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Full text of "The handy book for genealogists: State and county histories, maps, libraries, bibliographies of genealogical works, where to write for records, etc."

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THIRD EDITION 

THE HANDY BOOK 

FOR 

GENEALOGISTS 



State and County Histories 

Maps 

Libraries 

Bibliographies of Genealogical Works 

Where to Write for Records/ etc. 



By 
George B. Everton, Sr. 
and 
Gunnar Rasmuson 



Published by 

THE EVERTON PUBLISHERS 

526 North Main Logan, Utah 



Copyright, 1957 
by 

THE EVERTON PUBUSHERS 



All Rights Reserved 



Printed by 
The Herald Printing Co. 



\^^i PREFACE 

For the third time since September 1949, ten thousand copies of 
THE HANDY BOOK FOR GENEALOGISTS have come off the press. 
When this latest edition has been distributed, 30,000 copies of this in- 
formative and easy to use guide will be in the hands of appreciative 
researchers. Since several hundreds of them have gone into that many 
libraries in various sections of the country, it is safe to estimate that 
many times 30,000 individuals will consult this important reference work 
in the years to come. 

Many new features have been added to this publication to assist 
genealogical as well as other researchers. We are especially proud of 
the fact that maps of each one of the forty-eight states are included, show- 
ing their county boundaries. Maps of most of the European countries are 
also included extending its range and effectiveness. 

What was said four years ago in the preface to the second edition, 
^ can be said with even more emphasis today — genealogical activities have 
^ multiplied tremendously in the past few years. More researchers are at 

^ work today than ever before. More family histories are available than at 
^ any previous time. More books containing vital statistics have been 

$ printed. More microfilms are obtainable by many times the former 

*^ supply and more high class reading machines have become part of the 

necessary equipment of up-to-date libraries. All of these improvements 

i^mean that it is far easier today to gather genealogical information than 

^ever before. All of these important improvements will continue to multi- 



'^ply in years to come. 



M THE EVERTON PUBLISHERS appreciate their large clientele of loyal 
v^ and appreciative customers found throughout the United States, Canada 
^and European nations. It is our fervent hope that researchers every- 
S^ where shall receive the anticipated assistance from our publications which 
vx, include THE GENEALOGICAL HELPER, a quarterly magazine, THE 
^ NEW HOW BOOK FOR GENEALOGISTS and this work, all designed to 
^help more people find more genealogy. 

^ Recognition and appreciation is expressed to The Department of 

^ Commerce, Bureau of Census and The United States Printing Office for 
^ permission to reproduce many of the maps used in this publication. 
<7 Also to Evan L. Reed who furnished Walter M. Everton, originator of 
\THE HANDY BOOK FOR GENEALOGISTS and THE GENEALOGICAL 
:^ HELPER, with map plates previously used in his "Ways and Means of 
^ Identifying Ancestors." 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign 



http://www.archive.org/details/handybookforgeneOOilever i 



Alabama 

Capital, Montgomery 

The first permanent white settlers Baldwin, Blount, Cabela which in 18-0 
to establish homes in Alabama camo there became Biggs, Clarke, Conecuh, Cotaco 
in 1702, although some historians say ^hich in 1821 became Morgan, Dallas, 
1699. About one hundred seventy four Franklin, Lauderdale, Lawrence, Lime- 
years earlier the Spanish explorers De stone, Madison, Marengo, Marion, Mont- 
Narvaes and Cabeza de Vaca passed go^ery, Monroe, St. Clair, Shelby, Tusca- 
through the section on their explora- ^^osa, and Washmgton. 
tion trips. The first white settlers to Alabama officially became a ^tate on 
move into the territory were Spanish December 14, 1819. 

and French. They established Mobile in The official census reports show the 

1702 as the first community. Alabama population to be 127,901 in 

To evade participation in the Revolu- 1820, 309,527 in 1830, 590,756 in 1840, and 

tionary War many British sympathizers 771,623 in 1850. It passed the million mark 

living in Georgia moved westward into sometime in the 1870-1880 period, and 

the Alabama section in 1775. They were in 1950 had surpassed the three million 

followed in 1783 by other planters from mark, of which two-thirds was white. All 

Georgia, Virginia and the Carolinas. of Alabama's first census, taken in 1820, 

A group of Scotch-Irish who had tried has been lost. All other census records 

farming in Tennessee in 1809 settled in are intact. Less that ten thousand of 

the northern part of Alabama, in the the 1950 population were foreign born, 

rich Tennessee Valley district. In the coming mainly from Italy, Germany, 

early 1800s former Carolinians and Vir- England, Russia, and Greece, 

ginians came into the central part of At present Alabama has sixty-seven 

the territory. Other groups from the counties. 

same section came to the western part ^he Bureau of Vital Statistics, De- 

of Alabama along the Tombigbee and partment of Public Health, Montgomery 

the Black Warrior rivers. But it was 4 Alabama, has birth and death records 

not until the end of the War of 1812 g^^ce 1908. Similar records prior to 1908 

that Alabama saw a real influx of set- ^re kept in the office of the respective 

tiers. The conclusion of that war was the county clerks. Marriage records are in 

begmmng of a gigantic southward and counties where the Probate Courts also 

westward movement which resulted in j,ave old records of deeds and wills, 

statehood for four territories between g^^^ Alabama counties have court hous- 

1816 and 1819. Alabama was the last of ^^ ^^ cities or towns in addition to the 

the four to gain statehood. ^^^nty seats. The records in those 

Previously the territory of Alabama places must be searched as well as those 

had been created from the Territory of at the county seat. Undoubtedly the 

Mississippi on March 3, 1817. St. Stephens Alabama Department of Archives and 

became the capital of the territory. In History, Montgomery, Alabama, may be 

November 1818 Cahaba, a community ex- able to furnish some information or give 

isting only in the blue-print stage, with- directions to other sources, 

out buildings or a population, was made Although not so large as in some 

the capital. states, the Alabama Department of Ar- 

So great had been the influx of people chives and History, Montgomery, Ala- 
into that south-western section that two bama, has a considerable collection of 
years and four months after Alabama genealogy and biography pertaining to 
had become a Territory a political the south. Copies of the federal census 
convention prepared a state constitution, of Alabama are also deposited there. 
This gathering was held on July 5, Sixteen Alabama cities have public 
1819 in the temporary state capital, libraries, and twenty-three have college 
Huntsville, the seat of Madison county, libraries. Among the cities with the 
located between the Tennessee River larger libraries are the following: 
and the southern boundry of the state Anniston, Calhoun county; Gadsden, Eto- 
of Tennessee. Representatives were pres- wah county; Birmingham, Jefferson 
ent from the then existing twenty-two county; Huntsville, Madison county; Mo- 
counties of Alabama, namely, Autaga, bile. Mobile county; Montgomery, Mont- 



THIRD EDITION OF THE HANDY BOOK FOR GENEALOGISTS 



gomery county; Tuskaloosa, Tuskaloosa 
county. 

Among books dealing with Alabama in- 
dividuals are the following which can 
be found in many libraries throughout 
the nation. 

Brewer, Willis: Alabama, Her History 
and Public Men, 1872. 

Owen, Thomas M., Director Alabama 
Dept. of Archives and History, Revolu- 
tionary Soldiers in Alabama, 132 pp. 
Montgomery Ala., The Brown Printing 
Co.. 1911. 

Owen, Thomas M. Our State, Alabama. 



1927. 

Ala. Society of the SAR, Roster and 
Roll of Honor, 1903-1952 (Contains names 
of 263 Rev. soldiers.) 

A partial list of Alabama libraries — 
Anniston, (Calhoun), Carnegie Library; 
Birmingham, (Jefferson), Public Li- 
brary, 700, N. 21st St.; Florence, (Lauder- 
dale), Muscle Shoals Regional Library, 
210 N. Wood Ave.; Gadsen, (Etowah, Pub- 
lic Library, Forest Ave.; Mobile, (Mo- 
bile), Public Lbirary, 701 Government 
St.; Montgomery, (Montgomery), 131 
S. Perry St. 



Alabama County Histories 

Population figures to nearest thousand, 1950 Census) 



Name 

Autauga 
Baldwin 

Barbour 
Bibb 

Blount 
Bullock 



Choctaw 

Clarke 

Clay 

Cleburne 

Coffee 

Colbert 

Conecuh 

Coosa 

Covington 

Crenshaw 

Cullman 

Dale 

Dallas 

DeKalb 

Elmore 

Escambia 
Etowah 



Fayette 
Franklin 

Geneva 
Greene 



Census 
Map Date Pop. Reports 

Inaex Formed By M Available 



D3 

Fl 

D4 
C2 

B3 
D4 



Butler E3 

Calhoun B3 

Chambers C4 

Cherokee B4 

Chilton C2 



Dl 
El 
C3 
B4 
E3 
Al 
E2 
C3 
E3 
E3 



Bl 

Al 

E3 

CI 



1818 
1809 

1832 
1818 

1818 
1866 

1819 
1832 
1832 
1836 
1868 

1847 
1812 
1866 
1866 
1841 
1867 
1818 
1832 
1821 
1866 



18 

41 

29 
18 

29 
16 



19 
27 
14 
12 
31 
40 
22 
12 
40 
19 



1824 
1818 

1868 
1819 



19 
26 



1830-80 
1830-80 

1850-80 
1830-80 

1830-80 
1870-80 



29 1830-80 

80 1860-80 

40 1840-80 

18 1840-80 

27 1880 



1850-80 
1830-80 
1870-80 
1870-80 
1850-80 
1870-80 
1830-80 
1840-80 
1830-80 
1870-80 



B2 1877 49 1880 

E4 1824 21 1830-80 

D2 1818 56 1830-80 

A3 1836 45 1840-80 

C3 1866 32 1870-80 

E2 1868 31 1870-80 

B3 1868 94 1870-80 



1830-80 
1830-80 



Parent County 



County Seat 



26 1870-80 
16 1830-80 



Montgomery Prattville 

Washington, 

part of Florida Bay Minette 

Creek Cession 1812 .... Clayton & Eufaula 
Monroe, Montgomery Centerville 

changed from Cabela 1820 
Cherokee Cession, Montgomery .... Oneonta 
Barbour, Macon, 

Montgomery, Pike Union Springs 

Conecuh, Montgomery Greenville 

Creek Cession of 1832 Anniston 

Creek Cession of 1832 La Fayette 

Cherokee Cession 1835 Centre 

Autauga, Bibb, Perry, Shelby .... Clanton 

Changed from Baker 1874 

Sumter, Washington Butler 

Washington Grove Hill 

Randolph, Talladega Ashland 

Calhoun, Randolph, Talladega .... Heflin 

Dale Elba and Enterprise 

Franklin Tuscumbia 

Monroe Evergreen 

Creek Cession of 1832 Rockfcrd 

Henry Andalusia 

Butler, Coffee, Covington, 

Lowndes, Pike Luverne 

Blount, Morgan, Winston Cullman 

Covington, Henry Ozark 

Montgomery Selma 

Cherokee Cession of 1835 .... Fort Payne 
Autauga, Coosa, 

Montgomery, Tallapoosa .... Wetumpka 

Baldwin, Conecuh Brewton 

Blount, Calhoun, Cherokee, Dekalb, 

Marshall, St. Clair Gadsden 

ch. from Blaine 1868 
Marion, Pickens, Tuscaloosa .... Fayette 
Cherokee & Chickasaw 

Cession of 1816 Russellville 

Dale, Henry, Coffee Geneva 

Marengo, Tuscaoosa Eutav/ 



County Map of Alabama 



A 



D 



LAUDERDALE 
COLBERT 



LIME- 
STONE 



FRANKLIN 



/ 



MARION 



fvT 



WINSTON 



MADISONI 



JACKSON 



MORGAN / MAR- /qe KALB 



CULLMAN^ 



ETOWAH 





s 



'BLOUNT 



FAYETTE! 



/ 



PICKENS 



JEFFERSON 



,/ 



TUSCALOOSA 



>r 



CLAY 



HALE 



SUMTER 




AUTAUGA 



LOWNDES 



? V 



ELMORE 



/ 

r 



MACON 






BULLOCK 






^ >^ CONECUH S ^>- 




RUSSELL 



ESCAMBIA 



S 



COFFEE 



GENEVA 



'^>r 



BALDWIN 



4 THIRD EDITION OF THE HANDY BOOK FOR GENEALOGISTS 

Census 
Map Date Pop. Reports 

Name Index Formed By M Available Parent County County Seat 

Hale C2 1867 21 1870-80 Greene, Marengo, 

Perry, Tuscaloosa Greensboro 

Henry E4 1819 19 1830-80 Conecuh Abbeville 

Houston E4 1903 47 Dale, Geneva, Henry Dothan 

Jackson A3 1819 39 1830-80 Cherokee Cession of 1816 .... Scottsboro 

Jefferson B2 1819 559 1830-80 Blount Birmingham 

Lamar Bl 1867 16 1880 Jones Vernon 

Lauderdale Al 1818 54 1830-80 Cherokee & Chickasaw 

Cession in 1816 Florence 

Lawrence A2 1818 27 1830-80 Cherokee Q Chickasaw 

Cession 1816 Moulton 

Lee C4 1866 45 1870-80 Chambers, Macon, 

Russell, Tallapoosa Opelika 

Limestone A2 1818 36 1830-80 Cherokee & Chickasaw 

Cession 1816 Athens 

Lowndes D3 1830 18 1830-80 Butler, Dallas, Montgomery Hayneville 

Macon D4 1832 31 1840-80 Creek Cession of 1832 Tuskegee 

Madison A3 1808 73 1830-80 Cherokee & Chickasaw 

Cession 1806-7 Huntsville 

Marengo Dl 1818 27 1830-80 Choctaw Cession of 1816 Linden 

Marion Bl 1818 27 1830-80 Tuscaloosa Hamilton 

Marshall A3 1836 45 1840-80 Blount, Cherokee Cession 1835, 

Jackson Guntersville 

Mobile Fl 1817 231 1830-80 West Florida Mobile 

Monroe E2 1815 26 1830-80 Creek Cession 1814, 

Washington Monroeville 

Montgomery D3 1816 139 1830-80 Monroe Montgomery 

Morgan A2 1818 53 1830-80 Cherokee Turkeytown Cession Name 

changed from Cotaco 1821 Decatur 

Perry C2 1819 20 1830-80 Montgomery Marion 

Pickens CI 1820 24 1830-80 Tuscaloosa Carrollton 

Pike E3 1821 31 1830-80 Henry, Montgomery Troy 

Randolph C4 1832 23 1840-80 Creek Cession 1832 Wedowee 

Russell D4 1832 40 1840-80 Creek Cession 1832 Phenix City 

St. Clair B3 1818 27 1830-80 Shelby Pell City 

Shelby C2 1818 30 1830-80 Montgomery Columbiana 

Sumter CI 1832 24 1840-SO Choctaw Cession of 1830 .... Livingston 

Talladega C3 1832 64 1840-80 Creek Cession of 1832 Talladega 

Tallapoosa C4 1832 35 1840-80 Creek Cession of 1832 Dadeville 

Tuscaloosa C2 1818 94 1830-80 Cherokee & Choctaw 

Cession 1816 Tuscaloosa 

Walker B2 1823 64 1830-80 Marion, Tuscaloosa Jasper 

Washington El 1800 16 1830-80 Mississippi Terr., Baldwin Chatom 

Wilcox D2 1819 23 1830-80 Dallas, Monroe ! Camden 

Winston B2 1850 18 1860-80 Walker, name changed from 

Hancock 1858 Double Springs 

Note — All 1820 Census records are missing. 



nzona 



Capital, Phoenix 

The first white people to come to European explorer came into the region 
Arizona were attracted there by the tale but it was about one hundred fifty years 



of the fabulous "Seven Cities of Cibola" 
which they had heard time and again in 
Mexico City. As early as 1539 the first 



later before Catholic missions were start- 
ed among the Indians. Tuscon became a 
village about the time the American 



ARIZONA 



colonies along the Atlantic coast were 
fighting their mother country in the 
Revolutionary War. As a section of New 
Mexico, Arizona came under the owner- 
ship and guidance of Mexico in 1821. 

At the close of the Mexican War in 
1848, a new dispute arose relative to ihe 
ownership of a tract of land at the inter- 
national border. To alleviate any further 
difficulties the United States minister to 
Mexico, James Gadsen, negotiated a deal, 
very unpopular in Mexico, by which the 
United States paid ten million dollars for 
slightly less than 50.000 square miles of 
land, lying south of the Gila River and 
extending east from the California 
border to the Rio Grande River. 

From the beginning the new territory 
attracted very few settlers. In 1870, 
seven years after Arizona became an 
organized territory, the entire state held 
less than ten thousand residents. In the 
forty year period that followed the 
Arizona population increased twenty 
fold, and the following half century more 
than trebled the 1910 population. The 
1950 census placed Arizona with three 
quarters of a million inhabitants. Since 
then Arizona stands in the foremost 
ranks among the states with the highest 
growth percentage. 

The foreign born population of Arizona 
comes in the following order: Mexico, 
Canada, England and Wales, Germany, 
Russia, Italy, Poland, Austria, Sweden, 
Greece, Ireland, Scotland, Yugoslavia, and 
Czechoslovakia. 

Since 1850 many Mormon families from 
Utah have settled in Arizona. In fact, 
in several large agricultural districts, 
the Mormon population predominates. 
The tremendous population increase 
since the nineteen forties is due to an 
extent to the Second World War activi- 
ties. Many of the thousands of young 
men from all parts of the United States 
who had trained for the Armed Forces 
in the Arizona military camps returned 
to the state after the war and established 
their homes. 

Arizona was the forty eighth state to 
be admitted to the union, February 14, 
1912. The state is the thirty seventh in 
population rank in the union. In 1940 
it was the forty third, which is evidence 
of its rapid growth. Its largest cities 
are according the the 1950 census: 
Phoenix, 106,818; Tucson, 45,454; Mesa, 
16,790; Douglas, 9,442, and Yuma, 9,145. 

Established in July 1909, the Division 
of Records and Statistics, State Depart- 



ment of Health, Phoenix, Arizona has 
birth and death records available since 
that date, and also similar records origi- 
nating in the county seats since 1887. 

Marriage records are on file with the 
Clerk of the Superior Court "of county 
in which the license was issued. 

Divorce actions are maintained by the 
Clerk of the Superior Court in county 
seat where the action was granted. 

Citizenship or naturalization papers are 
filed in the district court of the county 
where examination was conducted; also 
in the office of the clerk of the United 
States district courts in Tucson, Tomb- 
stone, Phoenix, Prescott, and Solomon- 
ville. 

All real estate records are on file in 
the office of the recorder of the county 
in which the land is located. 

The 1850 and the 1860 census of Arizona 
were taken as part of New Mexico. A ter- 
ritorial census of 1864 is in the office 
of the Secretary of State in the capitol 
in Phoenix. 

The best collection of Arizona history 
is at the Arizona State Department of 
Library and Archives in Phoenix at 309 
Capitol Building where microfilm fa- 
cilities are obtainable. No research is 
done by staff members. Other libraries 
with considerable Arizona and southwest 
history are in the Arizona State College 
Library, the Flagstaff Public Library and 
the Museum of Northern Arizona Library, 
P. O. Box 402, all of Flagstaff, Arizona; 
the Maricopa County Free Public Li- 
brary 831 North First Ave., Phoenix; The 
Arizona Pioneers' Historical Society Li- 
brary, University Stadium, Tucson, and 
the Genealogical Library, LDS Temple, 
Mesa. Names of professional researchers 
may be obtained from the latter if a 
self-addressed, stamped envelope is en- 
closed. 

Among books of value to the research- 
er are the following: 

American Guide Series (1940) "Arizona, 
a State Guide," gives bibliography on 
works on Arizona. Bancroft, Hubert 
Howe, "History of Arizona and New 
Mexico," (San Francisco 1889). Farish, 
Thomas E., "History of Arizona," 8 vols., 
(San Francisco 1915). McClintock, James 
Harvey, "Arizona, Prehistoric, Aborigi- 
nal, Pioneer, Modern," 3 vols., (Chicago 
1916). Lockwood, Francis Cummins, 'Pi- 
oneer Days in Arizona," (New York 
1932). 

A partial list of Arizona libraries. 
Flagstaff, (Coconino), Public Library, 212 



6 THIRD EDITION OF THE HANDY BOOK FOR GENEALOGISTS 

W. Aspen; Mesa, (Maricopa), Public Prescott, (Yavapai), Public Library; 
Library; Phoenix, (Maricopa), County Tucson, (Pima), Carnegie Free Library, 
Free Public Library, 831 N. 1st Ave.; 200 S. 6th Ave. 



County Map oi Arizona 




ARIZONA 7 

Arizona County Histories 

(Population figures to nearest thousand, 1950 Census) 

Census 
Map Date Pop. Reports 

Name Index Formed By M Available Parent County County Seat 

Apache B4 1872 28 1880 Mohave St. Johns 

Cochise F4 1881 31 Pima Bisbee 

Coconino B3 1891 24 Yavapai Flagstaff 

Gila D3 1881 24 Maricopa, Pinal Globe 

Graham D4 1881 13 Apache, Pima Safford 

Greenlee D4 1909 13 Graham Clifton 

Maricopa D2 1871 332 1880 Yavapai, Yuma Phoenix 

Mohave Bl 1864 9 1870-80 Original county Kingman 

Navajo B4 1895 29 Apache Holbrook 

Pima E3 1864 141 1870-80 Original county Tucson 

Pinal D3 1875 43 1880 Pima Florence 

Santa Cruz F3 1899 9 Pima Nogales 

Yavapai C2 1864 25 1870 Original county Prescott 

Yuma Dl 1864 28 1870 Original county Yuma 

Additional U. S. Census Data: For the 1850 and the 1860 census figures of the 
following, see New Mexico: Bernalillo, Rio Arriba, Santa Ana, Soccoro, and Valencia. 



Arkansas 



Capital, Little Rock 



The Indians had free reign in Arkansas 
until after the United States completed 
negotiations with the French for the 
Louisiana Purchase in 1803. Off and on 
during the previous two hundred sixty 
two years several French explorers had 
come to the region with their parties in 
search of whatever loot they could find. 
They came today and were gone tomor- 
row. 

With the land in the ownership of the 
United States it was immediately thrown 
open for settlement at attractive low 
prices. The new opportunities beckoned 
thousands of earlier settlers of the mid- 
east and south-east sections. The first 
comers were mainly of English, Irish and 
Scottish stock. Many moved into the 
new section from nearby Kentucky and 
Tennessee. 

What is now Arkansas became part of 
the Missouri Territory in 1812. When 
Missouri applied for statehood in 1819 
Congress created the Arkansas Territory 
included in which was what is now Okla- 
homa. On June 15, 1836 Arkansas be- 
came the twenty-fifth state in the union. 

When the Panic of 1837 dre^ned most 
of the settlers in the older southern and 
eastern states many of them set out for 
the newly created state on the west to 
make a new start in life. Thirty years 
later the rich lands between the Arkansas 



and the White Rivers attracted large 
groups of South European emigrants. 
Many came direct from Poland to estab- 
lish themselves in Pulaski County. Ital- 
ians were attracted to the northwest sec- 
tion of the state where they engaged in 
fruit raising. 

In 1830 the population of Arkansas was 
30,388; in 1850, 435,450; in 1900, 1,311,- 
564, and in 1950 it had reached nearly 
two million. 

In 1836 Arkansas had the following 
thirty counties: Washington, Carroll, 
White, Lawrence, Greene, Crawford, 
Johnson, Pope, Van Buren, Indepen- 
dence, Jackson, Mississippi, Scott, Con- 
way, Pulaski, St. Francis, Crittenden, 
Hot Spring, Saline, Jefferson, Arkansas, 
Phillips, Sevier, Pike, Clark, Hempstead, 
Miller, Lafayette, Union, and Chicot. 

In 1863 the following 55 counties exist- 
ed in Arkansas: Benton, Madison, Car- 
roll, Marion, Fulton, Lawrence, Randolph, 
Greene, Washington, Newton, Searcy, 
Izard, Independence, Jackson, Craighead, 
Mississippi, Crawford, Franklin, John- 
son, Pope, Van Buren, Conway, White, 
Poinsett, Sebastian, Scott, Yell, Perry, 
Pulaski, Prairie, St. Francis, Monroe, 
Phillips, Crittenden, Polk, Montgomery, 
Hot Spring, Saline, Jefferson, Arkansas, 
Sevier, Pike Clark, Dallas, Bradley, 
Drew, Desha, Sevier, Hempstead, Wash- 



THIRD EDITION OF THE HANDY BOOK FOR GENEALOGISTS 



ita, Calhoun, Lafayette, Columbia, Union, 
and Chicot. 

