. Library Journal. 15:198-200. July, 1890. 
A plea for the standardization of statistics and their ar- 
rangement. 

1890. 

Address of the president, F. M. Crunden, [at the A. L. A., 
Conference, Fabyans, N. H., 1890.] Library Journal. 15: 
Cl-5. Dec, 1890. 

Largely a discussion of the Association itself — its aims, 
its administration and its future. 

1891. 

The humor of book titles. Library Journal. 16:75 March, 
1891. 

Mistakes made in the titles of books, noted in libraries 
and book stores. 

46 



A MEMORIAI, BIBLIOGRAPHY 

1891. 

The most popular books. Library Journal. 16:277-278. 
Sept., 1891. 

An interview in which special emphasis is laid on changes 
in the popular taste or interest since 1882. 



1892. 

[Argument for making the St. L. P. L. a free library.] 
Library Journal. 17:108. March, 1892. 

Abstract of meeting of the St. Louis Board of Education, 
Feb. 9, 1892, at which the proposal to make the Public Li- 
brary free was put forward; including a plea in favor of the 
plan by the Librarian. 

1892. 

Increase of dues [to the A. L. A.] Library Journal. 
17:C37. Aug., 1892. 
Discussion at the Lakewood Conference. 



1892. 

Library progress. Library Journal. 17:C43. Aug., 1892. 
Impromptu remarks at the Lakewood Conference; per- 
sonal experiences and illustrative anecdotes. 



1893. 

Executive department, general supervision, including 
buildings, finances, etc., [of libraries.] Library Journal. IS: 
232-234. July, 1893. 

Abstract of a paper read at the Chicago Conference of 

47 



FREDERICK MORGAN CRUNDEN 

1893. "The executive department necessarily includes, to 
some extent, all points of library management." 

1893. 

Closing a library for stock-taking. Library Journal. 18: 
C37-38. Sept., 1893. 

Discussion at the Chicago meeting of the A. L. A. 

1893. 

[The librarian and the teacher.] Library Journal. 18: 
C36-37. Sept., 1893. 

Discussion at the Chicago meeting of the A. L. A. 

1894. 

The librarian as administrator. Library Journal. 19:44-47. 
Feb., 1894. 

Read at the Congress of Librarians, Chicago, July 12, 
1893. Advocates the keeping in touch, by a librarian, with 
the activities of his community. 

1894. 

The outcome of a course in economics given in the St. 
Louis Public Library. Library Journal. 19:Cl50. Dec. 1894. 

Part of a discussion at the Lake Placid Conference on 
"Public Libraries and University Extension." 

1894. 

Poole memorial fund. Library Journal. 19:Cl72. Dec, 
1894. 

Report of a committee at the Lake Placid Conference. 

48 



v.oiic Xlbrarg ^aoa3inc, / ^ 

»f.O0 Pen YC«R. P6ST P»IO. / 

St. Xoule, , /^W d 189 




fQjLp^yy^^^-^^Q^'-^'-'^ • 



^"^ - Jk^^ 











^1 






JhJl(L^^^^ nr^<^, C.^— •^. 



^ V li^/^'^-^-- 









rv^x^^^-^H '^^^^^"^'^^^^^^^^(iQ^^Uc^-'^--^' 



Reduced fac-simile of a letter from Frederick M. Crunden to Melvil Dewey. 



A MEMORIAL BIBLIOGRAPHY 

1894. 

Selection of books. Library Journal. 19:C41-42. Dec, 
1894. 

Describes the methods used by the writer in the St. 
Louis Public Library. 

1894. 

Supplying of current daily newspapers in free library read- 
ing-rooms. Library Journal. 19:C46-47. Dec, 1894. 

Objects to expending large sums for newspapers, but ap- 
proves the preservation, by binding, of selected journals. 

1896. 

A. L. A. catalog supplement: Sociology. Library Journal. 
21:Cl34-135. Dec, 1896. 

Part of a discussion, at the Cleveland Conference, of the 
books to be included in the first A. L. A. Catalogue supple- 
ment. 

1896. 