Since 1883 Arkansas has had its pres- 
ent 75 counties. 

Lawrence County, in the northeast 
corner of the state, and Arkansas Coun- 
ty, in the southeast corner, were settled 
before most of the other counties in the 
state. 

Most of the foreign born population 
came from Germany, Italy, Russia, and 
England. Of the nearly two million popu- 
lation in 1950, less than ten thousand 
were of foreign birth. 

The largest cities are Little Rock, 
101,213; Fort Smith, 47,942; North 
Little Rock, 44,097; Pine Bluff, 37,162; 
Hot Springs, 29,307. 

The Bureau of Vital Statistics, State 
Health Department, State Health Bldg., 
Little Rock, Arkansas, has birth and 
death records from 1914 and marriage 
records from 1917. Clerks of counties 
where license was obtained also have 
marriage records. The County Clerks 
also have records of wills, deeds, divorces, 
and war service. Naturalization records 
are on file in the District Courts at Lit- 
tle Rock, Helena, Batesville, Fort Smith, 
and Texarkana. 

All Arkansas federal census since 1830 
are available. The 1820 census was also 
taken in the Arkansas Territory but the 
schedules are missing. 

A continuously expanding collection 
of early Arkansas history and genealogy 



is to be found in the Public Library, 
700 Louisiana Street, Little Rock. Other 
Arkansas collections are at the Carnegie 
City Library. 318 North 13th Street, 
Fort Smith; Arkansas Agricultural, Me- 
chanical and Normal College Library, 
Pine Bluff; Garland County Public Li- 
brary, 200 Woodbine, Hot Springs; The 
University of Arkansas Library, Fayette- 
ville, and the Arkansas History Commis- 
sion, Little Rock. 

Among important books dealing with 
Arkansas and her people are the fol- 
lowing: Josiah Shinn's "Pioneers and 
Makers of Arkansas," 1908 (recognized in 
some circles as the most valuable his- 
torical record of the state); David Y. 
Thomas' "Arkansas and Its People," 4 
vols, (last two biographical). New York, 
1931; Arkansas Historical Association's 
"Arkansas Historical Quarterly," Fayettt- 
ville, 1942- ; W. F. Pope, "Early Days 
in Arkansas," 1895; similar to this in 
popular character, vast in bulk and loose 
in method, are the "Biographical and 
Pictorial Histories," covering the dif- 
ferent sections of the state, (one volume 
by J. Hallum in 1887, four others com- 
piled anonymously. 1889-1891.) 

A partial list of Arkansas libraries — 
Fayetteville, (Washington), County Li- 
brary, Court House; Hot Springs, (Gar- 
land), County Public Library, 200 Wood- 
bine; Little Rock, (Pulaski), Public Li- 
brary, 700 Louisiana St.; Pine Bluff, 
(Jefferson), County Public Library, 219 
W. Fifth Ave. 



Arkansas County Histories 

(Population figures to nearest thousand, 1950 Census) 

Census 
Map Date Pop. Reports 

Name Index Formed By M Available Parent County County Seat 

Arkansas C3 1813 24 1830-80 Original County De Witt 

Ashley D3 1848 26 1850-80 Union, Drew Hamburg 

Baxter A2 1873 12 1880 Fulton Mountain Homo 

Benton Al 1836 38 1840-80 Washington Bentonville 

Boone A2 1869 16 1880 Carrol, Marion Harrison 

Bradley D3 1840 16 1850-80 Union Warren 

Calhoun D2 1850 7 1860-80 Hampton 

Carroll Al 1833 13 1840-80 Izard Berryville 

Eureka Springs (1) 

Chicot D3 1823 22 1830-80 Arkansas Lake Village 

Clark C2 1818 23 1830-80 Arkansas Arkadelphia 

Clay A4 1873 27 1880 Randolph Corning 

Pigott (1) 

Cleburne B3 1883 11 White, Van Buren Heber Springs 

Cleveland C2 1873 9 1880 Dallas, Bradley Rison 

Columbia D2 1852 29 1860-80 Lafayette Magnolia 

Conway B2 1825 18 1830-80 Pulaski Morrilton 

Craigheadi A4 1859 51 1860-80 Mississippi, Greene Poinsett ..- Jonesboro 

and Lake City 



ARKANSAS 



Name 



Map Date Pop. 

Index Formed By M 



Crawford Bl 1820 23 
Crittenden B4 1825 47 
Cross B4 1862 25 



Dallas 
Desha 
Drew 



C2 
C3 



1845 
1838 



B2 
Bl 
A3 
C2 
C2 
A4 



Faulkner 

Franklin 

Fulton 

Garland 

Grant 

Greene 

Hempstead Dl 

Hot Spring C2 

Howard CI 

Independence A3 

Izard A3 

Jackson B3 

Jefferson 

Johnson 

Lafayette 

Lawrence 



C3 
B2 

Dl 
A3 



Lee 
Lincoln 



C4 
C3 



Little River Dl 
Logan Bl 



Lonoke 

Lovely 

Madison 

Marion 

Miller 



B3 

Al 
A2 
Dl 



Mississippi A4 

Monroe C3 

Montgomery CI 

Nevada D2 

Newton 

Ouachita 

Perry 

Phillips 

Pike 

Poinsett 

Polk 

Pope 

Prairie 



A2 
D2 
B2 
C4 
CI 
B4 
CI 
B2 
B3 



Pulaski C3 
Randolph A3 
St. Francis2 B4 



Saline 
Scott 
Searcy 
Sebastian 

Sevier 



C2 

Bl 
A2 
Bl 



1873 
1837 
1842 
1873 
1869 
1833 
1818 
1829 
1873 
1820 
1825 
1829 
1829 
1833 
1827 
1817 

1873 
1871 

1857 
1871 



1833 
1829 
1842 
1871 
1842 
1842 
1840 
1820 
1833 
1838 
1844 
1829 
1846 



1827 
1835 
1833 
1838 
1851 



12 
25 



D3 1846 18 



25 
12 

9 
47 

9 
29 
25 
22 
13 
23 
10 
26 
76 
16 
13 
21 

24 
17 

12 
20 



82 
20 

7 
15 

9 
33 

6 
46 
10 
39 
14 
23 
14 



1818 197 
1835 16 



37 

24 
10 
10 
64 



Census 

Reports 

Available 

1830-80 

1830-80 

1870-80 

1850-80 

1840-80 

1850-80 

1880 

1840-80 

1850-80 

1870-80 

1870-80 

1840-80 

1830-80 

1830-80 

1880 

1830-80 

1830-80 

1830-80 

1830-80 

1840-80 

1830-80 

1830-80 

1880 
1880 

1870-80 
1880 



Parent County 



County Seat 



1873 27 1880 
1827 

1836 12 

1835 9 

1820 33 



1840-80 
1840-80 
1880 



1840-80 

1830-80 

1850-80 

1880 

1850-80 

1850-80 

1850-80 

1830-80 

1840-80 

1840-80 

1850-80 

1830-80 

1850-80 

1830-80 
1840-80 
1830-80 
1840-80 
1840-80 
1840-80 
1860-80 



CI 1828 12 1830-80 



Lovely Van Buren 

Phillips Marion 

Crittenden, Poinsett, St. Francis .. Wynne 

Clark, Hot Springs Fordyce 

Arkansas Arkansas City 

Arkansas Monticello 

Pulaski Conway 

Crawford Charleston and Ozark 

Izard Salem 

Montgomery Hot Springs N. P. 

Jefferson Sheridan 

Lawrence Paragould 

Arkansas Hope 

Clark Malvern 

Pike Nashville 

Lawrence Batesville 

Independence Melbourne 

Independence Newport 

Arkansas, Pulaski Pine Bluff 

Pope Clarksville 

Hempstead Lewisville 

New Madrid Powhatan 

Walnut Ridge (1) 

Phillips, Monroe Marianna 

Arkansas Star City 

Vamer (1) 

Hempstead Ashdown 

Pope Booneville 

Paris (1) 

Pulaski, Jefferson Lonoke 

Abolished 1828 

Washington Huntsville 

Izard Yellville 

Abolished 1836, 

Re-established 1874 Texarkana 

Crittenden Blytheville and Osceola 

Phillips, Arkansas Clarendon 

Clark Mount Ida 

Hempstead ._ Prescott 

Johnson Jasper 

Clark Camden 

Pulaski Perryvillf; 

Arkansas Helena 

Carroll, Clark Murfreesboro 

Greene, St. Francis Harrisburg 

Montgomery Mena 

Pulaski Russellville 

Monroe Des Arc 

De Vails Bluff (1) 

Arkansas Little Rock 

Lawrence Pocahontas 

Phillips Forrest City 

Pulaski Benton 

Pulaski, Crawford, Pope Waldron 

Marion Marshall 

Crawford Fort Smith 

Greenwood (1> 
Hempstead De Queen 



10 THIRD EDITION OF THE HANDY BOOK FOR GENEALOGISTS 

Sharp A3 1868 9 1870-80 Izard Evening Shade 

Hardy (1) 
Stone A3 1873 8 1880 Izard, Independence Mountain View- 
Union D2 1829 50 1830-80 Hempstead, Clark El Dorado 

Van Buren B2 1833 10 1840-80 Independence Clinton 

Washington Al 1828 50 1830-80 Miller, Lovely Fayetteville 

White B3 1835 38 1840-80 Pulaski, Jackson, Independence .. Searcy 

Woodruff B3 1862 19 1870-80 White Augusta 

Cotton Plant (1) 

Yell B2 1840 14 1850-80 Pope Danville 

Dardanelle(l) 

1. Three courthouse fires destroyed records up to 1886, when brick courthouse 
was built. In 1883 Lake City district was formed in eastern part of county. 

2. Records destroyed by fire in 1862. 



C 



D 



County Map of Arkansas 




California 



Capital, Sacramento 



Various expeditions from Mexico, 
Spain, Russia and England visited Cali- 
fornia from 1540 to 1792. Spain con- 
trolled until 1822 when Mexico came 
into possession and held power until 
1848. It then ceded California to the 
United States. The fever that struck 
all sections of the United States and 
every country of Europe with the find- 
ing of gold at Sutter's Mill brought peo- 
ple to California from all parts of the 
world. The Gold Rush increased the pop- 
ulation from 15,000 to 250,000. In 1957 
the population was more than eleven 
million. About one tenth of the popula- 
tion is foreign born. 

The foreign born residents of Calif- 
ornia, listed in point of numbers, origi- 
nated in the following countries: Mexi- 
co, Canada, Italy, England & Wales, 
Russia, Germany, Sweden, Ireland, Scot- 
land, Poland, Austria, France, Den- 
mark, Norway, Switzerland, Portugal, 
Greece, Yugoslavia, Hungary, Nether- 
lands, Spain, Finland, Czechoslovakia, 
Rumania, Lithuania, and Belgium. 

California came into the family of the 
union on September 9, 1850 as the 
thirty-first state. It was the sixth state 
west of the Mississippi, the other five 
being Iowa, Missouri, Arkansas, Louis- 
iana, and Texas. 

In 1950 California ranked second in 
the nation both in population and area. 
The original twenty-six counties in 1850 
had in 1957 been divided into fifty-eight. 
The largest cities are Los Angeles with 
more than two million population, San 
Francisco with nearly one million. Oak- 
land and San Diego, each with about 
half a million, and Long Beach with 
more than a quarter of a million. 

Records of births and deaths since 
1905 on record in office of the Bureau 
of Records and Statistics. State De- 
partment of Health, 631 J Street, Sac- 
ramento, Calif. Many of the health of- 
fices of the larger cities have similar 
records prior to July 1, 1905, as have 
also the recorders of the various coun- 
ties, or the county clerks. The Depart- 
ment of Health in San Francisco has 
early death and cemetery records. 

The Bureau of Records and Statistics, 
address as above, and all County Clerks 
have records of marriage licences is- 
sued in the respective counties. 

Divorce records are available in the 
office of the Clerk of the Superior 
Court in the county in which the pro- 
ceedings were conducted. 



Naturalization records are kept in 
the county offices of the Superior 
Courts, and also in the United States 
Circuit Courts in Los Angeles and San 
Francisco. 

Deeds for real estate and lands are 
filed in the office of the County Recor- 
der in the county in which the land 
concerned is located. 

A communication from the Chief of 
the Bureau of Records and Statistics 
and the Chief of the Vital Records Sec- 
tion of the Department of Public 
Health says, "In the case of a request 
for a search for an unknown event, 
we require a fee of $1.00 per hour of 
search, paid in advance. An example 
of this kind of a record search is when 
a person was last known to be alive 
on a given date, and we are asked 
to search for a death record of the 
person from that date foreward. 

"There are certain items of informa- 
tion which we require in order to make 
a search of our records. These items 
vary with the type of record sought 
and the time period involved. 

'As we now have over ten million 
records on file, duplication of names 
is common. It is therefore desirable 
that secondary identifying data be 
furnished." 

The largest genealogical library on 
the west coast is that of the Public 
Library, 630 West Fifth Street, Los 
Angeles 17. No research is done by 
staff members. A departmental book- 
let of value to all genealogical research- 
ers has been issued by its genealogical 
division and may be had for the asking. 
The next largest genealogical collection 
on the coast is found in the Sutro 
Branch of the California State Library. 
Other California libraries may borrow 
books from the Sutro Branch for their 
clients. Names of professional genealog- 
ists may be obtained from the library 
in question if inquiry is made in writing 
and a self addressed, stamped envelope is 
enclosed. 

Other valuable genealogical collec- 
tions are located in California Genea- 
logical Society Library, 926-928 de 
Young Bldg., San Francisco 4; Califor- 
nia Historical Society Library, Pioneer 
Hall, 456 McAllister St., San Francisco 
2: Society of Mayflower Descendants 
Library, 12 Geary St., San Francisco 
8; Society of California Pioneers Lib- 
rary, 456 McAllister St., San Francisco 
2; Sons of the American Revolution 



11 



12 



THIRD EDITION OF THE HANDY BOOK FOR GENEALOGISTS 



Library, 926-928 de Young Bldg., 690 
Market St., San Francisco 4; Swedish 
American Hall Library, 2174 Market 
St., San Francisco 14; Stocton and San 
Joaquin County Library, Market and 
Hunter Sts., Stockton 4; Public Library, 
2090 Kittredge St., Berkeley 4; General 
Library, University of California, Berke- 
ley 4; Public Library, 425 E. Olive Ave., 
Burbank; County Library, 322 S. Broad- 
way, Los Angeles 13; Library, Univer- 
sity of California at Los Angeles, 405 
Hilgard Ave., Los Angeles 24; Public 
Library, 659 - 14th St., Oakland 12; 
Public Library, Hamilton at Bryant, 
Palo Alto; State Library, Sacramento 



9; County Free Public Library, 364 
Mt. View Ave., San Bernardino, Calif. 
Books on California: H. H. Bancroft, 
"History of California 1542-1890," 7 
vols., San Francisco 1884-90; X. H. 
Hittell, "History of California," 4 vols., 
San Francisco 1885-97; C. E. Chapman, 
"A History of California," The Spanish 
Period," New York, 1921; J. W. Caug- 
hey, "California," New York 1940; R. 
G. Cleland, "From Wilderness to Em- 
pire," New York 1944; R. G. Cleland, 
"California In Our Time," New York 
1847; State of California, Secretary of 
State, "California Blue Book," Sacra- 
mento, irregularly. 



California County Histories 

(Population figures to nearest thousand, 1950 Census) 



Name 


Map 
Index 


Date 
Formed 


Pop. 
By M 


Census 

Reports 

Available 


Alameda 


CI 


1853 


740 


1860-80 


Alpine • 


B2 


1864 


25 


1870-80 


Amador 


B2 


1854 


9 


1860-80 


Butte 


A2 


1850 


65 


1850-80 


Calaveras 


B2 


1850 


10 


1850-80 


Colusa 


Al 


1850 


12 


1850-80 


Contra Costa Bl 


1850 


299 


1860-80 


Del Norte 


A3 


1857 


8 


1860-80 


El Dorado 


B2 


1850 


16 


1850-80 


Fresno 


C2 


1856 


277 


1860-80 


Glenn 


Al 


1891 


15 




Humboldt 


B3 


1853 


69 


1860-80 


Imperial 


F4 


1907 


63 




Inyo 


D3 


1866 


12 


1870-80 


Kern 


D2 


1866 


228 


1870-80 


Kings 


D2 


1893 


47 




Lake 


Al 


1861 


11 


1870-80 


Lassen 


B4 


1864 


18 


1870-80 


Los Angeles 


E2 


1850 


4152 


1850-80 


Madera 


C2 


1893 


37 




Marin 


Bl 


1850 


86 


1850-80 


Mariposa 


C2 


1850 


5 


1850r80 


Mendocino 


Al 


1850 


41 


1850-80 


Merced 


C2 


1855 


70 


1860-80 


Modoc 


A4 


1874 


10 


1880 


Mono 


C3 


1861 


2 


1870-80 


Monterey 


CI 


1850 


131 


1850-80 


Napa 


Bl 


1850 


47 


1850-80 


Nevada 


B2 


1851 


20 


1860-80 


Orange 


E3 


1889 


216 




Placer 


B2 


1851 


42 


1860-80 


Plumas 


A2 


1854 


14 


1860-80 


Riverside 


F3 


1893 


170 




Sacramento 


B2 


1850 


277 


1850-80 


San Benito 


CI 


1874 


14 


1880 


San 










Bernardino 


E3 


1853 


282 


1860-80 



Parent County County Seat 

Cntra Costa & Santa Clara Oakland 

Eldorado, Amador, 

Calaveras Markleevillo 

Calaveras Jackson 

Original county Oroville 

Original county San Andreas 

Original county .,. Colusa 

Original county Martinez 

Klamath Crescent City 

Original county Placerville 

Merced, Mariposa Fresno 

Colusa Willows 

Trinity Eureka 

San Diego El Centro 

Tulare Independence 

Tulare, Los Angeles Bakersfield 

Tulare Hanford 

Napa Lakeport 

Plumas, Shasta Susanville 

Original county Los Angeles 

Fresno Madera 

Original county San Rafael 

Original county Mariposa 

Original county Ukiah 

Mariposa Merced 

Siskiyou Alturas 

Calaveras, Fresno Bridgeport 

Original county Salinas 

Original county Napa 

Yuba Nevada City 

Los Angeles .— Santa Ana 

Yuba, Sutter Auburn 

Butte Quincy 

San Diego, San Bernardino .... Riverside 

Original county Sacramento 

Monterey Hollister 

Los Angeles San Bernardino 



County Map of California 



13 



'°Oc/^ 



<^t£•^^ 



'^Kf j' c, 



°Lus^ 



s'^^^A 







''^^/NC 



.vt'^'^V 



'"Oo, 




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D 



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^^«e 



«£'»/v. 



'""O/NO 



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O'EGO 



"^PER,AL 



14 



THIRD EDITION OF THE HANDY BOOK FOR GENEALOGISTS 











Census 




Map 


Date 


Pop. 


Reports 


Name 


Index 


Formed 


By M 


Available 


San Diego 


F3 


1850 


557 


1850-80 


San 










Francisco 


Bl 


1850 


775 


1860-80 


San Joaquin B2 


1850 


201 


1850-80 


San 










Luis Obispo 


D2 


1850 


51 


1850-80 


San Mateo 


CI 


1856 


236 


1860-80 


Santa 










Barbara 


E2 


1850 


98 


1850-80 


Santa Clara 


CI 


1850 


291 


1860-80 


Santa Cruz 


CI 


1850 


67 


1850-80 


Shasta 


B3 


1850 


36 


1850-80 


Sierra 


A2 


1852 


2 


1860-80 


Siskiyou 


A3 


1852 


31 


1860-80 


Solano 


Bl 


1850 


105 


1850-80 


Sonoma 


Bl 


1850 


103 


1850-80 


Stginislaus 


C2 


1854 


127 


1860-80 


Sutter 


B2 


1850 


26 


1850-80 


Tehama 


Al 


1856 


19 


1860-80 


Trinity 


B3 


1850 


5 


1860-80 


Tulare 


D2 


1852 


149 


1860-80 


Tuolumne 


B2 


1850 


13 


1850-80 


Ventura 


E2 


1872 


115 


1880 


Yolo 


Bl 


1850 


41 


1850-80 


Yuba 


B2 


1850 


24 


1850-80 



Parent County County Seat 

Original county San Diego 

Original county San Francisco 

Original county Stockton 

Original county San Luis Obispo 

San Francisco Redwood City 

Original county Santa Barbara 

Original county San Jose 

Original county Santa Cruz 

Original county Redding 

Yuba Downieville 

Shasta, Klamath Yreka 

Original county Fairfield 

Original county Santa Rosa 

Tuolumne Modesto 

Original county Yuba City 

Colusa, Butte, Shasta Red Bluff 

Original county Weaverville 

Mariposa Visalia 

Original county Sonora 

Santa Barbara Ventura 

(San Buenaventura) 

Original county Woodland 

Original county Marysville 



Colorado 



Capital, Denver 



Dr. LeRoy R. Hafen, for many years 
executive director of the State Histori- 
cal Society of Colorado and the author 
of several works on Colorado, says, 
"Colorado was named for the great 
river that raises in the snowbanks of 
her western slope. The musical Spanish 
word meaning 'red' was bestowed Oii 
the river by Spanish explorers a cen- 
tury before it was applied to Colorado 
7"erritory." 

Early Spanish explorers who came 
to Mexico heard the natives tell ex- 
citing tales of cities of gold and silver 
to the northward. To find the precious 
metals many of these fortune hunt- 
ers pressed northward, some of them 
coming into sections of the present New 
Mexico, Arizona, Utah, and Colorado. 
Some of these adventurers were the 
first white men to see the Grand Canyon 
of the Colorado, the Rio Grande Valley, 
and other sections of the Rocky Moun- 
tain territory. Escalante, the Catholic 
priest who tried to find a short cut from 
Santa Fe to the Pacific Coast, came 
through there on his unsuccessful trip 
in the summer of 1776. 



About fifty years later these sections 
swarmed with competing trappers and 
fur traders working for the various 
large fur companies of eastern United 
States and Canada. 

The real settlers of Colorado didn't 
come until 1858, thus making the state 
the last to be occupied by permanent 
settlers. Many of the first-comers were 
attracted there by the discovery of gold 
and other metals. Not too successful 
in their fortune hunt, they turned to 
the land and the ranges for their live- 
liliood. 

The 1860 Census showed a population 
of about 33,000 men, and 1,500 women. 
The very next year saw a decrease in 
the male population and a considerable 
increase of women. A state census in 
1861 reported the presence of about 
21,000 men, and 4,500 women. Since then 
each national census has seen a tre- 
mendous increase. In 1870 there was a 
population of 39,864; in 1880 a five-fold 
increase, 194,327; in 1890 that was al- 
most tripled, 413,249, and in 1950 that 
was more than tripled, 1,325,089. 

The population has been divided a- 



COLORADO 



15 



bout equally between urban and rural, 
with a slight edge for the city. The 
foreign-born population of about seven- 
ty thousand have come first of all from 
the Spanish-Americas, and then from 
the following countries in the order 
mentioned: Russia, Italy, Germany, 
Sweden, England, Austria, Ireland, Den- 
mark, Greece, and Czechoslovakia. 

Settled in 1858 Colorado became a 
Territory February 28, 1861, and was 
admitted to statehood August 1, 1876. 
It was called the Centennial State be- 
cause it became part of the union 100 
years after the formation of the United 
Slates. 

The first territorial assembly created 
the first 17 counties in September 1861. 
They were Arapahoe, Boulder, Clear- 
Creek, Costilla, Douglas, El Paso, Fre- 
mont, Gilpin, Guadalupe (later named 
Conejos), Huerfano, Jefferson, Lake, 
Larimer, Park, Pueblo, Summit and 
Weld. It was almost twenty years later 
or in 1880, that the legislature estab- 
lished twenty-four more counties, mak- 
ing a total at that time of forty-one. 
In the intervening years twenty-six 
other counties have been formed by the 
division of the earlier counties, Colorado 
now has 63 counties. 



Birth records before January 1907 
may be obtained from the respective 
county clerks, after January 1907 from 
the State Bureau of Vital Statistics, 
Denver, Colorado. 

Death records before January 1900 
n)ay be obtained at the offices of the 
county clerks, after January 1900 at 
the Bureau of Vital Statistics. 

Marriage records are kept by the 
county clerks. Marriages were not re- 
corded until after 1881. 

Probate matters and wills are on 
file in the office of the county clerk. 

All land titles, deeds, mortages, 
leases, etc. are kept by the county re- 
corder. 

An efficient and congenial staff of 
librarians is ready to assist all research- 
ers in the rapidly growing genealogi- 
cal section of the Public Library, Civic 
Center, Denver 2. Rocky Mountain re- 
gion history and lore is available at 
the University of Colorado Library, 
Boulder; Public Library, 21 W. Kiowa 
St., Colorado Springs; McClelland Pu- 
blic Library, 100 Abriendo Ave., Pueb- 
lo. Information regarding profession- 
al researchers may be obtained by send- 
ing self-addressed envelopes to libraries. 



Colorado County Histories 

Population figures to nearest thousand, 1950 Census) 



Name 



Census 
Map Date Pop. Reports 

Index Formed By M Available 



Adams 


B2 


1861 


40 


1880 


Alamosa 


D4 




11 




Arapahoe 


C2 


1861 


52 


1870 


Archuleta 


E4 


1885 


3 




Baca 


A4 


1889 


8 




Bent 


B4 


1874 


9 




Boulder 


C2 


1859 


48 


1870 


Chaffee 


D3 


1879 


7 




Cheyenne 


A3 


1889 


3 




Clear Creek 


D2 


1859 


3 


1870 


Conejos 


D4 


1861 


10 


1880 


Costilla 


C4 


1859 


6 


1870 


Crowley 


B3 




5 




Custer 


C3 


1877 


2 




Delta 


E3 


1883 


17 




Denver 


C2 




416 


1880 


Dolores 


F4 


1881 


2 




Douglas 


C2 


1859 


4 


1870 


Eagle 


D2 


1883 


4 




Elbert 


B2 


1874 


4 




El Paso 


C3 


1859 


75 


1880 


Fremont 


C3 


1859 


18 


1870 



Parent County County Seat 

Original county Brighton 

Costilla Alamosa 

Original county Littleton 

Conejos Pagosa Springs 

Las Animas Springfield 

Greenwood Las Animas 

Original county Boulder 

Lake Salida 

Buena Vista 

Bent, Elbert Cheyenne Wells 

Original county Georgetown 

Original county Conejos 

Original county San Luis 

Bent Ordway 

Fremont Westcliffe 

Silver Creek 

Gunnison Delta 

Adams Denver 

Ouray Dove Creek 

Original county C£istle Rock 

Summit Eagle 

Red Cliff 

Douglas, Greenwood Kiowa 

Original county Colorado Springs 

Original county Canon City 



16 



THIRD EDITION OF THE HANDY BOOK FOR GENEALOGISTS 



County Map of Colorado 




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COLORADO 



17 



Garfield E2 1883 12 Summit Glenwood Springs 

Gilpin C2 1861 9 Original county Central City 

Grand D2 1874 4 Summit Hot Sulphur Spr. 

Gunnison E3 1874 6 Lake Gunnison 

Hinsdale E4 1874 3 Conejos Lake City 

Huerfano C4 1861 11 1870-80 Original county Walsenburg 

Jackson Dl 1891 2 Grand Walden 

Jefferson C2 1861 56 1870-80 Original county Golden 

Kiowa A3 1889 3 Cheyenne, Bent Eads 

Kit Carson A2 1889 9 Elbert Burlington 

Lake D2 1861 6 1870-80 Original county Leadville 

La Plata E4 1874 15 1880 Conejos, Lake Durango 

Larimer CI 1861 44 1870-80 Original county Fort Collins 

Las Animas B4 1866 26 1880 Huerfano Trinidad 

Lincoln B3 1889 6 Elbert Hugo 

Logan Bl 1887 17 Weld Sterling 

Mesa F3 1883 39 Gunnison Grand Junction 

Mineral E4 1893 7 Hinsdale Creede 

Moffatt El 1909 6 Routt Craig 

Maybelle 

Montezuma F4 1889 10 La Plata Cortez 

Montrose F3 1883 15 Gnnrcison Montrose 

Morgan Bl 1889 18 Weld Fort Morgan 

Otero B4 1889 25 Bent La Junta 

Ouray E3 1877 2 Hinsdale Ouray 

Park D2 1861 2 1870-80 Original county Fairplay 

Phillips Al 1889 5 Logan Holyoke 

Pitkin D2 1881 2 Gunnison Aspen 

Prowers A4 1889 15 Bent Lamar 

Pueblo C3 1861 90 1880 Original county Pueblo 

Rio Blanco E2 1874 5 1880 Summit Meeker 

Rio Grande D4 13 Conejos Del Norte 

Routt El 1877 9 1880 Grand Steamboat Springs 

Saguache D3 1870 6 Costilla Saguache 

San Juan E4 1876 1 La Plata Silverton 

San Miguel F3 1883 3 Ouray Telluride 

Sedgwick Al 1889 5 Logan Julesburg 

Summit D2 1861 1 1870-80 Original county Breckenridge 

Teller C3 1891 3 Fremont Cripple Creek 

Washington B2 1889 3 Logan Akron 

Weld Bl 1861 68 1870-80 Original county Greeley 

Yuma A2 1889 11 Washington Wray 

* For Arapahoe 1860 U. S. Census figures see Kansas 1860. 



Connecticut 



Capital, Hartford 



The settlement of Connecticut began in 
1635 by former Massachusetts colonists. 
Some of them left Massachusetts on order 
of narrow religious leaders, and others 
because they had become weary of the 
intolerant attitude displayed by those 
leaders. The green Connecticut valley 
had beckoned them with abundant evi- 
dences of opportunities for material pros- 
perity. Most of the settlers in the Mass- 
achusetts towns of Newtown, Watertown 
and Dorchester, all near Boston, moved 



their families and all of their belongings 
to the central part of Connecticut, where 
along the Connecticut River they estab- 
lished three new communities which later 
came to be called Windsor, Hartford and 
Wethersfield. It was an attack on these 
three communities that later caused the 
Pequod Indian War. 

As early as 1614 a Dutch seafarer, 
Adriaen Block, sailed up the broad 
river, which he named the Varsche Riv- 
er. The first knowledge of the fertile 



18 THIRD EDITION OF THE HANDY BOOK FOR GENEALOGISTS 

section of Connecticut the early settlers colonies, Connecticut had more home in- 

of Massachusetts learned from the Indi- dustries than any other colony. All kinds 

ans who gave them a highly painted word of household gadgets were invented and 

picture of the section. It was this that manufactured in the homes. These early 

brought about the settlement of the three necessities were carried all over the 

communities mentioned in the para- eastern section of the present United 

graph. Late in 1635 about fifty persons States, even down to New Orleans, by 

left what is now Cambridge, then called the so called "Yankee Pedlars". With 

Newtown, and established themselves the heavy migration in the latter part 

at Suckiaug, now Hartford. New mi- of the eighteenth century away from the 

grations continued throughout the next state, Connecticut sent lavish invitations 

few years. While the Dutch remained at to Europe for more families to settle 

the trading posts or forts, the English there. 

spread all over the territory. Most of About that time a severe potato crop 

these settlers were strong willed, opiniat- failure in Ireland brought four million 

ed Englishmen, always suspicious of the people to the verge of starvation. It 

motives of the leaders of the various didn't take many inducements for them 

groups. Speaking of the kind of govern- to accept suggestions or invitations to 

ment established in some of these early make their home in Connecticut. Thous- 

settlements, one historian has said, "... ands of them came in the late 1840's al- 

the legislative body continued to dom- though many had come for ten years pre- 

inate the executive and the judicial. It viously. It is estimated that more than 

is worthy of note that the preamble 70,000 Irish came during that period 

presumed a close relation between who with their descendants now number 

Church and State, and that in 1659 the more than 200,000. 

general court imposed a property quali- Since 1880 it is estimated that more 

fication for suffrage. There was a dis- than 80,000 Germans have sought resi- 

tinct aristocratic element in this de- dence in various sections of the state, 

mocracy." Unlike many other nationalities the 

From 1635 to 1644 another English Germans seldom live in solid nationali- 

colony flourished at Saybrook, near the ty groups but are more intermingled with 

mouth of the Connecticut, but then fad- the already existing population, 

ed away. In 1643, New Haven was ex- Canada has always contributed freely 

tended as a colony to include Milford to the population of Connecticut. The 

(1639), Guilford (1639), and Stamford English-Canadians have generally come 

(1641). to Hartford or some of the other larger 

During the ten year period from 1640 cities in the state, while the French- 

to 1650, there was a heavy influx of Canadians have been satisfied to cross 

settlers into Connecticut. The new set- over the border separating them from 

tiers came almost entirely direct from the United States and settle down in 

England. The following forty years saw some of the north-eastern industrial 

a tremendous migration away from the cities where upwards of seventy thous- 

newly settled district. The movement was and of them have been employed in the 

generally westward where fertile fields textile industry. 

beckoned those anxious to secure their During the past eighty years a heavy 
independence. In many instances the en- influx of Scandinavians has been register- 
tire population of some of the towns par- ed in Connecticut. The earlier migration 
ticipated in the migration and established was much heavier than the later. It 
themselves again among their old neigh- is estimated that upwards of fifty-five 
bors in a new environment. thousand persons have come from those 

The 1790 Census of Connecticut shows nations to the Nutmeg State, about eight 

a population of 232,236. All of them with per cent from Norway, eleven per cent 

the exception of three and eight-tenths from Denmark, and eighty-one per cent 

per cent, or 223,437 had come from Eng- from Sweden. The majority of them 

land proper. Scotland was represented have engaged in the mechanical arts, 

with two and eight-tenths per cent, or while some have engaged in gardening 

6,425; Ireland with seven-tenths per cent, and farming, 

or 1,589; France, two-tenths per cent, or The Italians have been coming to 
512; Holland, one-tenth per cent, or Connecticut in quite a solid stream over 
258. There were also five Hebrew, four the past eighty years. The greatest in- 
German, and six from other countries. flux was during the first sixteen years 

During the early days of the American of the twentieth century. The first and 



CONNECTICUT 19 

second generation of Italians number ap- of estates are in the probate districts, 

proximately more than 300,000 in Con- These are not always identical with the 

necticut today. While good-sized colo- town. 

nies of them live in many of the cities, The Church records are still in the 

most of them are centered around Hart- respective churches. If information is 

ford. desired from them, it may be best to 

With about an equal distribution in write the town clerk and ask him to 

agricultural and industrial pursuits there help you decide where to seek the data 

are about 150,000 former residents of desired. 

Poland in Connecticut. They have con- The census records of the state are 
centrated especially around Bridgeport all complete. The 1790 census is print- 
and New Britain. The factories and in- ed in book form and can be found in 
dustrial plants of Waterbury have em- most libraries. The later census records 
ployed most of the 40,000 Lithuanians are in the National Archives in Wash- 
who have come here over the years, ington, D. C. and are available for re- 
while about an equal number from search. In doing research in the Ar- 
Czechoslovakia have centered around the chives, it is to your advantage to em- 
Bridgeport plants. About 30,000 Mag- ploy a professional researcher. Write 
yars (Hungarians) are also established to the National Archives, Washington, 
in the state, about nine thousand foreign D. C. state your problem and ask for 
born living there in 1950. suggestions how to proceed. 

Hartford and New Haven have a larg- Some Connecticut towns had a cen- 
er proportion of Jews than any other sus taken in 1776. Information con- 
cities in America with the exception of cerning this may be obtained from the 
New York and Atlantic City. In round Connecticut State Library, Hartford, 
numbers the state has a Jewish popula- Conn, 
tion of about one hundred thousand. Bureau of Vital Statistics, State De- 

The 1950 census shows that Connecti- partment of Health, State Office Bldg., 

cut has also nine thousand each of Hartford 15, Conn., has birth, death and 

Austrians and Ukranians, eight thous- marriage records since July 1, 1897. 

and Scots, four thousand Greeks, twenty- Earlier similar recards are on file in 

five hundred Finns, and a large number the city or town offices of the respective 

of Armenians. It is estimated that about communities. 

four times these numbers reprjesent Information on divorces may be ob- 

the first two generations of these na- tained for a fee in the office of the 

tionalities in the state. Connecticut was clerk of the Superior Court in the county 

the ninth colony to be settled. It was where the proceedings were heard, 

the fifth state to enter the union, Janu- Naturalization records are on file in 

ary 5, 1788. the office of the United States Circuit 

Connecticut in 1950 had a population court in Hartford, or in the county of- 
of 2,007,280. The density of the pop- fices of the Superior Courts, 
ulation is the fourth in the nation, 400.7 The Lutheran and the Episcopal 
persons per square mile, as compared churches have available besides the vital 
to 28.8 persons per square mile in Tex- statistics, the christening, baptism, con- 
as or 8.8 persons per square mile in North firmation, entrance and departure dates 
Dakota. More than three-fourths of its and burials. 

population live in its cities, and less The town clerks also have custody of 

than one fourth in the rural districts, the land records. 

Its largest cities are Hartford, 177,397 The district courts of the counties are 

inhabitants; New Haven, 164,443; Bridge- the custodians of wills, inventories and 

port, 158,709; Waterbury, 104,477; Stam- administrations of estates; Sometimes a 

ford, 74,293; and New Britain, 73,725. town constitutes a district. Sometimes 

Three of its eight counties have a pop- several smaller towns are grouped into 

ulation of more than half a million each, one probate district. There are 118 dis- 

Unlike most states the town clerk, tricts and 169 towns, 
rather than the county clerk, is the Almost every city or town in the state 
custodian of marriage licenses and re- have printed histories containing a great 
cords, marriage and death records, and deal of genealogy especially concerning 
land records. Long before the counties the early inhabitants. Many family gene- 
were organized, the town clerks were alogies have also been printed, 
recording these statistics. Record of A wealth of information on early day 
wills, inventories and administrations families of Connecticut may be found 



20 THIRD EDITION OF THE HANDY BOOK FOR GENEALOGISTS 

in almost every library. Many books Wethersfield, Windsor, Windsor Locks, 
have been published, giving the names Litchfield: Barkhamsted, Bethlehem, 
of the participants in all of the Ameri- Bridgewater, Canaan, Colebrook, Corn- 
can wars. Numerous family histories wall, Goshen, Harwinton, Kent, Litch- 
have been printed and are available at field, Morris, New Hartford, New Mil- 
most of the libraries, and most of the ford, Norfolk, North Canaan, Plymouth, 
towns and cities have valuable histories Roxbury, Salisbury, Sharon, Thomaston, 
of their founding, growth and progress. Torrington, Warren, Washington, Water- 
Many of the family histories in the li- town, Winchester, Woodbury, 
braries are in manuscript form. Many of Middlesex: Chester, Clinton, Crom- 
them have been indexed to facilitate re- well. Deep River, Durham, East Had- 
search activities. Information regard- dam. East Hampton, Essex, Haddam, 
ing these indexes may be obtained from Killingworth, Middlefield, Middletown, 
the libraries if self-addressed, stamped Old Saybrook, Portland, Westbrook. 
envelopes accompany the request. No New Haven: Beacon Falls, Bethany, 
research is done by library staff mem- Branford, Cheshire, Derby, East Haven, 
bers, but information regarding pro- Guilford, Hamden, Madison, Meriden, 
fessional researchers may be given by Middlebury, Milford, Naugatuck, New 
the libraries. Haven, North Branford, North Haven 

Town and vital records and genealo- Orange. Oxford, Prospect, Seymour, 
gical information pertaining to the early Southbury. Wallingford, Waterbury, 
days of the state may be obtained from West Haven, Woodbridge, Woolcot. 
the Public Library, 925 Broad St., Bridge- New London: Bozrah, Colchester, East 
port 4; Public Library, 215 Greenwich Lynne, Franklin, Griswold, Groton. 
Ave., Gi-eenwich; Connecticut Historical Lebanon, Ledyard, Lisbon, Lyme, Mont- 
Society, 1 Elizabeth St., Hartford 5; ville. North Stonington, Norwich, Old 
State Library, Capitol Ave., Hartford 1; Lyme, Preston, Salem, Sprague, Stoning- 
Public Library, 624 Main St., Hartford 3; ton, Waterford. 

Curtis Memorial Public Library, 175 E. Tolland: Andiver, Bolton, Columbia, 

Main St., Meriden; Free Public Library, Coventry, Ellington, Hebron, Mansfield, 

133 Elm St., New Haven 11; Yale Uni- Somers, Stafford Tolland, Union, Willing- 

versity Library, 120 High St., New Hav- ton. 

en; The Public Library, New London; Windham: Ashford, Brooklyn, Canter- 
Otis Public Library, Norwich; Ferguson bury, Chaplin, Hampton, Eastford, Kil- 
Public Library, Broad and Bedford Sts., lingly. Plainfield, Pomfret, Putnam, 
Stamford; Wilbur L. Cross Library, Uni- Scotland, Sterling, Thompson, Windham, 
versity of Connecticut, Storrs; Silas Bron- Woodstock. 

son Public Library, 267 Grand St., Water- Connecticut Towns organized before 

bury 2. 1800: 

Among books about Connecticut and Fairfield County — Brookfield 1788; 
its people are the following: John Warner Danbury 1684; Fairfield 1639; Green- 
Barber, "Historical Collections," 1836; wich 1640; Huntington 1788; New Fair- 
Edgar L. Heermance, "Connecticut field 1740; Newton 1700; Norwalk 1649; 
Guide;" Samuel Peters, "General His- Redding 1757; Ridgefield 1709; Stam- 
tory of Connecticut," 1781. ford 1648; Stratford 1639; Trumbull 

The various counties of Connecticut 1798; Weston 1717. 
are at present divided into the following Hartford County — Berlin 1785; 
townships: Fairfield: Bethel, [Bridgeport, Bristol 1747; Canton 1740; East Wind- 
Brookfield, Darien, Danbury, Easton, sor 1680; Enfield 1681; Farmington, 
Fairfield, Greenwich, Monroe, New 1640; Glastonbury 1690; Grandby 1786; 
Canaan, New Fairfield, Newtown, Nor- Hartford 1635; Hartland 1753; Sims- 
walk, Redding, Ridgfield, Sheldon, Sher- bury 1670; Southington 1779; Suf field 
man Stamford, Stratford, Trumbull, 1674; Wethersfield 1635; Windsor 1633. 
Weston, Westport, Wilton. Litchfield County — Barkhamsted 

Hartford: Avon, Berlin, Bloomfield, 1746; Bethlehem 1787; Canaan 1739: 
Bristol, Burlington, Canton, East Gran- Colebrook 1779; Cornwall 1740; Goshen 
by. East Hartford, East Windsor, Enfield, 1739; Harwinton 1731; Kent 1739; Litch- 
Farmington, Glastonbury, Granby, Hart- field, 1719; New Hartford, 1739; New 
ford, Hartland, Manchester, Marlbor- Milford, 1712; Norfolk, 1744; Plymouth 
ough. New Britain, Newington, Plain- 1795; Roxbury, 1796; Salisbury, 17:30; 
ville, Rock Hill, Simsbury, Southington, Sharon, 1732-3; Torrington, 1740; Wash- 
South Windsor, Suf field. West Hartford, ington, 1779; Warren, 1786; Watertown, 



CONNECTICUT 



21 



1780; Winchester, 1771; Woodbury, Cheshire, 1723; Derby, S. 1675; Guil- 

1674. ford, 1639; Hamden, 1786; Meriden, 

Middlesex County — Chatham, 1767; 1796; Millford, 1639; New Haven, 1638; 

Durham, 1698; E. Haddam, 1685; Had- North Haven, 1786; Oxford, 1798; Sey- 

dem, 1662; Killingsworth, 1667; Middle- mour, 1672; Southbury, 1672; Wallings- 

town, 1653; Saybrook, 1635. ford, 1669; Waterbury, 1686; Walcott, 

New Haven County — Branford 1644; 1796; Woodbridge, 1786. 



County Map of Connecticut 



D 



R h E 




22 



THIRD EDITION OF THE HANDY BOOK FOR GENEALOGISTS 



New London County — Bozrah, 1786; 
Colchester, 1703; Franklin, 1786; Gro- 
ton, 1705; Lebanon, 1700; Lisbon, 1786; 
Lyme, 1664; Montville, 1786; New Lon- 
don, 1646; Norwich, 1660; Preston, 1687; 
Stonington, 1649. 

Tolland County — Bolton, 1716; Cov- 
entry, 1709; Ellington, 1786; Hebron, 



1704; Mansfield, 1713; Somers, 1734; 
Stafford, 1718; Tolland, 1700; Union, 
1727; Vernon ,1716; Willington, 1720. 

Windham County — Ashford, 1710; 
Brooklyn, 1786; Canterbury, 1690; 
Hampton, 1786; Killingly, 1700; Plain- 
field, 1699; Pomfret, 1686; Sterling, 
1794; Thompson, 1715; Voluntown, 1696; 
Windham, 1689; Woodstock, 1749. 



Connecticut County Histories 

(Population figures to nearest thousand, 1950 Census) 



Name 



Census 
Map Date Pop. Reports 

Index Formed By M Available 



Fairfield F4 1666 504 1790-80 

Hartford D2 1666 540 1790-80 

Litchfield E2 1751 99 1790-80 

Middlesex C3 1785 67 1790-dO 



New Haven E3 
New London B3 
Tolland B2 

Windham A2 



1666 546 1790-80 

1666 145 1790-80 

1786 45 1790-80 

1726 62 1790-80 



Parent County County Seat 

Original county Bridgeport 

Original county Hartford 

Hartford, Fairfield Litchfield 

Hartford, New London, 

New Haven Middletown 

Original county New Haven 

Original county .... New London & Norwich 

Windham Tolland 

Hartford, New London Putnam 

Willi mantic 



Delaware 



Capital, Dover 



Delaware is next to the smallest of 
the states in area. Although it is al- 
most twice as large as Rhode Island, 
it has less than half as large a popu- 
lation. 

It is a narrow, elongated state east of 
Maryland and west of the Delaware 
River, the Delaware Bay and the At- 
lantic Ocean. It is about 93 miles long, 
33 miles wide at the southern end, about 
19 miles at the middle of the state, and 
about eight miles wide at the northern 
end. Dover, its capitol, is about equidis- 
tant from the northern and the south- 
ern borders of the state. 

In its colonial days the Hudson River 
was referred to by the colonists as "the 
north river" and the Delaware as "the 
south river". 

Late in August 1609, Henry Hudson 
a British seacaptain and adventurer m 
the service of the Dutch West Indi'i 
Company, visited the Delaware sectloi, 
en route to the Hudson River in search 
of a northwest passage. 

During a six-year period between 
1614 and 1620 a group of sailors under 
the captaincy of Cornelius Hendrickseri, 
a Dutch navigator, visited the section. 
As ^i result of information brought 
back to Holland by these sailors the 
Dutch West India Campany was organi- 



zed in 1621. In 1629 this company adop- 
tee a charter to grant land in the new 
vrorld to feudal lords. The following 
year the company bought land adjoining 
the Delaware River, and in 1631 David 
Pietersen de Vries established a camp 
on Lewes Beach. 

Hearing how other European mon- 
archs fostered expediti^^ns and settle- 
ments in the new world, the Swedisli 
r-.ilers encouraged the New Sweden 
Company in outfitting an expedition 
of two boats, "The Kalmar Nyckel ' 
and "Grip". They arrived at James- 
town, Va., in March 1638, remained 
there ten days and then continued to 
Delaware. They established settlements 
in the rich section south of the present 
Wilmington, in the extreme north of 
the colony. They were attacked by the 
Dutch at different times from 1651 to 
1655 when the Swedes were routed from 
Fort Christina, named after the then 
twenty-one year old Queen Kristina, 
daughter of Gustaf Adolf, who lost his 
life on the battlefield at Lutzen, Gei- 
niony, in 1632. 

The first Finnish colonists came to 
Delaware in 1656 aboard a Swedish 
ship. 