The functions of library trustees and their relations to 
librarians. Library Journal. 21:C32-37. Dec, 1896. 
Same. Public Libraries. Oct., 1896. 
Claims large liberty for the librarian. 

1897. 

Work between libraries and schools: at St. Louis. Li- 
brary Journal. 22:182. April, 1897. 

Part of a symposium in which the libraries of Worces- 
ter, Mass., Cleveland, O., Detroit, Mich., Milwaukee, Wis., 
and Springfield, Mass., also took part. 

51 



FREDERICK MORGAN CRUND^N 

1898. 

The endowed newspaper as an educational institution. 
Library Journal. 23:Cl47. July, 1898. 

Abstract of a paper read at the Chautauqua Conference 
of the A. L. A., 1898. 

1898. 

Special training for children's librarians. Library Jour- 
nal. 23:C82. July, 1898. 

Second part of a discussion at the Chautauqua Confer- 
ence of the A. L. A., opened by Miss Annie Carroll Moore. 

1898. 

[Library work with schools.] Library Journal. 23:Cl59- 
161. 1898. 

Discussion at the Chautauqua Conference. 

1899. 

Exclusion of badly made books. Library Journal. 24:98. 
March, 1899. 
A letter to the editor describing procedure in St. Louis. 

1899. 

Discussion of open shelves in the light of actual experi- 
ence. Library Journal. 24:Clo9. July, 1899. 
Given at the Atlanta Conference of the A. L. A. 

1899. 

Library stations. Library Journal. 24:Cl53. July, 1899. 
A brief outline of the Delivery Station system in St. 
Louis; given at the Atlanta Conference of the A. L. A. 

52 



A MEMORIAL, BIBLIOGRAPHY 



1900. 

Typewriters in libraries, [a letter to the editor.] Librarv 
Journal. 25:158. Ap., 1900. 



1900. 

[Open shelves.] Library Journal. 25:Cl53. Aug., 1900. 
Discussion at the Montreal Conference, turning largely 
on the question, "Do children steal books?" 



1901. 

What is the public library for? The Library, January, 
1901; Copied in Library Journal. 26:141. March, 1901. 

Concludes that the aim of the library is to piomote civ- 
ilization through popular education. 

1901. 

[Authorship of Father Tom and the Pope.] Library 
Journal. 26:2o(;. April, lOOl. 
A brief letter to the editor. 



1901. 

The national library, its work and functions. Library 
Journal. 26:853. Dec, 1901. 

Part of a symposium in which Messrs. E. H. Anderson, 
Johnson Brigham, Mclvil Dewey, H. L. Elmendorf, W. I. 
Fletcher, W. E. Foster, S. S. Green, W. E. Henry, R. G. 
Thwaites, C. W. Andrews and others also took part. 

53 



FREJD^RICK MORGAN CRUNDEN 

1903. 

Duplicate pay collections of popular books. Library 
JotmuiL. 28:Cl57. July, 1903. 

Discussion, at the Niagara Conference of the A. L. A., in 
which Melvil Dewey, B. C. Steiner, A. E. Bostwick, J. C. 
Dana and H. G. Wadlin also took part. 

1904. 

What some libraries are doing for the blind: St. Louis 
Public Library. Public Libraries. Ap., 1904. 

1904. 

[Address of welcome to the A. L. A. at the St. Louis 
Conference.] Library Journal. 29:Cl89-190. Dec, 1904. 

1904. 

David Rowland Francis. Rcviciv of Reviews, Amer. ed, 
30:681-683. Dec, 1904. 

A biographical sketch in a group entitled "Four Men of 
the Month." 

1904. 

[Farewell remarks to the A. L. A. at the St. Louis Con- 
ference.] Library Journal. 29:C246. Dec, 1904. 

1904. 

Report of committee on A. L. A., exhibit [at St. Louis 
conference-.] Library Journal. 29:C235-236. Dec, 1904. 

54 






A MEMORIAL, BIBUOGRAPHY 

1905. 

The public library and allied agencies. Library Journal. 
30:471-472. Aug., 1905. 