The British forces took possession of 
^he Delaware Colony and Amsterdam 



DELAWARE 23 

(New York) in 1664. Two years later archives of the state of New York. 

a large influx of English people from After 16S1 they were stored in the Ar- 

Virginia, Maryland, New Jersey, Nevv^ chives of Pennsylvania. As the counties 

York, and Europe made their homes exercised full powers as government, 

among the Swedes and the Dutch in not all of the colonial records went to 

Delaware. From then on conditions a- Pennsylvania. Some are to be found 

rnong the colonists greatly improved in the Delaware Archives in Dover, 

and more unity was established. I^and records after 1785 will be found 

Most of the colonists came to the in the county courthouses and wills also 

New World for religious as well as after 1800. 

material or financial purposes. Churches In the Bureau of Vital Statistics, 
were among the first buildings erected State House, Dover, will be found a 
as each new community was establish- record of births, deaths and marriages 
ed. The Swedes brought with them since 1881. There are some marriages 
i-eligious desires of their groups. The recorded as early as 1847. A record of 
Dutch settlers had in their companies births was kept from 1861 to 1863. 
priests of the Reformed church who The State Archivist said in June, 
functioned in chapels erected by their 1952, *'A11 extant public records of Dela- 
fJocks. Many Irish who came after 1698 ware and its political subdivisions dated 
ior the right of worshiping in accord- before 1873, other than deeds and mort- 
ance with the Presbyterian faith gave gages, are in the custody of The Pub- 
an early impetus to that body. As early lie Archives Commission. Original vit- 
as 1730 many staunch Roman Cathol- al statistics entries to 1913 are also in 
ics established themselves in the north- our custody. It is not possible to list a 
ern part of Delaware, where the first specific fee for service on these records, 
Catholic chapel was built in 1772 on the since most requests are for photostatic 
Lancaster Pike, going northeast from or microfilm copies. Our scale of prices 
V/ilmington to Philadelphia. Another for these is based on the size and num- 
influx of Catholics came in 1790 when ber of pages to be copied, and is in 
several French families sought line with commercial rates in the area, 
rescue here from the West Indies up- "Vital statistics since 1913 are in 
risings. Among them were some who the custody of the Bureau of Vital Sta- 
since then have played important parts tiotics, Dover, Delaware, 
in the financial development of the "Deeds and mortgages are in the cus- 
United States. tody of the respective Recorders of 

Many setllers who first arrived in New Castle, Kent and Sussex Counties 

the northern part of Delaware spread in courthouses in Wilmington, Dover, 

from there into Pennsylvania, Mary- and Georgetown, Delaware. All service 

land and New Jersey. on such records is through those of- 

When Delaware ratified the Consti- tices. 
tution of the United States on Decem- "The Historical Society of Delaware 
ber 7, 1787, it became the first state has a small file of birth, death and mar- 
in the Union. rjage records culled from newspaper 

During the Civil War, although a files which does not in all instances 

slave state, Delaware was on the side duplicate our own. 

of the regular government. "Before 1790 all extant marriage re- 

Becase of the slow transportation cords are from unofficial sources. So 

methods in the early days, the state's also are birth and death records before 

three counties were divided into dis- the Civil War period. Before 1913 cov- 

tvicts, called hundreds. The hundreds erage was not complete in all categories 

correspond to a township. for each year." 

The 1950 census gave Delaware a All Delaware Census records are 

population of 318,085, which ranks 46th available with the exception of the 

in the nation. The largest cities are entire 1790 Census which is missing. 

Wilmington, 110,356; Newark. 6,731; Books on Delaware: 

Dover, 6,223; New Castle, 5,396; ELs- Israel Acrelius, Swedish Luthera'i 

mere, 5,314, and Milford, 5,179. About minister, wrote history of New Sweden 

62 per cent of the people live in the about 1714-1791. 

cities, and 38 per cent in the rural Finck, "Lutheran Landmarks and 

areas. Among the foreign born the Pioneers in America." 

Italians, Poles, Russians, Irish, Ger- Benjamin Farris, "A History of the 

mans and English predominate in thai Original Settlements on the Delaware." 

order. &c," Wilson and Heald, Wilmington, 

The early colonial records of Dela- 1846, 31? p. 

ware are scattered. Some are in the J. M. Runk & Co., "Biographical and 



24 



THIRD EDITION OF THE HANDY BOOK FOR GENEALOGISTS 



Genealogical History of the State of 
Delaware" ChambersWurg, Pa., 1899, 
2 vols. 

Amandus Johnson, "The Swedish 
Settlements on the Delaware, Their 
History and Relations to the Indians, 
Dutch and English, 1638-1664," N. Y., 
U. of Pa. Press per D. Appleton & Co., 



Agents, 1911, 2 vols. 

Chi*istopher Ward (Longstreth), 
"Dutch and Swedes on the Delaware 
1609-1664," Philadelphia, University of 
Pa. Press, 1930, 393 p. 

See, "Delaware, The American Guide 
Series," 1938, pp. 537, 538 for histories 
of Delaware cities, towns and villages. 



Delaware County Histories 

(Population figures to nearest thousand, 1950 Census) 

Census 
Map Date Pop. Reports 

Name Index Formed By M Available Parent County County Seat 

Kent Bl 1682 38 1800-80 St. Jones, Name ch. in 1682 Dover 

New Castle B2 1673 219 1800-80 Original county Wilmington 

Sussex B3 1682 61 1800-80 Early 17th Century 

Horrekill District Georgetown 

See Maryland for Map 

District of Columbia 



(Washington, D. C.) 



The capital of the United States cov- 
ers about seventy square miles on the 
northeast side of the Potomac River, 
about 38 miles southwest of Baltimore. 
In the ten year period from 1940 to 
1950 the population increased 139,087 
from 663,091 to 802,178. 

The Bureau of Vital Statistics, Health 
Department, D. C, 300, Indiana Ave,, 
N. W., Washington, D. C, is the cus- 
todian of births from 1871 to the pre- 
sent, and deaths from 1855 to the pre- 
sent, except 1861 and 1862. Custodian 
of marriages is the Clerk, U. S. Dis- 
trict Court for the District of Columbia, 
Fourth and E Streets, N. W., Washing- 
ton, D. C. Custodian of wills is the 
Register of Wills, Fifth and E Streets, 
N. W. In charge of all real estate re- 
cords and land titles is the Recorder 
of Deeds, Sixth and D. Streets, N. W., 
Census records may be obtained from 
the U. S. Bureau of the Census, Wash- 
ington 25, D. C. Taxpayer lists are at 



the office of the Tax Collector, District 
of Columbia, District Bldg., Washing- 
ton, D. C. All cemetery records are 
kept at the individual cemeteries. 

"In 1800," says a historian, "Washing- 
ton, the new capital, had been recently 
occupied. It was hardly a village, ex- 
cept on paper, and contained only the 
Capitol, the White House, two depart- 
mental buildings, and a few boarding 
houses. The public buildings were still 
uncompleted. Mrs. Adams (the wife of 
President John Adams) found the aud- 
ience room of the White House conven- 
ient for drying clothes, and the repre- 
sentatives met in a temporary building 
erected in the middle of the unfinished 
Capitol." 

Public buildings in the city were 
burned by the British during the War 
of 1812. 

The first U. S. census of the District 
of Columbia was taken in 1800. All of 
the 1810 census records of the district 
are missing. 



Florida 



Capital, Tallahassee 

Maps existing in Spain for nearly intrepid Spanish explorer, reached the 

five centuries indicate that the contours Florida coast as early as 1513. Landing 

of the American continent were already there on Easter Sunday, he called the 

then known there. Ponce de Leon, the new land Florida, from the Spanish 



FLORIDA 25 

name for Easter, Pascua Florida. At- The first railroad in the state was 

tempts to locate Spanish settlers in the built in 1831 and extended from Talla- 

new region a few years later failed hassee to St. Marks. The middle section 

when the colony was routed by the In- of Florida was settled about 1820 by 

dians. former settlers from Virginia, North 

Efforts by the French Huguenots to Carolina, and South Carolina. Most of 

establish colonies on the south bank of the people who came to East Florida from 

the St John's river in 1564 had an en- 1845 to 1860 had lived in Georgia, Ala- 

couraging beginning but ended in dis- bama, and North and South Carolina, 

aster in a couple of years. Florida became a territory of the 

In the 1763 peace treaty of Paris, United States on March 30, 1822, from 

which ended the Seven Years' War, in which time her county records begin, 

which the British and the Prussians She became a state on March 3, 1845, 

fought France, Spain and Austria, all the twenty-seventh state to join the union, 

her North American possessions east of During the eighteen-forties the popu- 

the Mississippi were ceded by France lotion of Florida increased about fifty- 

to Britain. In the same treaty Spain six per cent. The census of 1860 shows 

traded Florida to Britain for Havana, the white population to have increased 

That same year a proclamation by to seventy-eight thousand. At that time 

the King of England established among there were in the state seventy-seven 

other American provinces. East and plantations embracing more than one 

West Florida. The two sections were thousand acres each. The 1860 census 

divided by the Chattahoochee and the also showed that about half the popula- 

Appalachicola rivers. tion was native born while twenty-two 

Twenty years later, the Florida sec- P^i' cent had come from Georgia, elev- 

tions were returned to Spain in the en per cent from South Carolina and five 

treaty ending the Revolutionary War Per cent from North Carolina, 

in 1783. In 1930 of the nearly one and a half 

West Florida was taken by the United million population most of them had 

States in 1810 and 1812, and, after come from the northeastern and the 

many efforts, finally suceeded in 1819 southeastern states, with about 220,000 

in getting Florida by promising to pay from Georgia, 75,000 from Alabama, and 

indemnities to her citizens who had 50,000 from South Carolina, 

been damaged by Spain. The section em- In 1912 a large group of Lutheran 

bracing West Florida was added to Slovaks moved from Cleveland, Ohio, 

Louisiana, Mississippi, and Alabama. onto a large tract of land they had pur- 

In 1821 about eight thousand whites chased in Seminole county where they 
lived in Florida, most of them Spaniards, established a communal agricultural and 
although there were a goodly number of poultry business. They have become 
Anglo-Saxons. As early as 1740 many thoroughly Americanized, take a keen 
British, Scotch and Irish populated the interest in politics, read American peri- 
Cumberland and the Shenandoah val- odicals, and send their sons and daught- 
leys and spread through every southern ers to the state institutions of higher 
state east of the Mississippi. The early learning. 

population in the Deep South was pre- In 1924 a group of Czeck Catholics 
dominantly of Irish ancestry. They were established a small farming community 
the "Okies" of the early days. They built near the northern border of Pasco par- 
Jacksonville in 1822, Quincy in 1825, Mon- ish, about thirty miles north of Tampa, 
ticello in 1828, Marianna and Apalachi- In honor of their great national leader 
ola in 1829, and St. Joseph in 1836. Many they named the town Masaryktown. It 
wealthy people established their homes has a population of about 300 persons, 
in Florida, but their bad treatment of A special population count in 1942 
the Indians caused the Seminole wars showed that among the Florida resi- 
during 1835-42. dents there were about 17,000 of Cana- 

A considerable number of Greeks from dian birth or descent, 7,000 British, 23,000 

southern Greece and the Dodecanese Is- Germans, 40,000 Italians, 5,000 "Conchs", 

lands moved into Florida as early as 1820. Anglo-Saxons of Bahaman descent, so 

As expert sponge-divers they have estab- called because the conch shell fish is 

lished themselves as energetic and sue- an important item in their diet; 5,000 

cessful citizens. Religiously they are af- Swedes, and 2,000 each of Irish, Scotch, 

filiated with the Orthodox Greek Catholic Norwegians, Danes, Russian, Poles, 

Church. Czecks, and Greeks, and smaller num- 



26 



THIRD EDITION OF THE HANDY BOOK FOR GENEALOGISTS 



bers of Finns, Dutch, Belgians, Hun- 
garians, and Turks. 

In 195C Florida had a population of 
2,711,305 oi which 65.5 per cent was 
urban and 34.5 per cent rural. From 
1940 to 1950 Florida advanced from the 
twenty-seventh to the twentieth state 
in rank of population. Her largest cities 
are Miami, 249,276; Jacksonville, 
204,517; Tampa, 124,681; St. Peters- 
burg, 96,738; Orlando, 52,367. 

The largest number of European born 
residents in Florida, in order of num- 
bers ,came from England, Germany, Rus- 
sia, Italy, Sweden, Poland, Austria, 
Greece and Hungary. 

The Bureau of Vital Statistics, State 
Board of Health, P. O. Box 210, Jack- 
sonville, Florida, is custodian of the 
following records: incomplete records 
of births from 1865 to 1917, and births 
from 1917 to date; incomplete records 
of deaths from 1877 to 1917, and deaths 
from 1917, to date; marriages from June 
1927 to date; divorce records also availa- 
ble there. 

Some birth and death records are in 
the city or county health departments 
from 1893 to 1913 in Jacksonville; from 
1897 to 1916 in Pensacola; prior to 1917 
in St. Petersburg, and varied records 
in Ocala, in custody of H. C. Sistrunk, 
Box 502, Ocala, Fla. 



The office of the County Judge of the 
bride's home county has marriage rec- 
ords prior to June 1927. These offices 
also have the records of wills of their 
constituents. 

Divorce records before 1927 are filed 
in the office of the clerk of the Circuit 
Court where divorce was gi'anted; simi- 
lar records before or after 1927 in the 
mentioned office of the Bureau of Vital 
Statistics. 

Naturalization records are in the fed- 
eral circuit and district courts at Pen- 
sacola and Jacksonville. 

Well-indexed records of land claims 
prior to Florida's statehood are at the 
Land Office, Department of Agriculture, 
Tallahassee, Florida. 

The first U. S. Census of Florida was 
taken in 1830. Two census records taken 
by the state in April 1935 and April 
1945 are in the office of the Commissioner 
Oi Agriculture, Tallahassee, Florida. 

Libraries: Fort Lauderdale, (Brow- 
ard), Public Library; Jacksonville, (Du- 
val), Free Public Library, 101 E, Adams 
St.; Miami, (Dade), Public Library, 1 
Biscayne Blvd.; Orlando, (Orange), Al- 
bertson Public Library, 165 E. Central 
Ave.; Tallahasse, (Leon), Florida State Li- 
brary, Supreme Court Bldg.; Tampa 
(Hillsborough), Public Library, 7th Ave. 
<§r Franklin St. 







(Population 


igures to 


Name 


Map 
Index 


Date 
Formed 


Pop. 
By M 


Census 
Reports 
Available 


Alachua 


B3 


1824 


57 


1830-80 


Baker 


A3 


1861 


6 


1870-80 


Bay 


El 


1913 


43 




Benton 


C2 


1843 




1850-80 


Bradford 


A3 


1888 


11 


1870-80 


Brevard 


C4 


1844 


24 


1860r80 


Broward 


E4 


1913 


84 




Calhoun 


Dl 


1836 


8 


1840-80 


Charlotte 


D3 


1921 


4 




Citrus 


B2 


1887 


6 




Clay 


A3 


1858 


14 


1860-80 


Collier 


E3 


1923 


6 




Columbia 


A2 


1832 


18 


1840-80 


Dade 


F4 


1836 


495 


1840-80 


DeSoto 


D3 


1887 


9 




Dixie 


B2 


1921 


4 




Duval 


A3 


1822 


304 


1830-80 


Escambia 


Fl 


1824 


113 


1830-80 


Flagler 
Franklin 


B3 
D2 


1917 
1832 


3 
6 


1840-80 


Gadsden 


Dl 


1823 


36 


1830-80 


Gilchrist 


B2 


1925 


3 





Florida County Histories 

to nearest tliousand, 1950 Census) 



Parent County County Seat 

Duval, St. John Gainsville 

New River Macclenny 

Calhoun, Washington Panama City 

Alachua (Now Hernando) 

"New River" up to 1861 Starke 

"St. Lucas" up to 1855 Titusville 

Dade, Palm Beach Ft. Lauderdale 

Franklin, Washington Blountstown 

DeSoto Punta Gorda 

Hernando Inverness 

Duval Green Cove Springs 

Lee, Monroe Everglades 

Alachua Lake City 

Monroe Miami 

Manatee Arcadia 

Lafayette Cross City 

St. John Jacksonville 

One of two original counties — . Pensacola 

St. John, Volusia Bunnell 

Jackson Apalachicola 

Jackson Quincy 

Alachua Trenton 



FLORIDA 



27 



Map 
Index 



Name 

Glades 

Gulf 

Hamilton 

Hardee 

Hendry 

Hernando 

Highlands 

Hillsborough C2 

Holmes El 

Indian River C4 

Jackson Dl 

Jefferson 

Lafayette 

Lake 



D3 
D2 
A2 
D3 
E3 
C2 
D3 



Lee 

Leon 

Levy 

Liberty 

Madison 

Manatee 

Marion 

Martin 

Monroe 

Mosquito 

Nassau 

Okaloosa 



Al 
A2 
B3 
E3 
Dl 
B2 
Dl 
A2 
D3 
B3 
D4 
F4 
C3 
A3 
El 



Okeechobee D4 

Orange C3 

Osceola C3 

Palm Beach D4 



Pasco 
Pinellas 
Polk 
Putnam 
St. Johns 



C2 
C2 
C3 
B3 
A3 



St. Lucas C4 
St. Lucie D4 
Santa Rosa Fl 
Sarasota D3 
Seminole 
Sumter 
Suwannee A2 
Taylor Al 
Union 
Volusia 
Wakulla 
Walton 



B3 
B3 



A3 
B3 
D2 
El 



Date 
Formed 

1921 
1925 
1827 
1921 
1929 
1843 
1921 
1834 
1848 
1925 
1822 
1827 
1856 
1887 
1887 
1824 
1845 
1855 
1827 
1855 
1844 
1925 
1824 
1824 
1824 
1915 
1917 



Washington El 



1844 
1844 
1842 
1921 
1913 
1853 
1858 
1856 
1921 
1854 
1843 
1824 
1825 



Pop. 
By M 

2 

7 

9 
10 

6 

7 
14 
250 
14 
12 
35 
10 

3 
36 
23 
52 
11 

3 
14 
35 
38 

8 
30 

13 

28 

3 



1824 115 

1887 11 

1909 115 

1887 21 

1911 159 

1861 124 

1849 24 

1821 25 



20 
19 
29 
27 
11 
17 
10 

9 
74 

5 
15 
12 



Census 
Reports 
Available 



3830-80 



1870-80 

1840-80 
1850-80 

1830-80 
1830-80 
1860-80 



1830-80 
1850-80 
1860-80 
1830-80 
1860-80 
1850-80 

1830-80 
1830-80 
1830-80 



1850-80 



1870-80 
1850-80 
1830-80 



1850-80 
1850-80 



1860-80 
1860-80 
1860-80 

1860-80 
1850-80 
1830-80 
1830-80 



Census records are also available for 
(Bradford 1861) 1860. 



Parent County County Seat 

DeSoto Moore Haven 

Calhoun Wewahitchka 

Duval Jasper 

DeSoto Wauchula 

Lee LaBelle 

Alachua Brooksville 

DeSoto Sebring 

Alachua, Monroe Tampa 

Walton, Washington Bonifay 

St. Lucia Vero Beach 

Escambia Marianna 

Leon Monticello 

Madison Mayo 

Orange, Sumter Tavares 

Monroe Ft. Myers 

Gadsden Tallahassee 

Alachua, Monroe Bronson 

Franklin, Gadsden Bristol 

Jefferson Madison 

Hillsboro Bradenton 

Alachua, Hillsboro, Mosquito Ocala 

Palm Beach, St. Lucie Stuart 

St. John Key West 

(Changed to Orange, 1845) 

Duval Fernandina 

Santa Rosa, Walton Crestview 

Osceola, Palm Beach, 

St. Lucie Okeechobee 

(changed from Mosquito, 1845) .... Orlando 

Brevard, Orange Kissimmee 

Dade West Palm Beach 

Hernando Dade City 

Hillsboro Clearwater 

Brevard, Hillsboro Bartow 

Alachua, Marion Palatka 

One of two original 

counties St. Augustine 

(changed to Brevard 1855) 

Brevard Fort Pierce 

Escambia Milton 

Manatee Sarasota 

Orange Sanford 

Marion, Orange Bushnell 

Columbia Live Oak 

Madison Perry 

Bradford Lake Butler 

St. Lucas DeLand 

Leon Crawfordville 

Jackson DeFuniak Springs 

Jackson, Walton Chipley 

the following changed counties: New Rich 



28 THIRD EDITION OF THE HANDY BOOK FOR GENEALOGISTS 



County Map of Florida 



D 




Georgia 

Capital, Atlanta 

For one hundred sixty years or more dom offered in Georgia. Today the Bap- 

the French and the Spanish were playing tist church has the largest member- 

a gigantic game of chess with the domi- ship, followed closely by the Metho- 

nance of Georgia as the prize. This con- dists. There are also large congrega- 

tinued from 1540 to about early in tions of Presbyterians, Lutherans, Chris- 

1700. When South Carolina became a tians, Congregationalists, Catholics, and 

royal province, the land between the the Salvation Army. 

Savannah and the St. Mary's rivers was Georgia became a royal province in 
set aside for a new British colony. 1752. The colony claimed all of the 
It was the practise in England at that land between North Carolina and Flori- 
time to imprison individuals unable to da, and the Atlantic and the Mississippi. 
pay their debts. This practise irked a The first counties in Georgia were 
humanitarian army officer and member formed in 1777. These counties covered 
of Parliament, James Oglethorpe, who only a fraction of the land claimed by- 
conceived the idea of rehabilitating these the province. They covered the section 
poor people by taking them to the New between the Savannah River and the 
World, giving them a tract of land and Oconee and the Altamaha Rivers, and a 
assisting and guiding them in establish- strip about thirty five miles wide ex- 
ing their homes. He induced King George tending from the Altamaha to the Florida 
II to grant to him and twenty other border. In 1790 there were eleven coun- 
men the English territory south of the ties as follows, from north to south: 
Savannah. Franklin, Wilks, Greene, Richmond, 
With thirty-five families he arrived Burke, Washington, Effingham, Chatham, 
there in 1733 and established a com- Liberty Glyn, and Camden. These coun- 
munity at the mouth of the Savannah, ties included the area now occupied by 
which he named after the river. Half- the present counties, as follows: 
way between the mouth of that river Franklin: the south three-fourths of 
and the southern border of South Caro- Stephens, Franklin, Banks, Jackson, all 
Una, they established Augusta in 1734. of Oconee but the southermost tip, all 
In the meantime persecuted Protestants of Clarke but the southern fourth, all 
in Europe had been invited to come to of Madison but the southeast tip. Hart 
the colony. At first Roman Catholics and Elbert. 

were refused to enter the new country. Wilks: the southern tip of Clarke, Ogle- 
About 1738 Swiss, German, Italian, thorpe, the southeastern tip of Madison, 
Scottish Highlanders, Salzburger, and Wilkes, Lincoln, Columbia, McDuffie, 
Moravian settlers had arrived in Georgia. Glascock, Warren, all but west fourth of 
In 1739 another community called Fred- Taliaferro, and small piece of east corner 
erica was established on the south banks of Greene. 

of the Altamaha. Two years later Geor- Greene: small south corner of Oconee, 

gia was divided into two counties - north small west corner of Oglethorpe, all of 

of the Altamaha was called Savannah, Greene but small north triangle, west 

and south of that river Frederica. fourth of Taliaferro, all of Hancock but 

Many of the Moravians had come from south fourth, triangular small northeast 

North Carolina to Spring Place and New corner of Baldwin. 

Echota. Unsuccessful in their desire to Richmond: triangular northeast fourth 

convert the Indians to their faith, the of Jefferson and Richmond. 

Moravians later moved from Georgia to Burke: all of Jefferson but southwest 

Pennsylvania, where they increased rap- triangular quarter and northeast tri- 

idly in Bethlehem and Nazareth. angular quarter, Burke, all of Jenkins 

Many of the Presbyterians who came to but southwest third, and northern tri- 

Georgia as Scottish Highlanders settled angular half of Screven. 

in Darien, which they renamed New In- Washington: south fourth of Hancock, 

verness. In 1752 a group of Massachus- triangular small southeast corner of 

setts Puritans came to Midway. Baldwin, Washington, southwest quarter 

The colony early became a haven for of Jefferson, Johnson, east third of 

ail persecuted religionists and many came Laurns, east triangular half of Mont- 

from many countries to enjoy the free- gomery, Emanuel, southeast quarter of 

29 



30 



THIRD EDITION OF THE HANDY BOOK FOR GENEALOGISTS 



Jenkins, Bulloch, Bryan, the west half 
of Tattnall, and Toombs. 

Effingham: the southern half of Scre- 
ven, and Effingham. 

Chatham: Chatham, and southern half 
of Bryan. 

Liberty: eastern half of Tattnall, 
Liberty, Long, and Mcintosh. 

Glyn: eastern half of Wayne, Glynn, 
and northeastern third of Brantley. 

Camden: southeastern third of Brant- 
ley, eastern half of Charlton, and Cam- 
den. 

Today Georgia has 159 counties. Only 
nineteen states have a larger area. 

In 1798 the Territory of Mississippi was 
created from the western half of Geor- 
gia. Later that territory was formed 
into the states of Alabama and Mississip- 
pi. 

Georgia ratified the federal constitu- 
tion on January 2, 1788, and thus be- 
came the fourth state in the union. 

Many settlers in Virginia and the Caro- 
linas were attracted to Georgia by the 
early land lotteries. Families who had 
lived in the territory for at least one 
year were permitted to draw for acre- 
ages as large as 400 acres. Such lotteries, 
the participant lists of which are now 
in the office of the Secretary of State, 
were held in 1803, 1806, 1819, 1827, and 
1832. 

Georgia has the thirteenth largest pop- 
ulation among the states, 3,444,570, of 
which 45.3 per cent is urban and 54.7 
per cent rural. Its largest cities are 
Atlanta, 331,314; Savannah, 119,638; Co- 
lumbus, 79,611; Augusta, 71,508; Macon, 
70,252. 

Division of Vital Statistics, State De- 



partment of Public Health, 1 Hunter 
St., S. W., Atlanta 3, Ga., has on file 
birth and death records since Jan. 1, 
1919. Atlanta and Savannah city health 
offices similar records of earlier dates. 

Each county clerk has records of mar- 
riages performed in that county. 

Records of divorce actions are kept 
by Superior Court clerk in county where 
granted. 

Naturalization records are filed in the 
office of the Superior Court in county 
where hearing was held. Similar records 
in the office of the clerk of the federal 
district courts in Atlanta and Savannah. 

The deeds to lands are recorded in the 
office of the clerk of the Superior 
Court where land is located. Abstracts of 
land grants are furnished for a fee in 
the office of the clerk of the Secretary 
of State. 

Wills are recorded in the office of 
the clerk of the Superior Court in county 
where testator resided. 

Libraries: Albany, (Dougherty), Carne- 
gie Public Library, 215 No. Jackson St.; 
Atlanta, (Fulton), Public Library, 126 
Carnegie Way, (Genealogy); Georgia 
State Dept. of Archives and History Li- 
brary, Rhodes Memorial Hall, 1516 Peach- 
tree Rd., has thousands of valuable early 
records, deeds, and marriage certificates, 
and personal histories of early residents, 
also many volumes of Georgia colonial 
history; Columbus, (Muscogee), W. C. 
Bradley Memorial Library, (Chatta- 
hoochee Valley History); Macon, (Bibb), 
Washington Memorial Library, 1190 
Washington Ave.; Savannah, (Chatham), 
Georgia Historical Society Library, 501 
Whitaker St.; Savannah Public Library, 
2002 Bull St. 



Georgia County Histories 

(Population figures to nearest thousand, 1950 Census) 



Name 



Census 
Map Date Pop. Reports 

Index Formed By M Available 



Appling 


D3 


1818 


14 


1820-80 


Atkinson 


E3 


1917 


7 




Bacon 


D3 


1914 


9 




Baker 


El 


1825 


6 


1830-80 


Baldwin 


C2 


1803 


30 


1830-80 


Banks 


A2 


1858 


7 


1860-80 


Barrow 


B2 


1914 


13 




Bartow 


Al 


1832 


27 


1870-80 


Ben Hill 


D2 


1906 


15 




Berrien 


E2 


1856 


14 


1860-80 


Bibb 


C2 


1822 


114 


1830-80 


Bleckley 


C2 


1912 


9 




Brantley 


E3 


1920 


6 




Brooks 


E2 


1851 


18 


1860-80 



Parent County County Seat 

Creek Indian Lands Baxley 

Coffee Pearson 

Appling, Pearce Alma 

Early Newton 

Creek Indian Lands Milledgeville 

Franklin Homer 

Jackson, Walton Winder 

Cass Cartersville 

Irwin, Wilcox Fitzgerald 

Lowndes Nashville 

Jones, Monroe Macon 

Pulaski Cochran 

Chalton, Pierce Nahunta 

Lowndes, Thomas Quitman 



GEORGIA 



31 





Map 


Date 


Pop. 


Name 


Index 


Formed 


By M 


Bryan 


D4 


1793 


6 


Bulloch 


C4 


1796 


25 


Burke 


C3 


1777 


23 


Butts 


B2 


1825 


9 


Calhoun 


Dl 


1854 


9 


Camden 


E4 


1777 


7 


Campbell 


Bl 


1828 




Candler 


C3 


1914 


8 


Carroll 


Bl 


1826 


34 


Catoosa 


Al 


1853 


15 


Charlton 


E3 


1854 


5 


Chatham 


D4 


1777 


151 


Chattahoochee CI 1854 


12 


Chattooga 


Al 


1838 


21 


Cherokee 


A2 


1831 


21 


Clarke 


B2 


1801 


37 


Clay 


Dl 


1854 


6 


Clayton 


B2 


1858 


23 


Clinch 


E3 


1850 


6 


Cobb 


Bl 


1832 


62 


Coffee 


D3 




24 


Colquitt 


E2 


1856 


34 


Columbia 


B3 


1790 


10 


Cook 


E2 


1918 


12 


Coweta 


Bl 


1826 


28 


Crawford 


C2 


1822 


6 


Crisp 


D2 


1905 


18 


Dade 


Al 


1837 


7 


Dawson 


A2 


1857 


4 


Decatur 


El 


1823 


24 


DeKalb 


B2 


1822 


136 


Dodge 


D3 


1870 


18 


Dooly 


D2 


1821 


14 


Dougherty 


D2 


1852 


44 


Douglas 


Bl 


1870 


12 


Early 


El 


1818 


17 


Echols 


E3 


1858 


2 


Effingham 


C4 


1777 


9 


Elbert 


B3 


1790 


19 


Emanuel 


C3 


1812 


20 


Evans 


D4 


1914 


7 


Fannin 


A2 


1854 


15 


Fayette 


B2 


1821 


8 


Floyd 


Al 


1832 


63 


Forsyth 


A2 


1832 


11 


Franklin 


A2 


1784 


14 


Fulton 


Bl 


1853 


474 


Gilmer 


A2 


1832 


10 


Glascock 


B3 


1857 


4 


Glynn 


E4 


1777 


29 


Gordon 


Al 


1850 


19 


Grady 


E2 


1905 


19 


Greene 


B3 


1786 


13 


Gwinnett 


B2 


1818 


32 


Habersham 


A2 


1818 


17 


Hall 


A2 


1818 


40 


Hancock 


B3 


1793 


11 


Haralson 


Bl 


1856 


15 



Census 
Reports 

Available Parent County County Seat 

1820-80 Effingham, Liberty Pembroke 

1860-80 Creek Indian Lands Statesboro 

1820-80 St. George Parish Waynesboro 

1830-80 Henry, Monroe Jackson 

1860-80 Baker & Early Morgan 

1820-80 St. Mary, St. Thomas Woodbine 

1830-80 Carroll, Coweta 

Merged Fulton 1932 

Bulloch, Emanuel Metter 

1830-80 Indian Lands Carrollton 

1860-80 Walker Ringgold 

1860-80 Wayne, Appling Folkston 

1820-80 St. Phillip Savannah 

1860-80 Muscogee, Randolph Cusseta 

1840-80 Floyd Summerville 

1840-80 Cherokee Lands Canton 

1820-80 Jackson Athens 

1860-80 Early, Randolph Ft. Gaines 

1860-80 'Fayette, Henry Jonesboro 

1850-80 Wayne Homerville 

1840-80 Cherokee Marietta 

1860-80 Douglas 

1860-80 Irwin, Thomas Moultrie 

1820-80 Richmond Appling 

1820-80 Berrien Adel 

1830-80 Indian Lands Newman 

1830-80 Houston Knoxville 

Dooly Cordele 

1840-80 Walker Trenton 

1860-80 Forsythe, Gilmer Dawsonville 

1830-80 Early Bainbridge 

1830-80 Fayette, Henry Decatur 

1870-80 Montgomery, Pulaski Eastman 

1830-80 Indian Lands Vienna 

1860-80 Baker Albany 

Carroll Douglasville 

1820-80 Creek Indian Lands Blakely 

1860-80 Appling, Irwin Statenville 

1820-80 St. Mathews '. Springfield 

1820-80 Wilkes Elberton 

1820-80 Montgomery Swainsboro 

Bulloch, Tattnall Claxton 

1860-80 Gilmer, Union Blue Ridge 

1830-SO Indian Lands Fayetteville 

1840-80 Cherokee Rome 

1840-80 Cherokee Gumming 

1830-80 Cherokee Lands Carnesville 

1860-80 DeKalb Atlanta 

1840-80 Cherokee Ellijay 

1860-80 Warren Gibson 

1820-80 St. David, St. Patrick Brunswick 

1850-80 Cass, Floyd Calhoun 

Decatur ,Thomas Cairo 

1820-80 Washington Greensboro 

1820-80 Cherokee Lands Lawrenceville 

1820-80 Cherokee Lands Clarkesville 

1820-80 Cherokee Lands Gainesville 

1820-80 Greene, Washington Sparta 

1860-80 Carroll, Polk Buchanan 



32 



THIRD EDITION OF THE HANDY BOOK FOR GENEALOGISTS 



Harris 


CI 


1827 


11 


1830-80 


Hart 


A3 


1853 


14 


1860-80 


Heard 


Bl 


1830 


7 


1840-80 


Henry 


B2 


1821 


21 


1830-80 


Houston 


C2 


1821 


16 


1830-80 


Irwin 


D2 


1818 


12 


1820-80 


Jackson 


B2 


1796 


19 


1820-80 


Jasper 


B2 


1812 


7 


1820-80 


Jeff Davis 


D2 


1905 


9 




Jefferson 


C3 


1796 


19 


1820-80 


Jenkins 


C3 


1905 


10 




Johnson 


C3 


1858 


10 


1860-80 


Jones 


02 


1807 


8 


1820-80 


Lamar 


02 


1920 


10 




Lanier 


E3 


1919 


5 




Laurens 


03 


1807 


33 


1820-80 


Lee 


D2 


1827 


7 


1830-80 


Liberty 


D4 


1777 


8 


1820-80 


Lincoln 


B3 


1796 


6 


1820-80 


Long 


D4 


1920 


4 




Lowndes 


E2 


1835 


35 


1830-80 


Lumpkin 


A2 


1832 


7 


1840-80 


McDuffie 


B3 


1870 


11 


1880 


Mcintosh 


D4 


1793 


6 


1820-80 


Macon 


02 


1837 


14 


1840-80 


Madison 


B3 


1811 


12 


1820-80 


Marion 


01 


1827 


7 


1830-80 


Meriwether 


01 


1827 


21 


1830-80 


Miller 


El 


1856 


9 


1860-80 


Milton 


Bl 


1857 




1860-80 


Mitchell 


E2 


1857 


23 


1860-80 


Monroe 


02 


1821 


11 


1830-80 


Montgomery D3 


1793 


8 


1820-80 


Morgan 


B2 


1807 


12 


1820-80 


Murray 


Al 


1832 


11 


1840-80 


Muscogee 


01 


1826 


118 


1830-80 


Newton 


B2 


1821 


20 


1830-80 


Oconee 


B2 


1875 


7 




Ogelthorpe 


B3 


1783 


10 


1820-80 


Paulding 


Bl 


1832 


12 


1840-80 


Peach 


02 


1924 


12 




Pickens 


A2 


1853 


9 


1860-80 


Pierce 


E3 


1857 


11 


1860-80 


Pike 


02 


1822 


8 


1830-80 


Polk 


Bl 


1851 


31 


1860-80 


Pulaski 


D2 


1808 


9 


1820-80 


Putnam 


B2 


1807 


8 


1820-80 


Quitman 


Dl 


1858 


3 


1860-80 


Rabun 


A2 


1819 


7 


1830-80 


Randolph 


Dl 


1828 


14 


1830-80 


Richmond 


B3 


1777 


109 


1820-80 


Rockdale 


B2 


1870 


8 




Schley 


D2 


1857 


4 


1860-80 


Screven 


04 


1793 


18 


1820-80 


Seminole 


El 


1920 


8 




Spalding 


B2 


1851 


31 


1860-80 


Stephens 


A2 


1905 


17 




Stewart 


Dl 


1830 


9 


1840-80 


Sumter 


D2 


1831 


24 


1840-80 


Talbot 


01 


1827 


8 


1830-80 


Taliaferro 


B3 


1825 


5 


1830-80 



Muscogee Hamilton 

Elbert, Franklin Hartwell 

Oarroll, Ooweta Franklin 

Indian Lands McDonough 

Indian Lands Perry 

Indian Lands Ocilla 

Franklin Jefferson 

Baldwin Monticello 

Appling, Ooffee Hazelhurst 

Burke, Warren Louisville 

Bullock, Burke, Scheven Millen 

Emanuel, Laurens Wrightsville 

Baldwin Gray 

Monroe, Pike Baruesville 

Berrien, Lounders Lakeland 

Washington, Wilkinson Dublin 

Indian Lands Leesburg 

St, Andrew, St. James Hinesville 

Wilkes Lincolnton 

Liberty Ludowici 

Irwin Valdosta 

Oherokee Dahlonega 

Columbia, Warren Thomson 

Liberty Darien 

Dooly, Houston, Lee Oglethorpe 

Olarke , Elbert Danielsville 

Troup, Lee, Muscogee Buena Vista 

Troup Greenville 

Baker, Early Colquitt 

Merged Fulton 1911 

Baker Camilla 

Indian Lands Forsyth 

Washington, Wilkinson Mt. Vernon 

Baldwin Madison 

Cherokee Chatsworth 

Creek Lands Columbus 

Baldwin, Henry, Walton Covington 

Olarke Watkinsville 

Wilkes Lexington 

Oherokee Dallas 

Houston, Macon Fort Valley 

Cherokee, Gilmer Jasper 

Appling, Ware Blackshear 

Monroe Zebulon 

Paulding Cedartown 

Laurens Hawkinsville 

Baldwin Eatonton 

Randolph, Stewart Georgetown 

Cherokee Lands Clayton 

Lee Outhbert 

St. Paul Parish Augusta 

Henry Conyers 

Macon, Marion, Sumter Ellaville 

Burke, Effingham Sylvania 

Decatur Donalsonville 

Henry, Pike Griffin 

Franklin, Habersham Toccoa 

Randolph Lumpkin 

Lee Americus 

Muscogee, Troup Talbotton 

Green, Hancock, 

Warren, Wilkes Orawfordville 



GEORGIA 



33 



Name 



Census 
Map Date fop. Reports 

Index Formed By M Available 



Tattnall 


D3 


1801 


16 


1820-80 


Taylor 


02 


1853 


9 


1860-80 


Telfair 


D3 


1807 


13 


1820-80 


Terrell 


D2 


1856 


14 


1860-80 


Thomas 


E2 


1825 


34 


1830-80 


Tift 


D2 


1905 


23 




Toombs 


D3 


1905 


17 




Towns 


A2 


1856 


5 


1860-80 



Parent County County Seat 

Montgomery Reidsville 

Orawford, Macon, 

Talbot, Monroe Butler 

Wilkinson McRae 

Lee, Randolph Dawson 

Decatur, Irwin Thomasville 

Berrien, Worth Tifton 

Emanuel, Tattanall, 

Montgomery Lyons 

Rabun, Union Hiawassee 



County Map of Georgia 




34 



THIRD EDITION OF THE HANDY BOOK FOR GENEALOGISTS 



Name 


Map 
Index 


Dale 
Formed 


Pop. 
By M 


Census 

Reports 

Available 


Treutlen 


C3 


1917 


7 




Troup 


CI 


1826 


50 


1830-80 


Turner 


D2 


1905 


10 




Twiggs 


C2 


1809 


8 


1830-80 


Union 


A2 


1832 


7 


1840-80 


Upson 


C2 


1824 


25 


1830-80 


Walker 


Al 


1833 


38 


1840-80 


Walton 


B2 


1818 


20 


1820-80 


Ware 


E3 


1824 


30 


1830-80 


Warren 


B3 


1793 


9 


1820-80 


Washington 


C3 


1784 


21 


1820-80 


Wayne 


D4 


1803 


14 


1820-80 


Webster 


Dl 


1856 


4 


1860-80 


Wheeler 


D3 


1912 


7 




White 


A2 


1857 


6 


1860-80 


Whitfield 


Al 


1851 


34 


1860-80 


Wilcox 


D2 


1857 


10 


1860-80 


Wilkes 


B3 


1777 


12 


1820-80 


Wilkinson 


C2 


1803 


10 


1820-80 


Worth 


D2 


1852 


19 


1860-80 


♦Census Notes - 


- Bartow census 1870 



Parent County County Seat 

Emanuel, Montgomery Soperton 

Indian Lands LaGrange 

Dooly, Irwin, Wilcox Ashburn 

Wilkinson Jeffersonville 

Cherokee Blairsville 

Crawford, Pike Thomaston 

Murray LaFayette 

Cherokee Lands Monroe 

Irwin Waycross 

Wilkes Warrenton 

Indian Lands Sandersville 

Indian Lands Jesup 

Randolph Preston 

Montgomery Alamo 

Habersham, Lumpkin Cleveland 

Murray Dalton 

Dooly, Irwin, Pulaski Abbeville 

Washington Washington 

Creek Cession Irwinton 

Dooly, Irwin Sylvester 

previously, 1840-1860, as Cass. 



Idaho 



Capital, Boise 



Idaho was the last state to be carved 
from the Oregon Territory. When Idaho 
became a territory on March 3, 1863, 
it included all of Montana and nearly 
all of Wyoming. Montana became a 
territory in 1864 and Wyoming in 1868. 
The six original counties of Idaho were 
formed between 1861 and 1865. It v/as 
admitted as a state July 3, 1890, the 
forty-third state in the union. 

The southern part of the state, which 
borders Utah was the first section to 
be settled. Mormon emigrants from 
northern Europe were the first to estab- 
lish permanent settlements in the re- 
gion. 

A mining boom in 1860 attracted 
people from the East and Mid- West to 
the mountainous Idaho valleys. The 
later construction of large irrigation 
systems and districts around the long 
Snake River section about 1910 brought 
many western and mid-western farm 
families to take advantage of the farm- 
ing opportunities in the new state. 

Catholic and Protestant churches are 
represented in most Idaho communities, 
but more than half of its church mem- 
bership belongs to the Church of Jesus 
Christ of Latter-day Saints. 

The prevailing nationalities among 
Idaho residents, in order of dominance, 



are Swedes, Germans, English, Norwe- 
gians, Danes, Russians and Italians. It 
is interesting to note that the largest 
colony of Basques in the United States 
i3 situated around Boise, Idaho. Over 
the years, thousands of them have come 
here to herd the large flocks of sheep 
grazing over Idaho's vast mountainous 
country. Less than a million Basques 
live in the French Pyrenees and eastern 
Spain. Their language, always a puzzle 
to linguists, is an old one, entirely 
unlike any other in the world. 

In population Idaho ranks forty-third 
among the states. The 1950 census gave 
it 588,637 inhabitants. Although this is 
an increase of about 64,000 since the 
1940 census, it has gone back one 
step in the population rank in the last 
ten year. The population distribution 
is 42.9 per cent urban, and 57.1 per 
cent rural. 

The largest cities are Boise, 34,393; 
Pocatello, 26,131; Idaho Falls, 19,218; 
Twin Falls, 17,600 ; Nampa, 16.185; 
Lewiston, 12,985; Coeur D' Alene, 12,198. 

The Division of Vital Statistics, Box 
640, Boise, Idaho, has information on 
births and deaths from July 1, 1911. 

The county recorder has records of 
marriages solemnized in his county. No 
marriage licenses were required before 



IDAHO 



35 



March 11. 1895. 

The county clerk has records of births 
in that county since 1907. Wills and pro- 
bate matters are also filed in the clerk's 
office. 

All records pertaining to land trans- 
actions are in custody of the county re- 
corder in the respective county court 



houses. 

The first U. S. Census of Idaho was 
taken in 1870. 

Libraries — Boise, (Ada), Public Li- 
brary, 815 Washington St.; Nampa, (Can- 
yon), Carnegie Library; Pocatello, (Ban- 
nock), Public Library; Twin Falls, (Twin 
Falls), Public Library, 434 Second St., E. 



Idaho County Histories 

(Population figures to nearest thousand, 1950 Census) 



Name 



Census 
Map Date Pop. Reports 

Index Formed By M Available 

1870-80 



1870-80 



Ada 


Dl 


1864 


71 


Adams 


CI 


1911 


3 


Alturas 




1863 




Bannock 


E4 


1893 


42 


Bear Lake 


E4 


1875 


7 


Benewah 


B3 


1915 


6 


Bingham 


D4 


1885 


23 


Blaine 


D2 


1895 


5 


Boise 


CI 


1863 


2 


Bonner 


A3 


1907 


15 


Bonneville 


D4 


1911 


30 


Boundary 


A3 


1915 


6 


Butte 


D3 


1917 


3 


Camas 


D2 


1917 


1 


Canyon 


Dl 


1891 


54 


Caribou 


D4 


1919 


6 


Cassia 


E3 


1879 


15 


Clark 


C4 


1919 


9 


Clearwater 


A2 


1911 


8 


Custer 


C2 


1881 


3 


Elmore 


D2 


1889 


7 


Franklin 


D4 


1913 


10 


Fremont 


C4 


1893 


9 


Gem 


CI 


1915 


9 


Gooding 


D2 


1913 


11 


Idaho 


B2 


1862 


11 


Jefferson 


D4 


1913 


10 


Jerome 


E2 


1919 


12 


Kootenai* 


B3 


1864 


25 


Latah** 


Al 


1888 


21 


Lemhi 


C3 


1869 


6 


Lewis 


Al 


1911 


4 


Lincoln 


D2 


1895 


4 


Madison 


D4 


1913 


9 


Minidoka 


E3 


1913 


10 


Nez Perce 


Al 


1861 


23 


Oneida 


E3 


1864 


4 


Owyhee 


El 


1863 


6 


Payette 


CI 


1917 


12 


Power 


E3 


1913 


4 


Shoshone 


B4 


1861 


23 


Teton 


D4 


1915 


3 



1870-80 



1870-80 



1870-80 



1870-80 



1870-80 



1870-80 



Parent County County Seat 

Boise Boise 

Washington Council 

Original county; discontinued 

Oneida, Bear Lake Pocatello 

Oneida Paris 

Kootenai St. Maries 

Oneida Blackfoot 

Alturas Hailey 

Original county Idaho City 

Kootenai Sandpoint 

Bingham Idaho Falls 

Bonner Bonner's Ferry 

Bingham, Blaine, Jefferson Arco 

Mackay 

Blaine Fairfield 

Selby 

Owyhee, Ada Caldwell 

Bannock, Oneida Soda Springs 

Oneida Burley 

Albion 

Fremont Dubois 

Nez Perce Orofino 

Alturas Challis 

Alturus Mountain Home 

Oneida Preston 

Bingham, Lemhi St. Anthony 

Boise, Canyon Emmett 

Lincoln Gooding 

Original county Grangeville 

Fremont Rexburg 

Rigby 

Gooding, Lincoln Jerome 

Nez Perce Coeur d'Alene 

Kootenai Moscow 

Idaho Salmon 

Nez Perce Nez Perce 

Alturas Shoshone 

Fremont Rexburg 

Lincoln Rupert 

Original county Lewiston 

Original county Malad 

Original county Murphy 

Canyon Payette 

Bingham, Blaine, Oneida .... American Falls 

Original county Wallace 

Madison Driggs 



36 THIRD EDITION OF THE HANDY BOOK FOR GENEALOGISTS 

Census 
Map Date Pop. Reports 

Name Index Formed By M Available Parent County County Scat 

Twin Falls E2 1907 41 Cassia Twin Falls 

Valley C2 1917 4 Boise, Idaho Cascade 

Washington CI 1879 9 Boise Weiser 

♦Kootenai county was created in 1864, but not organized or officered until 1881. 
**Latah County was created and organized by U. S. Congressional enactment, 
said to be the only county in the United States so created. 



County Map of Idaho 



CLEARWATER 



lEZ PERCE 

LEWIS 




OWYHEE 



TWIN FALLS 



Illinois 

capital, Springfield 

Illinois, the transportation center of third Illinois county, came into existanci> 

the United States, was visited by the in 1814. And north of that county, Clark 

French explorers in the late sixteen County, also along the Wabash, was 

hundreds. Its fertile land appealed to formed in 1819. Those four counties were 

members of various early expeditions the forerunners of 98 others to be formed 

passing through during their exploring in Illinois. The last two of her present 

or hunting or war activities. Many of 102 counties were formed in 1859, Ford 

them returned later and farmed the and Douglas. 

deep, rich soil along its many rivers Illinois became the twenty-first state 

and streams. in the union when she gained state- 

The southern part was the first to hood in 1818. She has a population of 

be occupied by permanent settlers. They 8,712,176; 77.6 per cent urban and 22.4 

came from the earlier southern states, rural. She ranks fourth in population 

including North Carolina, Virginia and among the states, although in 1940 she 

Kentucky. Others came from Maryland ranked third, with a population almost 

and Pennsylvania. This condition existed a million less than in 1950. Her largest 

until some years after Illinois had be- cities are Chicago, 3,620,962; Peoria, 

come a state. 111,856; Rockford, 92,927; East St. Louis, 

Settlers began to arrive in the north- 82,295; Springfield, 81,628. 
ern section about 1825. Generally they A communication from the Depart- 

came from the New England states. ment of Public Health at Springfield 

With the beginning of the industrial says, "Illinois has no provisions for giv- 

growth of Illinois, European emigrants ing genealogical service from the offic- 

flocked there by the thousands every ial birth and death records. Our law 

month. They furnished the man-power authorizes the State Department of Pub- 

for the factories and industrial plants lie Health, the County Clerks, and the 

that sprung up like mushrooms in the Local Registrars to issue a certified copy 

Lake Michigan section. That is one of a specified record at the statutory fee 

reason why more than forty per cent of $1.00 per copy. The law forbids us to 

of the state population centers in that issue any information from the records 

area. They came from Ireland, and except by certified copy as described, 
the south European countries, Germans "Marriage records are in sole cus- 

flocked there until they form about tody of the County Clerks. Births and 

one-fourth of the population. They are deaths from 1877 to 1916 were regis- 

closely crowded by the Poles, Italians, tered (if at all) by the County Clerks. 