Part of a symposium in which a large number of libra- 
ries describe their extension work. 



1905. 

The question of library training. Library Journal. 30: 
C168-171. Sept., 1905. 

Strongly commends library-school training. Part of a 
discussion in which F. P. Hill, M. E. Ahern, S. S. Green 
T. Hitchler, Melvil Dewey, Herbert Putnam, C. W. An- 
drews and others also took part. 

1906. 

Proposed prohibition of importation of copyright books. 
Library Journal. 31:69. Feb., 1906. 

Mr. Crunden's contribution to a collection of statements 
made by various librarians regarding action taken by the 
Authors' Copyright League advocating restriction of im- 
portation of copyright books by libraries. 



1906. 

Copyright amendment. Public Libraries. Ap.. 1906. 
Extract from a personal letter. 



55 



FREDERICK MORGAN CRUNDEN 



MANUSCRIPTS. 
1895. 

A SKETCH OE THE WEE AND ACHIEVEMENTS OE BEN- 
JAMIN FrANKEIN and a SUMMARY OE HIS CHAR- 
ACTER) North St. Louis series oe popular 
LECTURES, Nov. 19, 1895. 

I typewritten copy. 

Dwells particularly on Franklin's agency in providing li- 
brary facilities for the city of Philadelphia. 

1897. 

The public library; what it is and what iT 
ought to be. 

I typewritten copy. 

Evidently a St. Louis address. Describes the St. Louis 
Public Library and its work and tells what might be done 
in the way of extension or improvement with more money. 
Date evidently 1897 as the last Boston report is described 
as "issued nine months after the occupancy of the new 
building." 

1898. 

Our Public Library; what it is doing and what 
IT can do eor St. Louis. 

Delivered at Shaare Emcth, Sunday, Nov. 13, 1898. 
I typewritten copy. 

Begins with a comment upon the recent failure of the 

56 



A MEMORIAL BIBUOGRAPHY 

city to vote a tax for a library building. Goes on with an 
attempt to show how greatly a building is needed and de- 
scribes in some detail the work of the library and its bene- 
fits to the community. Ends with a dissertation on the 
benefits of education and on the part played by the public 
library in an adequate system. Ends thus: — 

"But all this" says Gradgrind, "would cost a great deal 
of money." "Yes, education is very expensive; but it is 
vastly less expensive than ignorance." 

Perhaps the most important of Mr. Crundcn's unpub- 
lished addresses. 

1902. 

Notes for a talk on [Oliver Wendell] Holmes 
BEFORE THE Tuesday Club of Webster 
Groves, Dec. 2, 1902. 

I typewritten copy. 

Partly biographical and partly critical. Was evidently 
supplemented by extemporaneous passages. 

1903. 
[The public library as a source of inspiration.] 

Dedication speech, Marshalltown Iowa Public Library, 1903. Contained 
also in longer speech "Libraries as a Source of Inspiration" (1900). 
See page 39. 

I typewritten copy. 

Uses much of the material in "Libraries as a Source of 
Inspiration," but condenses it and adds new material to 
give it lightness and more popular form. 

57 



FREDERICK MORGAN CRUNDEN 
1904. 

[Speech delivered before the General Feder- 
ation OF Women's, Clubs, St. Louis, May 
1904.] 

I typewritten copy. 

Emphasizes the connection between the library and the 
school and eulogizes the work of Travelling Libraries. 
Mentions the unsuccessful efforts of the Missouri Federa- 
tion to establish a State Library Commission in 1902 and 
the projected campaign of the following year (which was 
successful). Is evidently intended to be followed by the 
substance of the Marshalltown address (see above). 

1905. 
[Notes for speech on Why Missouri should 

HAVE A commission.] 

Notes for an address before a Legislative committee in 
advocacy of the bill establisliing a State Library Commis- 
sion, St. Louis, May, 1905. 

States well the functions of a library commission and 
gives the argument in its favor. 



58 



A MEMORIAL, BIBUOGRAPHY 

PRINTED CATALOGUES AND SELECT LISTS 

OF BOOKS EDITED AND IN SOME 

CASES COMPILED BY MR. 