Swedes and Russians. In a few counties there are some records 

Illinois was part of the Northwest existing prior to 1877, also in some 

Territory which the United States ob- cities. 

tained after the Revolutionary War "After 1916, all original birth and 

irom Great Britain to whom it hau oeen death certificates have been deposited 

ceded by France in 1763. It became with this department. A copy of each 

part of the United States in 1783. It is deposited with the County Clerk of 

was organized as American territory the county where the event occurred, 
in 1787. It included the land north and "Such genealogical research as is done 

west of the Ohio River, east of the in the State offices is done in the Illinois 

Mississippi, and south of Canada, Illi- State Archives from its miscellaneous 

nois became the third of five territories historical records. For further informa- 

and eventual states formed from that tion about the services from the Archives 

area. That was in 1818. communicate with The State Archivist, 

St. Clair became the first county or- Archive Building, Springfield, Illinois, 
ganized in the Illinois Territory. That "The best source of the kind of in- 

was in 1790. It extended along the formation you request is to be found in 

Kaskaskia River. Five years later an- a publication by the Historical Records 

other county was formed, Randolph, Survey Project of the W. P. A. in May, 

situated farther south along the Kas- 1941, entitled, "Guide to Public Vital 

kaskia and the Mississippi. Farther east, Statistics Records in Illinois," (137 pp. 

along the Wabash, Edwards county, the mimeographed)." 

37 



38 



THIRD EDITION OF THE HANDY BOOK FOR GENEALOGISTS 



The United States Census Records 
are intact from 1820 on. Some sched- 
ules are in the State Library in Spring- 
field. 

Counties with a population of more 
than 70,000 have probate courts, in 
other counties probate matters and 
wills are handled by the County Clerk. 
Matters pertaining to real estate are in 
the offices of the County Recorder of 
Deeds. 

The Newberry Library in Chicago 
one of the largest in the west, has val- 
uable genealogical volumes. In Spring- 
field are the State Historical and the 
State libraries. In most of the counties 
in the state are libraries with more 
or less genealogical information . 



Libraries: Bloomington, (McLean), 
Withers Public Library, 202 E. Wash- 
ington St.; Chicago, (Cook), Chicago 
Historical Society Library, North Ave. 
&. Clark St; Public Library, 78 E. Wash- 
ington St.; A. N. Marquis C. Library, 
210 E. Ohio, (Biographical records); New- 
berry Library, 60 W. Walton; U. S. Rail- 
road Retirement Board Library, 844 Rush 
St.; University of Chicago Library, Zone 
37; Decatur, (Macon), Public Library, 
457 N. Main St.; East St. Louis. (St. 
Clair), Public Library, 9th & State St.; 
Peoria, (Peoria), Public Library, 111. No, 
Monroe St.; Rockford, (Winnebago), 215 
N. Wyman St.; Springfield, (Sangamon), 
Illinois State Historical Library, Centen- 
nial Bldg., (Genealogy). 



Illinois County Histories 

(Population figures to nearest thousand, 1950 Census) 



Name 


Map 
Index 


Date 
Formed 


Pop. 
By M 


Census 
Reports 
Available 


Adams 


CI 


1825 


65 


1830-80 


Alexander 


E3 


1819 


20 


1820-80 


Bond 


D2 


1817 


14 


1820-80 


Boone 


A3 


1837 


17 


1840-80 


Brown 


C2 


1839 


7 


1840-80 


Bureau 


B2 


1837 


38 


1840-80 


Calhoun 


CI 


1825 


7 


1830-80 


Carroll 


A2 


1839 


19 


1840-80 


Cass 


C2 


1837 


15 


1840-80 


Champaign 


C3 


1833 


106 


1840-80 


Christian 


C3 


1839 


39 


1840-80 


Clark 


C4 


1819 


17 


1820-80 


Clay 


D3 


1824 


17 


1830-80 


Clinton 


D2 


1824 


23 


1830-80 


Coles 


C3 


1830 


40 


1840-80 


Cook 


A4 


1831 


4508 


1840-80 


Crawford 


D4 


1815 


21 


1820-80 


Cumberland C3 


1843 


10 


1850-80 


Dane 




1839 






DeKalb 


A3 


1837 


41 


1840-80 


DeWitt 


A3 


1839 


17 


1840-80 


Douglas 


C3 


1859 


17 


1860-80 


DuPage 


A3 


1839 


155 


1840-80 


Edgar 


C4 


1823 


23 


1830-80 


Edwards 


D3 


1814 


9 


1820-80 


Effingham 


D3 


1831 


22 


1840-80 


Fayette 


D3 


1821 


25 


1830-80 


Ford 


B3 


1859 


16 


1860-80 


Franklin 


E3 


1818 


49 


1820-80 


Fulton 


B2 


1823 


44 


1830-80 


Gallatin 


E3 


1812 


10 


1830-80 


Greene 


C2 


1821 


19 


1830-80 


Grundy 


B3 


1841 


19 


1850-80 


Hamilton 


D3 


1821 


12 


1830-80 


Hancock 


Bl 


1825 


26 


1830-80 


Hardin 


E3 


1839 


8 


1840-80 



Parent County County Seat 

Pike Quincy 

Unorg. Terr Cairo 

Madison Greenville 

Winnebago Belvidere 

Schuyler Mt. Sterling 

Putnam Princeton 

Pike Hardin 

Jo Daviess Mt. Carroll 

Morgan Virginia 

Vermillion Urbana 

Sangamon Taylorville 

Crawford Marshall 

Wayne, Fayette Louisville 

Washington, Bond, Fayette, 

Crawford Carlyle 

Clark Charleston 

Putnam Chicago 

Edwards Robinson 

Coles Toledo 

Name changed in 1840 to Christian County. 

Kane Sycamore 

Mason, McLean Clinton 

Coles : Tuscola 

Cook Wheaton 

Clark Paris 

Madison, Gallatin Albion 

Fayette, Crawford Effingham 

Bond, Wayne, Clark, Jefferson .... Vandalia 

Unorg. Terr Paxton 

White Benton 

Pike Lewiston 

Randolph Shawneetown 

Madison Carrollton 

LaSalle Morris 

White McLeansboro 

Unorg. Terr Carthage 

Pope Elizabethtown 



ILLINOIS 



39 



Census 

Map Date Pop. Reports 

Name Index Formed By M Available Parent County County Seat 

Henderson Bl 1841 8 1850-80 Warren Oquawka 

Henry B2 1825 46 1830-80 Knox Cambridge 

Iroquois B3 1833 32 1840-80 Unorg. Terr Watseka 

Jackson E2 1816 38 1820-80 Randolph, Johnson Murphysboro 

Jasper D3 1831 12 1840-80 Clay, Crawford Newton 

Jefferson D3 1819 36 1820-80 Edwards, White Mt. Vernon 

Jersey D2 1839 15 1840-80 Greene Jerseyville 

JoDaviess A2 1827 21 1830-80 Henry, Putnam Galena 

Johnson E3 1812 9 1820-80 Randolph Vienna 

Kane A4 1836 150 1840-80 LaSalle Geneva 

Kankakee B3 1835 74 1860-80 Iroquois, Will Kankakee 

Kendall A3 1841 12 1850-80 LaSalle, Kane Yorkville 

Knox B2 1825 54 1830-80 Unorg. Terr Galesburg 

Lake A3 1839 179 1840-80 McHenry Waukegan 

LaSalle B3 1831 101 1840-80 Putnam Ottawa 

Lawrence D4 1821 21 1830-80 Crawford, Edwards Lawrenceville 

Lee A3 1839 36 1840-80 Ogle Dixon 

1837 38 1840-80 LaSalle, McLean Pontiac 

1839 31 1840-80 Sangamon Lincoln 

1830 28 1830-80 Schuyler Macomb 

1836 51 1840-80 Cook Woodstock 

1830 77 1840-80 Tazewell, Unorg. Terr Bloomlngton 

1839 98 1830-80 Shelby Decatur 

1829 44 1830-80 Madison Carlinville 

1812 182 1820-80 St. Clair Edwardsville 

1823 42 1830-80 Fayette, Jefferson Salem 

1839 13 1840-80 Putnam Lacon 

1841 15 1850-80 Tazewell Havana 

1843 14 1850-80 Pope, Jefferson Metropolis 

1839 10 1840-80 Sangamon Petersburg 

1825 17 1830-80 Unorg. Terr Aledo 

1816 13 1820-80 Randolph, St. Clair Waterloo 

Montgomery C2 1821 32 1830-80 Bond, Madison Hillsboro 

Morgan C2 1823 36 1830-80 Sangamon Jacksonville 

Moultrie C3 1843 13 1850-80 Shelby, Mason Sullivan 

Ogle A3 1836 33 1840-80 JoDaviess Oregon 

1825 174 1830-80 Fulton Peoria 

1827 22 1830-80 Randolph, Jackson Pinckneyville 

1841 14 1850-80 DeWitt, Macon Monticello 

1821 22 1830-80 Madison, Bond, Clark Pittsfield 

1816 6 1820-80 Johnson Golconda 

1843 14 1850-80 Johnson Mound City 

1825 5 1830-80 JoDaviess Hennepin 

1795 32 1820-80 NW Territory Chester 

1814 17 1850-80 Clay, Lawrence Olney 

1833 134 1840-80 JoDaviess Rock Island 

1790 206 1820-80 NW Territory Belleville 

1847 33 1850-80 Gallatin Harrisburg 

1821 131 1830-80 Bond, Madison Springfield 

1825 10 1830-80 Pike, Fulton Rushville 

1839 7 1840-80 Morgan Winchester 

1827 24 1830-80 Fayette Shclbyville 

1839 9 1840-80 Knox, Putnam Toulon 

1837 42 1840-80 JoDavies, Winnebago Freeport 

1827 76 1830-80 Fayette Pekin 

1818 21 1820-80 Johnson Jonesboro 

1826 87 1830-80 Unorg. Terr Danville 

1827 15 1830-80 Edwards Mt. Carmel 

1825 22 1830-80 Peoria, Schuyler Monmouth 

Washington D2 1818 14 1820-80 St. Clair Nashville 



Livingston B3 

Logan C2 

McDonough B2 

McHenry A3 

McLean 

Macon 

Macoupin 

Madison 

Marion 

Marshall 

Mason 

Massac 

Menard 

Mercer 

Monroe 



B3 
C3 
C2 
D2 
D3 
B2 
C2 
E3 
C2 
B2 
D2 



C3 
A3 

B2 
E2 
C3 
CI 
E3 
E3 
B3 
E2 
D3 



Peoria 

Perry 

Piatt 

Pike 

Pope 

Pulaski 

Putnam 

Randolph 

Richland 

Rock Island B2 

St. Clair D2 

Saline E3 

Sangamon C2 

Schuyler C2 

Scott C2 

Shelby C3 

Stark B2 

Stephenson A2 

Tazewell B2 

Union E3 

Vermillion C4 

Wabash D4 

Warren B2 



40 



THIRD EDITION OF THE HANDY BOOK FOR GENEALOGISTS 



Name 



Census 
Map Date Pop. Reports 

Index Formed By M Available Parent County- 



County Seat 



Wayne D3 1819 21 1820-80 Edwards Fairfield 

White D3 1816 21 1820-80 Gallatin Carmi 

Whiteside A2 1839 49 1840-80 JoDaviess, Henry Morrison 

Will B3 1836 134 1840-80 Cook, Iroquois Joliet 

Williamson E3 1839 49 1840-80 Franklin Marion 

Winnebago A3 1836 152 1840-80 JoDaviess Rockford 

Woodford B3 1841 21 1850-80 Tazewell, McLean Eureka 



County Map of Illinois 



B 




Indiana 

Capital, Indianapolis 

When the French explorers first came clerk of each county where the cere- 

into the Indiana region about 1679, the mony was performed, 

entire territory was more or less a wilder- Birth records before October, 1907 

ness inhabited by a few Indians. Gradual- are in the office of the county health 

ly, as more settlers came into the At- officer in the respective county seats; 

lantic coast region, the Indians roaming after October, 1907, in the office of the 

that section were driven west of the state health department, division of vital 

Mississippi River. Numerous tribes re- records, Indianapolis, Ind. 

mained in the Indiana section for many Death records before October, 1899 

years, as the name would indicate. Dur- should be in the office of the county 

ing most of the 1700's. the only white health officer; after October 1899, in the 

men there were some fur traders. office of the division of vital records in 

The first counties to be settled were Indianapolis. 
Knox, Harrison, Switzerland and Clark, Records of wills and all probate mat- 
in the extreme south end. Settlers in ters are in the custody of the Clerk of 
those counties came from Virginia, Ken- the Circuit Court in all county seats, 
tucky and the Carolinas, although a Real estate records, land titles, etc., 
group of Swiss emigrants established are in the office of the county recorder 
themselves in the southeast part of the in the various counties, 
state. The Wabash and the Ohio river The first U. S. Census taken in In- 
sections drew many of the first set- diana was in 1800. 

tiers. Many Germans and Irish came Libraries: Evansville, (Vanderburgh), 
there about 1830. About twenty years Public Library, 22 S. E. Fifth St.; In- 
later New Englanders established them- dianapolis, (Marion), Indiana Historical 
selves in the northern counties. The Society, William Henry Smith Memorial 
central part of the state was the last Library, 140 N. Senate Ave. (North- 
to be settled. Less than seventy years west Territory data); Public Library, 
after the settlement of the state, the Meridian & St. Clair Sts. (Genealogy); 
population had reached more than a Muncie, (Delaware), Public Library, 
million and a half. Abhoring slavery 301 E. Jackson St.; South Bend, (St. 
Quakers left Tennessee and the Caro- Joseph), Northern Indiana Historical 
Unas and established themselves in Society, 112 S. Lafayette Blvd. 
Wayne and Randolph counties along the Lists of a score or more early day his- 
Ohio border mid-way north and south in tories of the state and its people may be 
Indiana. obtained in most libraries in the state. 

With the development of the industri- Most of the census records may be 

al area of the Calumet section, adjacent obtained at the State Library, 

to the South Chicago area in the north- Highly valuable in all research activ- 

west part of the state many Central ities in Indiana is a compilation by the 

Europeans flocked there to man the Indiana State Library at Indianapolis 

rapidly increasing factories. of "A Consolidated Index to Thirty-two 

Admitted to the union, 1816. Popu- Histories of Indianapolis and Indiana, 

lation, nearly four million; white, 97 per 1820-1830". 

cent; population rank among the states, For a detailed account of the early 

twelfth; population density, 108.4 persons settlements of the state, the reader is 

per square mile. referred to the 1932 Year Book of the 

The state is divided into 92 counties Society of Indiana Pioneers in which 

organized during the sixty year period Charles Nebeker Thompson has an article 

from 1790 to 1850. dealing with "The Pioneer Period in 

The marriage records are kept by the Indiana." 

Indiana County Histories 

(Population figures to nearest thousand, 1950 Census) 
Census 
Map Date Pop. Reports 

Name Index Formed By M Available Parent County County Seat 

Adams B3 1838 22 1840-80 Warren Decatur 

Allen A3 1823 184 1830-80 Indian Lands Fort Wayne 

41 



42 



THIRD EDITION OF THE HANDY BOOK FOR GENEALOGISTS 











Census 




Map 


Date 


Pop. 


Reports 


Name 


Index 


Formed 


By M 


Available 


Bartholomew C3 


1821 


36 


1830-80 


Benton 


B2 


1840 


11 


1840-80 


Blackford 


B3 


1834 


14 


1840-80 


Boone 


B2 


1831 


24 


1830-80 


Brown 


C2 


1836 


6 


1840-80 


Carroll 


B2 


1828 


16 


1830-80 


Cass 


B7 


1828 


39 


1830-80 


Clark 


D3 


1801 


48 


1820-80 


Clay 


C2 


1825 


24 


1830-80 


Clinton 


B2 


1830 


30 


1830-80 


Crawford 


D2 


1818 


9 


1820-80 


Daviess 


C2 


1817 


27 


1830-80 


Dearborn 


C3 


1803 


25 


1820-80 


Decatur 


C3 


1821 


18 


1830-80 


DeKalb 


A3 


1836 


26 


1840-80 


Delaware 


B3 


1828 


90 


1820-80 


Dubois 


D2 


1817 


24 


1820-80 


Elkhart 


A3 


1830 


85 


1830-80 


Fayette 


C3 


1819 


23 


1820-80 


Floyd 


D3 


1819 


44 


1820-80 


Fountain 


B2 


1826 


18 


1830-80 


Franklin 


C3 


1811 


16 


1820-80 


Fulton 


A2 


1836 


17 


1840-80 


Gibson 


Dl 


1813 


31 


1820-80 


Grant 


B3 


1831 


62 


1840-80 


Greene 


C2 


1820 


28 


1830-80 


Hamilton 


B2 


1823 


28 


1830-80 


Hancock 


B3 


1828 


20 


1830-80 


Harrison 


D2 


1809 


18 


1820-80 


IJendricks 


C2 


1824 


25 


1830-80 


Henry 


B3 


1822 


46 


1830-80 


Howard 


B2 


1844 


54 


1850-80 


Huntington 


I B3 


1834 


31 


1840-80 


Jackson 


C2 


1815 


28 


1820-80 


Jasper 


A2 


1838 


17 


1840-80 


Jay 


B3 


1837 


23 


1840-80 


Jefferson 


C3 


1810 


22 


1820-80 


Jennings 


C3 


1816 


15 


1820-80 


Johnson 


C2 


1822 


26 


1830-80 


Knox 


C2 


1787 


43 


1820-80 


Kosciusko 


A3 


1835 


33 


1840-80 


Lagrange 


A3 


1832 


15 


1840-80 


Lake 


A2 


1837 


368 


1840-80 


LaPorte 


A2 


1832 


77 


1840-80 


Lawrence 


C2 


1818 


34 


1820-80 


Madison 


B3 


1823 


104 


1830-80 


Marion 


C2 


1821 


552 


1830-80 


Marshall 


A2 


1836 


29 


1840-80 


Martin 


C2 


1820 


11 


1820-80 


Miami 


B2 


1834 


28 


1840-80 


Monroe 


C2 


1818 


50 


1820-80 


Montgomery B2 


1823 


29 


1830-80 


Morgan 


C2 


1822 


24 


1830-80 


Newton 


A2 


1857 


11 


1860-80 


Noble 


A3 


1836 


25 


1840-80 


Ohio 


C3 


1844 


4 


1850-80 


Orange 


D2 


1816 


17 


1820-80 


Owen 


C2 


1818 


12 


1820-80 



Parent County County Seat 

Indian Lands Columbus 

Indian Lands Fowler 

Jay Hartford City 

Indian Lands Lebanon 

Morgan, Johnson, Monroe, 

Lawrence Nashville 

Indian Lands Delphi 

Indian Lands Logansport 

Knox Jeffersonville 

Indian Lands Brazil 

Indian Lands Frankfort 

Harrison English 

Indian Lands Washington 

Original county Lawrenceburg 

Indian Lands Greensburg 

Allen Auburn 

Henry Muncie 

Orange, Perry Jasper 

Indian Lands Goshen 

Wayne Connersville 

Harrison, Clay New Albany 

Montgomery Covington 

Wayne, Ripley Brookville 

Indian Lands Rochester 

Knox Princeton 

Delaware Marion 

Knox Bloomfield 

Hancock, Marion Noblesville 

Madison Greenfield 

Northwest Territory Corydon 

Indian Lands Danville 

Indian Lands New Castle 

Indian Lands (Originally 

Richardville County) Kokomo 

Grant Huntington 

Washington Brownstown 

Indian Lands Rensselaer 

Randolph Portland 

Indian Lands Madison 

Indian Lands Vernon 

Indian Lands Franklin 

Northwest Territory Vincennes 

Indian Lands Warsaw 

Unorganized Territory Lagrange 

Porter, Newton CrownPoint 

Indian Lands LaPorte 

Orange Bedford 

Fayette Anderson 

From Ohio Indianapolis 

Indian Lands Plymouth 

Indian Lands Shoals 

Cass Peru 

Orange Bloomington 

Indian Lands Crawfordsville 

Delaware Martinsville 

Jasper Kentland 

Elkhart Albion 

Dearborn Rising Sun 

Crawford, Washington Paoli 

Indian Lands Spencer 



INDIANA 



43 



Parke C2 1821 16 1830-80 Indian Lands Rockville 

Perry D2 1814 17 1820-80 Harrison, Warrick Cannelton 

Pike D2 1817 15 1820-80 Indian Lands Petersburg 

Porter A2 1832 40 1840-80 Indian Lands Valparaiso 

Posey Dl 1814 20 1820-80 Knox Mount Vernon 

Pulaski A2 1839 12 1840-80 Cass Winamac 

Putnam C2 1821 23 1830-80 Indian Lands Greencastle 

Randolph B3 1818 27 1820-80 Wayne Winchester 

Ripley C3 1817 19 1820-80 Indian Lands Versailles 

Rush C3 1821 20 1830-80 Franklin Rushville 

Saint Joseph A2 1830 205 1830-80 Indian Lands South Bend 

1820 12 1820-80 Clark, Jackson Scottsburg 

1821 28 1830-80 Indian Lands Shelbyville 

1817 16 1820-80 Warrick Rockport 

1850 15 1840-80 Marshall Knox 

1837 17 1840-80 Indian Lands Angola 

1817 24 1820-80 Unorganized Territory Sullivan 

1814 8 1820-80 Indian Lands Vevay 

1826 74 1830-80 Montgomery LaFayette 

1844 16 1850-80 Hamilton Tipton 

1821 6 1830-80 Wayne Liberty 



Scott 
Shelby 
Spencer 
Starke 
Steuben 
Sullivan 
Switzerland C3 
Tippecanoe B2 
Tipton B2 

Union C3 



C3 
C3 
D2 
A2 
A3 
C2 



County Map of Indiana 



B 




44 



THIRD EDITION OF THE HANDY BOOK FOR GENEALOGISTS 











Census 




Map 


Date 


Pop. 


Reports 


Name 


Index 


Formed 


By M 


Available 


Vanderburgh Dl 


1818 


160 


1820-80 


Vermillion 


B2 


1824 


20 


1830-80 


Vigo 


C2 


1818 


105 


1820-80 


Wabash 


B3 


1835 


29 


1840-80 


Warren 


B2 


1825 


9 


1830-80 


Warrick 


D2 


1813 


22 


1820-80 


Washington 


D2 


1813 


17 


1820-80 


Wayne 


B3 


1810 


69 


1820-80 


Wells 


B3 


1837 


20 


1840-80 


White 


B2 


1834 


18 


1840-80 


Whitley 


A3 


1828 


19 


1840-80 



Parent County County Seat 

Indian Lands Evansville 

Parke Newport 

Indian Lands Terre Haute 

Huntington Wabash 

Indian Lands Williamsport 

Indian Lands Boonville 

Indian Lands Salem 

Indian Lands Richmond 

Huntington, Allen Bluffton 

Carroll Monticello 

Huntington Columbia 



Iowa 



Capital, Des Moines 



Outside of a few explorers and priests 
passing by on the Mississippi and some 
fur traders trapping along the rivers, no 
white man came to Iowa until about 
1788. 

Before Iowa became a territory in 
its own name in 1838, it had been part 
of the Missouri Territory, 1812-1821; 
•unorganized territory, 1821>-1834; the 
Michigan Territory, 1834-1836, and the 
Wisconsin Territory, 1836-1838. 

Five years prior to becoming a Ter- 
ritory, Iowa had an influx of white set- 
tlers after a treaty with some of the 
numerous Indian tribes inhabiting the 
country had made it possible for settle- 
ments to be established. The first set- 
tlers came from the Eastern and the 
Southern states. Most of them were or- 
iginally from the British Isles. The 
rapidity of growth is indicated by the 
fact that the Iowa Territory counted 
its inhabitants in 1840 in the forty thous- 
ands. 

Iowa became the twenty-ninth state 
of the union in 1846. 

Among the thousands of immigrants 
who flocked to Iowa immediately prior 
to and after it had gained statehood 
were Scandinavians to the central and 
the western sections of the state, Hol- 
landers to the south-central section, 
Germans along the Mississippi, Scotch 
and Welch to the mining towns of the 
southern counties, and many Czechs to 
the east-central section. 

Iowa's 1950 population was 2,621,072, 
which ranked her twenty-second among 
the states. A smaller population in 
1940 placed her twentieth among the 
states. 



Iowa City, Johnson County, was the 
capital of Iowa until 1857 when it was 
moved about 110 miles west to Des 
Moines, Polk County. 

The Division of Vital Statistics, State 
Department of Health, State Office 
Building, Des Moines 19, Iowa, has birth, 
marriage and death records. More or 
less incomplete birth records availa- 
ble up to 1897, less complete to Janu- 
ary 1918. Death records available in 
some instances from 1880, and com- 
plete from 1905. Marriage records availa- 
ble since 1880. 

The offices of the County Clerk also 
have similar records of births, marriag- 
es and deaths that have occured in their 
respective counties. Some marriage rec- 
ords on file since 1832 in some County 
Clerk offices. They also have records of 
all probate matters and wills. In these 
offices are also divorce proceedings of 
the cases handled in the respective 
counties. 

Federal Works Agency Work Projects 
Administration, Division of Service Pro- 
jects, Washington, D. C. has a guide to 
Public Vital Statistics records in Iowa. 

Naturalization information may be ob- 
tained from the clerk of the United States 
Circuit Court in Des Moines and Du- 
buque, the Superior Courts of Council 
Bluffs and Cedar Rapids, and the dis- 
tric courts in the various county seats. 

Real estate records are in the offices 
of the county recorder, probate matters 
and wills in the office of the county 
clerk, taxpayers lists in the offices of 
the county treasurer. 

The first federal census was taken in 
Iowa in 1840. Special state enumerations 



IOWA 



45 



were taken in 1885, 1895, 1915 and 1925. 
They are on file at the Department of 
History and Archives, Historical Bldg., 
Des Moines, Iowa. 

War service records of Iowa partic- 
ipants in the Civil War, the Spanish- 
American War, World War I, and mem- 
bers of the National Guard from 1900 
to date are in the office of the Adju- 
tant General, State House, Des Moines, 
Iowa. 

Libraries: Cedar Rapids, (Linn), Public 
Library, 428 Third Ave., S. E.; Davenport, 
(Scott), Public Library, 321 Main St.; 
Des Moines, (Polk), 100 Locust St.; Iowa 
City, (Johnson), State Historical Society 
of Iowa Library; Sioux City, (Wood- 
bury), Public Library, 6 & Jackson Sts.; 
Waterloo, (Black Hawk), 5th & Mulber- 
ry St. 

Among books dealing with historical and 
genealogical information concerning Iowa are 
the following: 

Biographical History of Pottawattamie 
County, Iowa. The Lewis Publishing Com- 
pany, 1891. 172 pp. 

Briggs, J. E., Iowa Old and New, Uni- 
versity Publishing Company, 1939. 

Brigham, Johnson, Iowa; Its History and 
Its Foremost Citizens. 



History o} Des Moines. 

Cole, Cyrenus, Iowa; Through the Years. 
Iowa Historical Society. 1940. (Accurate 
historical account.) 

CowLES, Florence Call, Early Algona, 
The Story o/ Our Pioneers, 1854-1874. The 
Register and Tribune Company, Des Moines, 
Iowa, 1929. 221 pp. 

Quick, Herbert. Hawkeye. Grosset, 1939. 
(Iowa Hfe from 1857 to 1858.) 

RiCHMAN, Irving Berdine, loway to 
Iowa. Iowa State Historical Society, 1931. 
Reliable history of early days in Iowa. 

Shambaugh. Benjamin F. The First 
Census o[ the Original Counties of Dubuque 
and Demoine, Iowa, Taken in July 1836. The 
Historical Department of Iowa, Des Moines, 
Iowa. 1897. 93 pp. 

Stong, Phillip Duffield. Hawkeyes; a 
Biography o/ the State of Iowa. Dodd, 
1940. 

TuTTLE, Charles R. and Durrie, Dan- 
iel 5. An Illustrated History of the State 
o/ Iowa [com its Exploration down to 1875. 
Richard S. Peale and Company, 1876. Bio- 
graphical sketches in last fifty-five pages. 

Works Projets Administration, Iowa: 
A Guide to the Hawkeye State. Viking, 1938. 
(American Guide Series) 



Iowa County Histories 

(Population figures to nearest thousand. 1950 Census) 



Name 


Map 
Index 


Date 
Formed 


Pop. 
By M 


Cen.sus 
Reports 

Available 


Adair 


C2 


1853 


12 


1860-80 


Adams 


C2 


1853 


9 


1860-80 


Allamakee 


A4 


1851 


16 


1850-80 


Appanoose 


C3 


1846 


20 


1850-80 


Audubon 


B2 


1855 


12 


1860-80 


Benton 


B3 


1846 


23 


1850-80 


Black Hawk B3 


1843 


100 


1850-80 


Boone 


B2 


1846 


28 


1850-80 


Bremer 


A3 


1851 


19 


1860-80 


Buchanan 


B3 


1848 


22 


1850-80 


Buena Vista Al 


1859 


21 


1860-80 


Butler 


A3 


1853 


17 


1860-80 


Calhoun 


B2 


1855 


17 


1860-80 


Carroll 


B2 


1854 


23 


1860-80 


Cass 


CI 


1853 


19 


1860-80 


Cedar 


B4 


1838 


17 


1840-80 


Cerro Gordo A3 


1855 


46 


1860-80 


Cherokee 


Al 


1857 


19 


1860-80 


Chickasaw 


A3 


1855 


15 


1860-80 


Clarke 


C2 


1850 


9 


1850-80 


Clay 


Al 


1858 


18 


1850-80 


Clayton 


A4 


1837 


23 


1840-80 


Clinton 


B4 


1839 


50 


1840-80 


Crawford 


Bl 


1855 


20 


1860-80 



Parent County County Seat 

Cass Greenfield 

Taylor Corning 

Clayton Waukon 

Davis Centerville 

Cass, Blackhawk Audubon 

Indian Land Purchase Vinton 

Delaware Waterloo 

Polk Boone 

Winnebago, Indian Reserve .... Waverly 

Delaware Independence 

Sac, Clay Storm Lake 

Sioux Rapids 

Buchanan, Black Hawk Allison 

Formerly Fox County Rockwell City 

Guthrie Carroll 

Pottawattamie Atlantic 

Wisconsin Territory Tipton 

Floyd Mason City 

Crawford Cherokee 

Fayette New Hampton 

Lucas Osceola 

Indian Lands Spencer 

Dubuque Elkader 

Dubuque Clinton 

Shelby Denison 



46 



THIRD EDITION OF THE HANDY BOOK FOR GENEALOGISTS 











Census 




Map 


Date 


Pop. 


Reports 


Name 


Index 


Formed 


By M 


Available 


Dallas 


B2 


1847 


24 


1850-80 


Davis 


C3 


1844 


10 


1850-80 


Decatur 


C2 


1850 


13 


1850-80 


Delaware 


B4 


1837 


18 


1840-80 


Des Moines 


C4 


1836 


42 


1840-80 


Dickinson 


Al 


1857 


13 


1860-80 


Dubuque 


B4 


1836 


71 


1840-80 


Emmett 


A2 


1859 


14 


1860-80 


Fayette 


A3 


1850 


28 


1850-80 


Floyd 


A3 


1854 


22 


1860-80 


Franklin 


A3 


1855 


16 


1860-80 


Fremont 


CI 


1850 


12 


1850-80 


Greene 


B2 


1854 


16 


1860-80 


Grundy 


B3 


1856 


14 


1860-80 


Guthrie 


B2 


1851 


15 


1860-80 


Hamilton 


B2 


1856 


20 


1860-80 


Hancock 


A2 


1857 


15 


1860-80 


Hardin 


B3 


1853 


22 


1860-80 


Harrison 


Bl 


1853 


20 


1860-80 


Henry 


C4 


1836 


19 


1840-80 


Howard 


A3 


1855 


13 


1860-80 


Humboldt 


A2 


1857 


13 


1860-SO 


Ida 


Bl 


1858 


11 


1860-80 


Iowa 


B3 


1847 


16 


1850-80 


Jackson 


B4 


1837 


19 


1840-80 


Jasper 


B3 


1845 


32 


1850-80 


Jefferson 


C3 


1839 


16 


1840-80 


Johnson 


B4 


1838 


45 


1840-80 


Jones 


B4 


1837 


19 


1840-80 


Keokuk 


C3 


1844 


17 


1850-80 


Kossuth 


A2 


1855 


26 


1860-80 


Lee 


C4 


1843 


43 


1840-80 


Linn 


B4 


1837 


104 


1840-80 


Louisa 


C4 


1837 


11 


1840-80 


Lucas 


C2 


1849 


12 


1850-80 


Lyon 


Al 


1872 


15 


1870-80 


Madison 


C2 


1850 


13 


1850-80 


Mahaska 


C3 


1844 


25 


1850-80 


Marion 


C3 


1845 


26 


1850-80 


Marshall 


B3 


1849 


36 


1850-80 


Mills 


CI 


1851 


14 


1860-80 


Mitchell 


A3 


1854 


14 


1860-80 


Monona 


Bl 


1854 


16 


1860-80 


Monroe 


C3 


1845 


12 


1850-80 


Montgomery CI 


1851 


16 


1860-80 


Muscatine 


A4 


1837 


32 


1840-80 


O'Brien 


Al 


1860 


19 


1860-80 


Osceola 


Al 


1872 


10 


1870-80 


Page 


CI 


1850 


24 


1850-80 


Palo Alto 


A2 


1858 


16 


1860-80 


Plymouth 


Al 


1858 


23 


1869-80 


Pocahontas 


A2 


1859 


15 


1860-80 


Polk 


B2 


1836 


226 


1850-80 


Pottawattamie 01 1848 


70 


1850-80 


Poweshiek 


B3 


1848 


19 


1850-80 


Ringgold 


C2 


1855 


10 


1860-80 


Sac 


Bl 


1857 


18 


1860-80 


Scott 


B4 


1837 


101 


1840-80 



Parent County County Seat 

Polk Adel 

Van Buren Bloomfield 

Appanoose Leon 

Dubuque Manchester 

Wisconsin Territory Burlington 

Kossuth Spirit Lake 

Wisconsin Territory Dubuque 

Kossuth, Dickinson Estherville 

Clayton West Union 

Chickasaw Charles City 

Chickasaw Hampton 

Pottawattamie Sidney 

Dallas Jefferson 

Black Hawk Grundy Center 

Jackson Guthrie Center 

Webster Webster City 

Wright Garner 

Black Hawk Eldora 

Pottawattamie Logan 

Wisconsin Territory Mount Pleasant 

Chickasaw, Floyd Cresco 

Webster Dakota City 

Cherokee Ida Grove 

Washington Marengo 

From Wisconsin Maquoketa 

Mahaska Newton 

Indian Land Purchase Fairfield 

Des Moines Iowa City 

Wisconsin Territory Anamosa 

Washington Sigourney 

Webster Algcna 

Des Moines Ft. Madison 

Keokuk 

Wisconsin Territory Cedar Rapids 

Des Moines Wapello 

Monroe Chariton 

Woodbury Rock Rapids 

Polk Winterset 

Fox, Sac Indian Purchase Oskaloosa 

Washington Knoxville 

Jasper Marshalltown 

Pottawattamie Glenwood 

Chickasaw Osage 

Harrison Onawa 

Wapello Albia 

Pope Red Oak 

Des Moines Muscatine 

Cherokee Primghar 

Woodbury Sibley 

Pottawattamie Clarinda 

Kossuth Emmetsburg 

Woodbury Le Mars 

Humboldt, Greene Pocahontas 

Indian Lands Des Moines 

Indian Lands Council Bluffs 

Musquaka Montezuma 

Taylor Mount Ayr 

Greene Sac City 

Wisconsin Territory Davenport 



IOWA 



47 











Census 




Map 


Date 


Pop. 


Reports 


Name 


Index 


Formed By M 


Available 


Shelby 


Bl 


1853 


16 


1860-80 


Sioux 


Al 


1860 


26 


1860-80 


Story 


B2 


1853 


44 


1860-80 


Tama 


B3 


1852 


22 


1850-80 


Taylor 


C2 


1851 


12 


1850-80 


Union 


C2 


1855 


16 


1860-80 


Van Buren 


C3 


1836 


11 


1840-80 


Wapello 


C3 


1844 


47 


1850-80 


Warren 


C2 


1846 


18 


1850-80 


Washington 


C4 


1837 


20 


1840-80 


Wayne 


C2 


1850 


12 


1850-80 


Webster 


B2 


1852 


44 


1860-80 


Winnebago 


A2 


1857 


13 


1860-80 


Winneshiek 


A3 


1851 


22 


1850-80 


Woodbury 


Bl 


1857 


104 


1860-80 


Worth 


A3 


1857 


11 


1860-80 


Wright 


A2 


1855 


20 


1860-80 



Parent County County Seat 

Cass Harlan 

Plymouth Orange City 

Jasper, Polk, Boone Nevada 

Boone, Benton Toledo 

Page Bedford 

Clarke Creston 

Des Moines Keosauqua 

Indian Lands Ottumwa 

Polk Indianola 

Wisconsin Territory Washington 

Appanoose Corydon 

*Yell, *Risley Fort Dodge 

*Now known as Hamilton 

Kossuth Forest City 

Indian Lands Decorah 

Indian Lands Sioux City 

Mitchell Northwood 

Webster Clarion 



County Map of Iowa 




Kansas 



Capital, Topeka 

Golc^-seeking Spaniards came from Kansas soil, they merely passed through 
Mexico into the present Kansas area the area, leaving it nothing to remem- 
in the mid-fifteen hundreds. Failing to ber them by. 
appreciate the great value of the rich The real history of Kansas began 



48 THIRD EDITION OF THE HANDY BOOK FOR GENEALOGISTS 

three hundred years later when western The Probate Judge of each county has 

cattle barons recognized the importance records of marriages in his county be- 

of its vast prairie lands as a feeding fore 1913. 

ground for their immense herds of long- Records of divorces granted before 

horn cattle. 1951 are on file in the office of the 

Part of the Louisiana Purchase, be- clerk of the District Court handling the 

came annexed to the United States in matter. Divorces granted after July 

1803. It was included in the Missouri 1951 are filled in the office of the above 

Territory until 1821. For 33 years it mentioned Division of Vital Statistics, 

was known as an unorganized territory, The Naturalization files are kept in 

inhabited mainly by Indians. For many the Topeka office of the United States 

years there was constant trouble be- Circuit Court and the district court in 

tween them and the settlers, until the each one of the counties in the state. 

Indians were pushed gradually into the Probate matter and wills are handled 

Oklahoma area. by the clerks of the district courts in 

Fort Leavenworth became the first ^^^^ county, 

community in the area in 1827. To Real estate property is listed with the 

thousands en route to the valleys of county recorder and county assessor in 

Utah, the gold fields of California or the county where land is located, 

the beckoning Oregon country, it was The Census Bureau, Memorial Bldg., 

a welcome stop-over outfitting place. Topeka, Kansas, has charge of all cens- 

Immediately after the designation of us records. The first Kansas federal cens- 

Kansas as a Territory in 1854 with the us was taken in 1860. 

privilege of the settlers to determine Libraries: Kansas City, (Wyandotte), 

its status as a free or a slave state, Public Library, 6th & Minnesota Sts.; 

there ensued a lively race between the Lawrence, (Douglas), University of 

two opposing factions as to the future Kansas, (Kansas History) ; Topeka, 

of the Territory. In 1859 so many set- (Shawnee), Kansas State Historical So- 

tlers from the free northern states had ciety Library, Memorial Bldg. (History 

moved into the Kansas Territory that and Genealogy); Wichita, (Sedgwick), 

they outvoted their southern opponents. Public Library, 220 S. Main St., (Kansas 

Kansas became a state in 1861, the history), 
thirty-first. The population then was The Kansas State Historical LiiDrary 
about 110,000, consisting mostly of in the Memorial Building, Topeka, Kan- 
Southerners and New Englanders with sas, has more than 10,000 genealogical 
a sprinkling from Missouri, Illinois, In- volumes, including magazines, vital re- 
diana, Ohio, and Kentucky. Many Civil cords, war records, family and local 
War veterans took up homesteads in histories. Copies of the Federal Census 
Kansas following the war. Among the for 1860, 1870 and 1880 are also there, 
foreign born settlers many came from together with the State Census records 
Germany, Russia, Sweden, and England, from 1855 to 1925, inclusive, at ten 
Many Mexicans also settled in the year periods, 
state. Among books dealing with Kansas his- 

The population of the state in the torical and genealogical information are 

1950 census was 1,905,299, ranking thir- the following: 

ty-first in the union. The city popula- Biographical History o[ Central Kansas. 

tion accounts for 52.1 per cent; the The Lewis Publishing Company, New York 

rural, 47.9 per cent. The largest cities and Chicago. 1902. Vol. I. 756 pp. Vol. II, 

in Kansas are Wichita, 168, 279; Kansas 877 pp. 

City, 129,553; Topeka, 78,791; Hutchin- Connelley, William Elsey. History of 

son, 33, 575; Salina, 26,176. Kansas, State and People. American His- 

Nineteen of the 105 Kansas counties torical Society, 1928. History and biogra- 

were formed in 1855. phy. 

Birth records since 1911, marriages Green, C. R. Us and Our Neighbors. A 

since 1913, and death records since 1911 historical and genealogical directory of more 

are obtainable at the office of Division than 3,200 men, women and children who 

of Vital Statistics, State Department lived about Lyndon, Osage county, Kansas, 

of Health, Topeka, Kansas. Most of the as revealed by the assessor's returns for 

records are indexed. the years of 1896, 1897, and 1900. Compiled 

The County Clerk in the county of oc- and published by C. R. Green, Lyndon, 

curance of birth and death has records Kansas, June 1901. 299 pp. 

of these events. Genealogical and Biographical Record of 



KANSAS 



49 



North-eastern Kansas. The Lewis Publish- 
ing Company, Chicago, 1900. 755 pp. 

IsELY, Bliss, and Richards, W. M. Four 
Centuries in Kansas .McCormick-Mathers 
Co., Wichita, Kansas, 1936. 

Works Projects Administration. Kan- 
sas, a Guide to the Sunflower State. Viking, 
1939. American Guide Series. 

Among available autobiographies or bi- 



ographies of important Kansans are the 
following: Earl Browder, Walter P. Chrys- 
ler, John Steuart Curry, Charles Curtis, 
Amelia Earhart, Dwight D. Eisenhower, 
Dorothy Canfield Fisher, Frederick Fun- 
ston, John James Ingalls, Hugh S. John- 
son, Martin (Elmer) Johnson and Osa Helen 
Leighty Johnson, Edgar Lee Masters, Car- 
ry Amelia Moore Nation, Fred Andrew 
Stone, and William Allen White. 



Kansas County Histories 

(Population figures to nearest thousand. 1950 Census) 



Name 



Census 
Map Date Pop. Reports 

Index Formed By M Available 



Allen 


A3 


1855 


18 


1860-80 


Anderson 


A3 


1855 


10 


1860-80 


Atchison 


A2 


1855 


21 


1860-80 


Barber 


D4 


1873 


9 


1880 


Barton 


D2 


1872 


30 


1870-80 


Bourbon 


A3 


1855 


19 


1860-80 


Brown 


Al 


1855 


15 


1860-80 


Butler 


B3 


1855 


31 


1860-80 


Chase 


B3 


1859 


5 


1860-80 


Chautauqua B4 


1875 


7 


1880 


Cherokee 


A4 


1873 


25 


1870-80 


Cheyenne 


Fl 


1875 


6 


1880 


Clark 


E4 


1873 


4 


1880 


Clay 


C2 


1856 


12 


1860-80 


Cloud 


C2 


1860 


16 


1870-80 


Coffey * 


B3 


1875 


10 


1860-80 


Comanche 


D4 


1875 


4 


1880 


Cowley 


B4 


1867 


37 


1870-80 


Crawford 


A3 


1867 


40 


1870-80 


Davis 




1876 






Decatur 


El 


1873 


6 


1880 


Dickinson 


C2 


1855 


21 


1860-80 


Doniphan 


Al 


1855 


10 


1860-80 


Douglas 


A2 


1855 


34 


1860-80 


Edwards 


D3 


1875 


6 


1880 


Elk 


B3 


1875 


7 


1880 


Ellis 


D2 


1865 


19 


1870-80 


Ellsworth 


C2 


1867 


8 


1870-80 


Finney 


F3 


1884 


15 




Ford 


E3 


1873 


20 


1880 


Franklin 


A2 


1856 


20 


1860-80 


Geary 


B2 


1889 


22 




Gove 


E2 


1880 


4 




Graham 


E2 


1881 


5 




Grant 


F3 


1887 


5 




Gray 


E3 


1887 


5 




Greeley 


F2 


1887 


2 




Greenwood 


B3 


1855 


14 


1860-80 


Hamilton 


F3 


1878 


4 




Harper 


C4 


1879 


10 




Harvey 


C3 


1872 


22 


1880 


Haskell 


F3 


1887 


3 




Hodgeman 


E3 


1879 


3 




Jackson 


B2 


1855 


11 


1860-80 


Jefferson 


A2 


1855 


11 


1860-80 



Parent County County Seat 

Original county lola 

Original county Garnett 

Original county Atchison 

Harper Medicine Lodge 

Ellsworth Great Bend 

Original county Fort Scott 

Original county Hiawatha 

Original county El Dorado 

Butler Cottonwood Falls 

Howard Sedan 

Unorganized Territory Columbus 

Kirwin Land District Saint Francis 

Ford Ashland 

Original county Clay Center 

Formerly Shirley County Concordia 

Kiowa Burlington 

Kiowa Coldwater 

Formerly Hunter Winfield 

Bourbon Girard 

Riley — See Geary, Junction City 

Norton Oberlin 

Original county Abilene 

Original county Troy 

Original county Lawrence 

Howard Kinsley 

Howard Howard 

Unorganized Territory Hays 

Saline Ellsworth 

Arapahoe, Foote Garden City 

Unorganized Territory Dodge City 

Original county Ottawa 

Davis Co. 1875 to 1888 .... Junction City 

Unorganized Territory Gove 

Rooks Hill City 

Finney, Kearney Ulysses 

Finney, Ford Cimmarron 

Wichita Tribune 

Original county Eureka 

Unorganized Territory Syracuse 

Kingman Anthony 

McPherson, Sedgwick Newton 

Finney Sublette 

Indian Lands (Est. 1868) Jetmore 

Calhoun Holton 

Original county Oskaloosa 



50 



THIRD EDITION OF THE HANDY BOOK FOR GENEALOGISTS 











Census 




Map 


Date 


Pop. 