CRUNDEN. 



List of books in the Library relating to the science and 
art of education, n. d. 

Reference lists for readers and students. 1-7. n. d. 

Astronomy. — Buddhism. — French history. — Music. — Re- 
naissance. — Training of children. — Travels. 



1876-1905. 

Reports of the St. Louis Public Library, May 1, 1876 — 
Ap. 30, 1905. 



1879-1883. 

St. Louis Public School Library bulletin; with notes, 
courses of reading, etc. 1879 — 83. 



1880. 

Klassificirter Katalog, nebst alphabetischem Register der 
deutschen Werke. Dec, 1880. 



FREDERICK MORGAN CRUNDEN 

1884. 
Catalog of French books. [1884.] 

1884. 

Lists of the best novels, English and foreign; compiled 
by F. M. Crunden; together with lists of books for the 
young, English and German. [1884]. 

Reprinted from The St. Louis Public School Library 
Bulletin. No. 28. Oct.-Dec, 1883. 

1885. 

Catalogue of the books in the Department of Medicine 
and allied sciences; brought down to Ap. 1, 1885. 

1897. 

Class list No. 1. English prose fiction. 1897. 

1897-1898. 

St. Louis Public Library magazine. V. 4-5. Ap., 1897 — 
Nov., 1898. 

1898. 
Class list No. 2. German prose fiction. 1898. 

1903. 
Revised and enlarged. 1903. 

60 



INDEX 



INDEX 



A. L. A. catalog supplement; a discussion 51 

American Library Association; address at public 

meeting 39 

• Address of welcome at St. Louis Conference. . .54 

Farewell address at St. Louis Conference 54 

Increase of dues to 47 

• President's address 46 

Report on exhibit at St. Louis Conference 54 

Resolution of 10 

— Mr. Crunden's services to 11 

American Library Institute 15, 21 

Annual reports, Excerpts from 45, 46 

Articles by Mr. Crunden, List of 44 

Bibliography 33 

Biographical sketches 10, 14, 19, 20. 27 

Birth and parentage 14 

Blind, What some libraries are doing for the 54 

Books and text books; The library as a factor in 

education; London conference address 30 

Bostwivk, Arthur E 14 

Business methods in library management; A. L. A. 

paper 45 

Catalogues edited or compiled by F. M. Crunden 59 

Carnegie, Andrew 22 

Quoted 42 

Channing, W. E.; quoted 42 

Chautauqtmn, Reprint from 43 

Chauvenet, Wm. M., Verses by ^1 

Children's librarians, Special training for; an A. L. 

A. discussion 52 

Classification, Some thoughts on (poem) 44 

Closing a library for stocktaking; paper at A. L. A 48 

63 



INDEX 

Commercial Club address 38 

Contents 3 

Copyright amendment; a letter 55 

— Books, Proposed prohibition of importation of 55 

Course in economics in St. Louis Public Library; a 

discussion 48 

Crunden Branch library 24 

Current daily newspapers 51 

Delivery Stations; an A. L. A. paper 52 

Dewey, Melv-il; letter to Public Libraries 24 

■ Tribute in Library Journal 22 

Directors of St. Louis Public Library, Resolution of 9 

Duplicates, Clearing-house for 44 

Eliot, Chas. W. ; quoted 40 

Emporia, Kan., Normal School, address before 39 

European library contrivances; a letter 45 

Exclusion of badly made books; a letter 52 

Executive Department of Libraries; paper at A. L. A.... 47 

Exhibit at St. Louis A. L. A. Conference; report 54 

Exponent; reprint 43 

"Father Tom and the Pope" 53 

Federation of Women's Clubs, Speech before; Ms 58 

Francis, D. R.; biographical sketch of 54 

Franklin, Benjamin; sketch of his life; Ms 56 

Free Public Library, its uses and value; paper be- 
fore Commercial Club 38 

Function of a Public Library; "Round Table" address... 37 
Funeral, Account of 15 

Hall, G. Stanley; quoted 42 

Harper, Pres. ; quoted 42 

Harris, W. T. ; quoted 42 

Holmes, Oliver Wendell; notes for a talk about; Ms 57 

How things are done in one American library; 

series of articles 40 

Humor of book-titles 46 

64 



INDEX 

Illustrations, List of 5 

Inscription over portal 16, 22, 30, 37 

Illus _ 17 

International Congress of 1004; Chairman's address 42 

— Library Conference 12 

Address before 39 

Issue of fiction (lists) 45 

Lee, John F.; address at library opening 27 

Letter from F. M. Crunden to Melvil Dewey, fac-simile. .49 
Librarian and the teacher; discussion at A. L. A 43 

— As administrator; paper at A. L. A 48 

Libraries as a source of inspiration; N. Y. Convoca- 
tion address 40 

Library, Reprints from 40. 43 

Library, a plea for its recognition; Congress of Arts 

address 42 

— As a factor in the intellectual life of St. Louis 46 

— Building. St. Louis 19 

Library Journal, Articles in 44 

Editorial 19 

Extract 14 

— — Reprint 42 

Library plans 29 

— Progress; impromptu remarks 47 

■ — Reports 46 

— Site, selected 28 

— Tax. advocated 28 

— Training; a discussion 55 

Lists edited or compiled by F. M. Crunden 59 

Louisiana Purchase Exposition; article 42 

Manuscripts 56 

Missouri Historical Society 15 

• — Library Association 12 

Most popular books; interview 47 

65 



INDEX 

National Education Association 21 

■ Reprint from Proceedings, 1901 41 

National Library, its work and functions; a symposium. .53 

New Christian Quarterly; reprint 38 

New York Library Association 12 

— ■ University Convocation, Address before the 40 

Newspaper, endowed, as an educational institution; 

an A. L. A. paper 52 

Open Shelves; an A. L. A. discussion 52, 53 

Our Public Library; address at Shaare Emeth; Ms 56 

Outlook, Reprint from 41 

Pallbearers, List of 15 

Pay Duplicate Collections; an A. L. A. discussion 54 

System 44 

Philosophy of the Single Tax; objections answered; 

article 38 

Poole memorial fund; an A. L. A. report 48 

Preface 1 

Presbyterian Quarterly 38 

President of A. L. A 12, 14 

Public Libraries; editorial 20 

Verses contributed by Wm. M. Chauvenet 31 

Public Library; an interview 46 

What it is and what it ought to be; Ms 56 

A paying investment; article 41 

And allied agencies; symposium 55 

As a factor in civic improvement; article 43 

Industrial progress; article 43 

Source of inspiration; dedication speech, 

Marshalltown, P. L., Iowa; Ms 57 

Public School Library 11, 27 

Putnam, I-Ierl^ert, Extract from address of 26 

Quarlcs, Rev. Dr 38 

66 



INDEX 

Reading by school children; remarks before School 

Board 45 

Regents' Bulletin, N. Y., Reprint from 40 

Report on periodicals 45 

Review of Reviews (American), Reprint from. 42 

Round Table Club address 22, 37 

St. Louis Conference of A. L. A.; Addresses of wel- 
come and farewell 54 

Public Library; argument before School 

Board for making it free 47 

work described 40 

St. Louis Public Library Magazine, Reprint from 39 

St. Louis Republic, Interview in 46 

School and the library; N. E. A. address 41 

Schools, Libraries and; a symposium 51 

— Library work with; an A. L. A. discussion 52 

— Work with 41 

Selection of books 51 

Sully, James; quoted 42 

Taxation, Commissioner to revise 19 

Title-page fac-simile 35 

Tributes to F. M. Crunden 7 

Trustees, Functions of 51 

Typewriters in Libraries; a letter 53 

Value of a free library 46 

Washington University; corner-stone address 41 

Western Daily Mercury; reprint 38 

What is the public library for? 53 

What of the future; A. L. A. address 39 

Why Mi-,souri should have a commission; notes 

for an address; Ms 58 



67 



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