Repoi ts 


Name 


Index 


Formed 


By M 


Available 


Jewell 


CI 


1870 


10 


1870-80 


Johnson 


A2 


1855 


63 


1860-80 


Kearny 


F3 


1887 


3 




Kingman 


C3 


1874 


10 


1880 


Kiowa 


D3 


1886 


5 





Parent County County Seat 

Mitchell Mankato 

Original county Olathe 

Finney Lakin 

Unorganized Territory Kingman 

Comanche, Edwards Greensburg 




KANSAS 



51 



Name 



Census 
Map Date Pop. Reports 

Index Formed By M Available 



Labette 


A4 


1867 


29 


1870-80 


Lane 


E2 


1877 


3 




Leavenworth A2 


1855 


42 


1860-80 


Lincoln 


C2 


1870 


7 


1870-80 


Linn 


A3 


1855 


10 


1860-80 


Logan 


F2 


1881 


4 




Lyon 


B2 


1862 


27 


1870-80 


McPherson 


C3 


1870 


24 


1870-80 


Madison 




1860 






Marion 


C3 


1860 


16 


1860-80 


Marshall 


Bl 


1855 


18 


1860-80 


Meade 


E4 


1873 


6 


1880 


Miami 


A2 


1855 


20 


1870-80 


Mitchell 


C2 


1870 


10 


1870-80 


Montgomerj 


rB4 


1869 


46 


1870-80 


Morris 


B2 


1858 


8 


1860-80 


Morton 


F4 


1881 


3 


1870-80 


Nemaha 


Bl 


1855 


14 


1860-80 


Neosho 


A3 


1866 


20 


1870-80 


Ness 


E2 


1873 


6 


1880 


Norton 


Dl 


1872 


9 


1880 


Osage 


B2 


1864 


13 


1860-80 


Osborne 


D2 


1871 


9 


1870-80 


Ottawa 


C2 


1866 


7 


1870-80 


Pawnee 


D3 


1872 


11 


1880 


Phillips 


Dl 


1872 


9 


1880 


Pottawatomie B2 


1857 


12 


1860-80 


Pratt 


D3 


1879 


12 


1880 


Rawlins 


E4 


1873 


6 


1880 


Reno 


C3 


1881 


54 




Republic 


CI 


1868 


11 


1870-80 


Rice 


C3 


1871 


16 


1870-80 


Riley 


B2 


1871 


33 


1860-80 


Rooks 


D2 


1872 


9 


1880 


Rush 


D2 


1874 


7 


1880 


Russell 


D2 


1872 


13 


1870-80 


Saline 


C2 


1855 


33 


1870-80 


Scott 


F2 


1873 


5 


1880 


Sedgwick 


C3 


1872 


222 


1870-80 


Seward 


F4 


1873 


10 


1880 


Shawnee 


B2 


1855 


105 


1860-80 


Sheridan 


E2 


1880 


5 




Sherman 


F2 


1873 


7 


1880 


Smith 


Dl 


1872 


9 


1880 


Stafford 


D3 


1870 


9 


1880 


Stanton 


F3 


1887 


2 




Stevens 


F4 


1887 


5 




Sumner 


C4 


1871 


24 


1870-80 


Thomas 


F2 


1873 


8 


1880 


Trego 


E2 


1879 


6 




Wabaunsee 


B2 


1871 


7 


1860-80 


Wallace 


F2 


1865 


3 


1870-80 


Washington CI 


1856 


13 


1860-80 


Wichita 


F2 


1873 


3 




Wilson 


B3 


1855 


15 


1860-80 


Woodson 


B3 


1855 


7 


1860-80 


Wyandotte 


A2 


1856 


165 


1860-80 



Parent County County Seat 

Neosho Oswego 

Finney Dighton 

Original county Leavenworth 

Ellsworth Lincoln 

Original county Mound City 

Formerly Wallace Russell Springs 

Madison Emporia 

name changed from Breckenridge 

Unorganized Territory McPherson 

Divided to other counties. 

Chase Marion 

Original county Marysville 

Unorganized Territory Meade 

Formerly Lykins Paola 

Kirwin Land District Beloit 

Labette Independence 

Madison Council Grove 

Stanton Richfield 

Original county Seneca 

Labette Erie 

Hodgeman Ness City 

Unorganized Territory Norton 

Formerly Weller Lyndon 

Mitchell Osborne 

Saline Minneapolis 

Rush, Stafford Larned 

Kirwin Land District Phillipsburg 

Indian Lands Westmoreland 

Stafford Pratt 

Kirwin Land District Atwood 

Secigwick Hutchinson 

Washington, Cloud Belleville 

Reno Lyons 

Wabaunsee Manhattan 

Kirwin Land District Stockton 

Unorganized Territory La Crosse 

Ellsworth Russell 

Original county Salina 

Finney Scott City 

Butler Wichita 

Indian Lands Liberal 

Original county Topeka 

Unorganized Territory Hoxie 

Kirwin Land District Goodland 

Unorganized Territory Smith Center 

Unorganized Territory Saint John 

Reorganized Johnson 

Indian Lands Hugoton 

Cowley Wellington 

Kirwin Land District Colby 

Ellis Wakeeney 

Riley, Morris Alma 

Indian Lands Sharon Springs 

Original county Washington 

Indian Lands Leoti 

Original county Fredonia 

Original county Yates Center 

Original county Kansas City 



First formed in 1856. 



UKIVLRSITY OF ILLUMOIS 
LIBRARY 



52 THIRD EDITION OF THE HANDY BOOK FOR GENEALOGISTS 

U. S. Census records of the following discontinued Kansas counties are also avail- 
able as indicated: Arapahoe 1860, includes much of the present state of Colorado; 
Breckenridge, 1860; Davis, 1860, 1870; Dorn, 1860; Godfrey; 1860; Howard, 1870; 
Hunter, 1860; Lykins, 1860; McGhee, 1860; Madison, 1860, and Otoe, 1860. 

Kentucky 

Capital, Frankfort 

The settling of Kentucky from the By 1900 those nine 1790 counties had 

mid-seventeen-hundreds to the early been subdivided into the following pres- 

parts of the eighteen-hundreds included ent counties: 

some of the most hazardous and bloody Mason: The east six-seventh of Pike, 

events of America. Several thousand Floyd, Martin, Johnson; the east half 

of those early settlers lost their lives of each of Magoffin and Morgan; Law- 

in skirmishes with Indians, determined rence, Elliott, Rowan, Carter, Boyd, 

to protect their hunting grounds from Greenup, Lewis, Fleming, Mason, Rob- 

the encroachments of the white man. ertson. Bracken, Campbell, and the east 

Long before any white man had ex- third of Pendleton, 

plored the entire Kentucky area, it was Bourbon: East four-fifths of Harlan, 

claimed by Virginia as part of her Au- Letcher, west one-seventh of Pike, Knott, 

gusta County. It was included in the Perry, east half of Leslie, Breathitt, west 

Virginia County of 1584. half of each of Magoffin and Morgan, 

Daniel Boone, born in Pennsylvania Wolfe, north half of each of Lee and 
of English parents, moved his family in Estill, Powell, Menifee. Bath, Mont- 
September 1773 into the Kentucky area gomery, east half of Clark, Bourbon, 
from Rowan County, North Carolina, Nicholas, east three-fourths of Har- 
on the Yadkin River. However, he had rison, and triangular shaped south one- 
previously explored that section some fifth of Pendleton. 

seven years earlier. Neither was Boone Woodford: Woodford, Scott, east half 

the first to investigate the possibilities of Franklin, Owen, Grant. Boone, Gal- 

of Kentucky. The eastern section of lalin and east half of Carroll, 

the area was explored by Dr. Thomas Fayette: Fayette, Jessamine and west 

Walker as early as 1750. Twenty-five half of Clark. 

years later the Transylvania Company Madison: Madison, east half of Gar- 
was organized under the leadership of rard, south half of Estill, Jackson, north- 
Col. Richard Henderson of North Caro- east third of Rockcastle, Owsley, south 
lina. From Indian tribes he purchased half Lee, Clay, west half of Leslie, and 
almost half of what is now the state west one-fifth of Harlan, 
of Kentucky, all of the land between Jefferson: North half of each of Spenc- 
the Kentucky River, in the central part er and Bullit, Jefferson, Shelby, Oldham, 
of the state, and the Cumberland River, Henry, North-west corner of Ander- 
in the extreme western part. A mul- son, Trimble, and west half of Carroll, 
tiplicity of law suits and the Revolu- Mercer: Triangular south third Frank- 
tionary War completed the activities of lin, east half of Anderson, Mercer, north 
the Henderson enterprise in a dismal two-thirds of Boyle, and northwest third 
failure. of Garrard. 

Previous to these explorations all of Nelson: Washington, Marion, Taylor, 
Kentucky had been made part of Fin- north half of each of Green, Hart, Ed- 
castle County, Virginia. During Boone's monson, Butler, and McLean; Ohio, 
activities in the section, Kentucky was Davies, Hancock, Breckinridge, Meade, 
designated as Kentucky County, Vir- Hardin, south half of each of Bullitt 
ginia. This designation was made in and Spencer; Nelson, Larue, and Gray- 
December, 1776. In 1780 it was divided son. 

into three counties, Fayette, Jefferson, Lincoln: Henderson, Webster, Hop- 

and Lincoln. In 1790 those three coun- kins, south half of McLean; Muhlen- 

ties were subdivided into nine counties, berg; south half of Butler; Warren, south 

Mason, Bourbon, Woodford, Fayette, half of each of Edmonson, Hart and 

Madison, Jefferson, Mercer, Nelson, and Green, Adair, Casey, Lincoln, west of 

Lincoln. Garrard, southwest two-thirds of Rock- 



KENTUCKY 53 

castle; Laurel, south one-third of Boyle, Kentucky population had exceeded the 
Knox, Bell, Whitley, Pulaski, Wayne, million mark, by 1900 the two million, 
Russell, Clinton, Cumberland, Metcalf, and by 1950 it was close to the three mil- 
Monroe, Barren, Allen, Simpson, Logan, lion. 

Todd, Christian, Trigg, Caldwell, Lyon, Division of Vital Records, State Depart- 

Marshall Callowoy, Graves, Fulton, Hick- nient of Health, 620 South Third Street, 

man, Carlisle, Ballard, McCracken, Liv- Louisville 2, Ky., has birth and death 

ingston, Crittenden, and Union. records from the beginning of 1911. The 

The extreme western tip of Kentucky, City Health Department in some of the 

surrounded on three sides by water — the larger cities have still earlier records, 

Mississippi River on the west, the Ohio Records of births and deaths from some 

and the Tennessee Rivers on the north, counties as early as 1851 are in the li- 

and the Kentucky Reservoir on the brary of the Kentucky Historical Society, 

east, is sometimes referred to as the Frankfort, Ky. 

Jackson Purchase Region from the fact County Clerk of county where trans- 

that is was purchased in 1818 from the action was completed has wills, pro- 

Chickasaw Indians during the presi- bate, marriage and divorce records, 

dency of Andrew Jackson. It includes Naturalization records are filed in 

the following eight counties, sometimes the district courts in Bowling Green, 

included in the old Lincoln county: Catlettsburg, Covington, Frankfort, Lon- 

Calloway, Marshall, McCracken, Graves, don, Louisville, Owensboro, and Paducah. 

Fulton, Hickman. Carlisle, and Ballard. They may also be obtained in the office 

The descriptions of the Kentucky of the clerk of the Circuit Court in 
counties carved out of the nine counties the various county seats in the state, 
existing in 1790 given in earlier para- Quite complete records of births, mar- 
graphs follow the Kentucky map printed riages, deaths, wills, etc., on file on 
in "A Century of Population Growth microfilms and written and printed rec- 
— 1790-1900" by the Bureau of Census, ords at the Genealogical Society of 
Washington 25, D. C. In several instanc- Utah, 80 North Main Street, Salt Lake 
es these descriptions do not harmonize City, Utah. Also the complete 1810 
with those on a map arranged by Bayless census. 

Hardin of Kentucky State Historical So- Mimeographed copies of the 1810 

ciety and published in Heineman and Census by counties, and vital statistics 

Brumbaugh's "First Census of Kentucky, by counties, may be obtained from Mrs. 

1790" (Kentucky Taxpayers of the Time.) Anne Walker Burns, P.O. Box 6183 

This map is printed on page 45 of the Apex Station, Washington, D. C. 

1953 Handy Book. Those interested may The federal census records for 1790 

compare the two maps in question. and 1800 are missing, but the so called 

On June 1, 1792, Kentucky became "First Census of Kentucky", supplies a 

the fifteenth state admitted into the list of taxpayers of those years, 

union. Libraries: Bowling Green (Warren), 

It took courageous men and women Western Kentucky State College Library, 
to make their homes in a country as (Southern and Western History); Cov- 
full of danger and excitement as existed ington, (Kenton), Public Library, Scott 
in Kentucky in its early days. They & Robbins Sts. ; Frankfort, (Franklin), 
came mostly, to begin with, from Mary- Kentucky Historical Society Library, Old 
lan^, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, State House; Lexington, (Fayette), Pub- 
Tennessee, and Virginia. Originally they lie Library, 2nd & Market Sts. (old news- 
were of German, English , Irish and papers); University of Kentucky Library, 
Scottish descent. As new territories, new (historical manuscripts) ; Filson Club 
states were carved from the large Library, 118 W. Breckenridge St., (Ky. 
American expanse, many of them were and Ohio Valley collections); Free Pub- 
settled by the descendants of the or- lie Library, 301-333 Library Place, 
iginal Kentuckians. With the increased (Southern lore). 

European migration many people have Among books dealing with Kentucky 

also come to Kentucky from Russia, history and genealogy are the following: 

Italy, Poland and Austria. Ardery, Mrs. Wm. Breckenridge. Ken- 

The growth of Kentucky over the tacky Records — Early Wills and Mar- 

years is indicated by these U. S. Census riages. The Keystone Printery, Lexington, 

figures: 1790 — 73,677; 1800 — 220,955; Ky., Vol I, 206 pp. 1926; Vol. II. 1932. 

1810 — 406,511; 1820 — 563,317; 1830 — Biggs, Nina Mitchell and Mackoy, 

687,917; 1840 — 779,828. By 1850 the Mabel Lee. History o/ Greenup County, 



54 THIRD EDITION OF THE HANDY BOOK FOR GENEALOGISTS 

Ky. The Franklin Press. Louisville, Ky.. Ky. 1920. 176 pp. 

1951. 345 pp. JiLLSON, WiLLARD RousE. The Kenfucktj 

/Biographical Encyclopedia of Kentucky Land Grants, 1782-1924. The Standard Print- 

o/ the Dead and Living Men o[ the Nine- ing Company, Inc., Louisville, Ky., 1925. 

teenth Century. O. J. Armstrong Com- 1.844 pp. 

pany. 1873. Old Kentucky Entries and Deeds. The 

Burns, Annie Walker, P. O. Box 6183. Standard Printing Company. Inc.. Louis- 
Washington, D. C. Kentucky Genealogies ville. Ky.. 1926. 571 pp. State land office 
and Historical Recorder. Eleven mimeo- records, 
graphed volumes. McAdams, Mrs. Harry Kennett. /Cen- 

Abstracts of Pension Records from most tucky Pioneer and Court Records. Abstracts 
of the Kentucky counties. of early wills, deeds and marriages from An- 

Cherry, Thomas C, and Stickles, derson, Bourbon. Boyle. Clark. Estill, Fay- 
Arndt M. Story o[ Kentucky. Heath, 1940. ette, Garrard. Harrison, Jassamine, Lincoln. 

Clark, Thomas Dionysius, and Kirk- Madison. Mercer, Montgomery. Nicholas. 
PATRICK, Lee. Exploring Kentucky. Ameri- and Woodford counties. The Keystone 
can Book Co., 1939. Printery. Lexington. Ky. 1929. 382 pp. In- 

Clift, G. Glenn. History o/ Maysville dexed. 
and Mason County. Transylvania Printing McGhee, Lucy Kate, Box 7213. Wash- 
Company, Inc., Lexington, Ky., 1936. Vol ington, D. C. Historical Records of Old Crab 
I 461 pp. Orchard, Lincoln.. Ky. 117 pp. 

"Second Census" o/ Kentucky, 1800. Pension Abstracts o[ Maryland Soldiers 
Frankfort. Ky.. 1954. 333 pp. A privately o/ the Reveloution, War of 1812, and In- 
compiled list of taxpayers in the forty-two dian Wars Who Settled in Kentucky. Vol. I. 
counties of Kentucky of 1800. 76 pp. Vol. II. 90 pp. 

Collins, Lewis {\797-\870) .History of Scott, Hattie Marshall. Kentucky Court 
Kentucky. and Other Records. Records from Bourbon. 

Collins, Richard H. History of Ken- Nicholas. Estill, Fayette. Gallatin. Green, 
tucky. 1924. Harrison, Scott, and Woodford counties and 

Darnell, Ermina Jett. Forks of Elk- other miscellaneous items. The Kentucky 
horn Church. The Standard Printing Co., Historical Society, Frankfort, Ky.. 1953. 
Inc., Louisville. Ky.. 1946. 322 pp. 251 pp. Excellent index. 

Daughters of Colonial Wars, Kentucky Thompson, Ed Porter. History of the 
Society, Kentucky Pioneers and Their Orphan Brigade. Information on about 5.675 
Descendants. Roberts Printing Company, particpiants in the Civil War. Lewis N. 
Frankfort. Ky.. 1950, 460 pp. Thompson. Louisville, Ky.. 1898. 1.104 pp. 

Green, Thomas Marshall. Historic Excellent index. 
Families of Kentucky. Robert Clarke and Tibbals, Alma Owens. History of Pulaski 
Company. Cincinnati. 1889. 304 pp. County, Kentucky. The Franklin Press, 

Hall, Mitchell, Johnson County, Ken- Louisville, Ky., 1952. 272 pp. Fine index. 
tucky. The Standard Press. Louisville. Ky.. Van Meter, Benjamin F. Genealogies 
1928. Vol I, History and Genealogy. 552 and Sketches of Some Old Families. (Vir- 
pp. Vol. II Genealogy. 708 pp. ginia and Kentucky^ John P. Morton and 

Heinemann, Charles Brink. First Census Company. Louisville. Ky., 1901. 183 pp. 
of Kentucky, 1790. A privately compiled Wells, J. W. History of Cumberland 
list of taxpayers appearing in the tax lists County, Kentucky. The Standard Printing 
of Kentucky counties established at time of Company. Louisville. Ky.. 1947. 480 pp;. 
First Census. Southern Book Company. St. Wood, Edith. Middletowns Days and 
James Hotel. Charles Street at Center, Deeds. (Jefferson County) 1946. 281 pp. 
Baltimore 1. Maryland. 1956. 118pp. Works Projects Administration. Ken- 

Jennings, Kathleen. Louisville's First tucky. (American Guide Series) Check List 
Families. A series of genealogical sketches, of Historical Records Survey Publications. 
The Standard Printing Company, Louisville. 1940. 

Kentucky County Histories 

(Population figures to nearest thousand, 1950 Census! 

Census 
M^p Date Pop. Reports „ 

Name Index Formed By M Available Parent County County i>eat 

Adair C2 1801 18 1810-80 Green Columbia 

Allen D3 1815 14 1820-80 Barren, Warren Scottsville 



KENTUCKY 



55 



Name 

Anderson 

Ballard 

Barren 

Bath 

Bell 

Boone 

Bourbon 

Boyd 

Boyle 

Bracken 

Breathitt 



Map 
Index 



Date 
Formed 



C2 1827 



Census 
Pop. Reports 

By M Availal:)k 

9 1830-80 



F3 
D3 
B2 
B3 
CI 
B2 
Al 
C2 
Bl 
B2 



Breckinridge Dl 



BuUitt 

Butler 

Caldwell 

Calloway 

Campbell 



C2 
D3 
E3 
E3 
Bl 



F3 
CI 
Al 
C2 
E3 
B2 
B2 
C3 



Carlisle 

Carroll 

Carter 

Casey 

Christian 

Clark 

Clay 

Clinton 

Crittenden E2 

Cumberland C3 

Daviess Dl 

Edmonson 

Elliott 

Estill 

Fayette 

Fleming 

Floyd 



D3 
A2 
B2 
B2 
Bl 
A2 



Franklin 

Fulton 

Gallatin 

Garrard 

Grant 

Graves 

Grayson 

Green 

Greenup 

Hancock 

Hardin 

Harlan 

Harrison 

Hart 



C2 
F3 
CI 
B2 
CI 
F3 
Dl 
C2 
Al 
Dl 
Dl 
B3 
Bl 
Dl 



Henderson E2 

Henry CI 

Hickman F3 

Hopkins E2 

Jackson B2 



1842 
1798 
1811 
1867 
1798 
1785 
1860 
1842 
1796 
1839 
1799 
1796 
1810 
1809 
1822 
1749 

1886 
1838 
1838 
1806 
1792 
1792 
1806 
1835 
1842 
1796 
1815 
1825 
1869 
1808 



1794 
1845 
1798 
1796 
1820 
1823 
1810 
1792 
1803 
1829 
1792 
1819 
1793 
1819 



9 
28 
10 
48 
13 
18 
50 
21 

8 
20 
16 
11 
11 
13 
20 
76 

6 
9 
23 
17 
42 
19 
23 
11 
11 
9 

57 

9 

7 

15 



1780 101 

1798 12 

1799 54 



26 

14 
4 
11 
10 
31 
17 
11 
25 
6 
50 
72 
14 
15 



31 
11 



1798 
1798 
1821 8 
1808 39 
1858 13 



1850-80 

1810-80 

1820-80 

1880 

1810-80 

1810-80 

1860-80 

1850-80 

1810-80 

1840-80 

1810-80 

1810-80 

1810-80 

1810-80 

1830-80 

1810-80 



1840-80 
1840-80 
1810-80 
1810-80 
1810-80 
1810-80 
1840-80 
1850-80 
1810-80 
1820-80 
1830-80 
1870-80 
1810-80 
1810-80 
1810-80 
1810-80 

1810-80 
1850-80 
1810-80 
1810-80 
1820-80 
1830-80 
1810-80 
1810-80 
1810-80 
1830-80 
1810-80 
1820-80 
1810-80 
1820-80 

1810-80 
1810-80 
1830-80 
1810-80 
1860-80 



Jeffei;son C2 1780 485 1810-80 



Parent County County Seat 

Franklin, Mercer, 

Washington Lawrenceburg 

Hickman, McCracken Wickliffe 

Green, Warren Glasgow 

Montgomery Owingsville 

Knox, Harlan Pineville 

Campbell Burlington 

Fayette Paris 

Carter, Lawrence, Greenup .. Catlattsburg 

Mercer, Lincoln Danville 

Campbell, Mason Brooksville 

Clay, Estill, Perry Jackson 

Hardin Hardinsburg 

Jefferson, Nelson Sheperdsville 

Logan, Ohio Morgantown 

Livingstone Princeton 

Hickman Murray 

Harrison, Mason, Scott Alexandria 

Newport 

Graves, Ballard Bardwell 

Gallatin Carrollton 

Greenup, Lawrence Grayson 

Lincoln Liberty 

Logan Hopkinsville 

Bourbon, Fayette Winchester 

Madison, Floyd, Knox Manchester 

Wayne, Cumberland Albany 

Livingston Marion 

Green Burkesville 

Ohio Owensboro 

Grayson, Hart, Warren Brownsville 

Carter, Lawrence, Morgan .... Sandy Hook 

Clark, Madison Irvine 

Kentcky Lexington 

Mason Flemingsburg 

Fleming, Mason, 

Montgomery Prestonburg 

Woodford, Mercer, Shelby Frankfort 

Hickman Hickman 

Franklin, Shelby Warsaw 

Madison, Lincoln, Mercer Lancaster 

Pendleton Williamstown 

Hickman Mayfield 

Hardin, Ohio Leitchfield 

Lincoln, Nelson Greensburg 

Mason Greenup 

Daviess, Ohio, Breckinridge .... Hawesville 

Nelson Elizabelhtown 

Floyd, Knox Harlan 

Bourbon, Scott Cynthiana 

Hardin, Barrne, 

possibly Green Mumfordville 

Christian Henderson 

Shelby New Castle 

Caldwell, Livingston Clinton 

Henderson Madisonville 

Rockcastle, Owsley, Madison, 

Clay, Estill, Laurel McKee 

Kentucky Louisville 



56 



THIRD EDITION OF THE HANDY BOOK FOR GENEALOGISTS 











Census 




Map 


Date 


Pop. 


Reports 


Name 


Index 


Formed 


By M 


Available 


Jessamine 


C2 


1798 


12 


1810-80 


Johnson 


A2 


1843 


24 


1850-80 


Kenton 


Bl 


1840 


104 


1840-80 


Knott 


A2 


1884 


20 




Knox 


B3 


1799 


30 


1810-80 


Larue 


C2 


1843 


10 


1850-80 


Laurel 


B3 


1825 


26 


1830-80 


Lawrence 


A2 


1821 


14 


1830-80 


Lee 


B2 


1870 


9 


1870-80 


Leslie 


B2 


1878 


16 


1880 


Letcher 


A3 


1842 


40 


1850-80 


Lewis 


Bl 


1806 


14 


1810-80 


Lincoln 


C2 


1780 


19 


1810-80 


Livingstone 


E2 


1798 


7 


1810-80 


Logan 


D3 


1792 


22 


1810-80 


Lyon 


E3 


1854 


7 


1860-80 


McCracken 


F3 


1824 


49 


1830-08 


McCreary 


B3 


1912 


17 




McLean 


Dl 


1854 


10 


1860-80 


Madison 


B2 


1785 


31 


1810-80 


Magoffin 


A2 


1860 


14 


1860-80 


Marion 


C2 


1834 


17 


1840-80 


Marshall 


E3 


1842 


16 


1850-80 


Martin 


A2 


1870 


12 


1880 


Mason 


Bl 


1788 


18 


1810-80 


Meade 


Dl 


1823 


9 


1830-80 


Menifee 


B2 


1869 


5 


1870-80 


Mercer 


C2 


1785 


15 


1810-80 


Metcalfe 


C3 


1860 


10 


1860-80 


Monroe 


C3 


1820 


14 


1820-80 


Montgomery B2 


1796 


13 


1810-80 


Morgan 


B2 


1822 


14 


1830-80 


Muhlenberg D3 


1798 


33 


1810-80 


Nelson 


C2 


1784 


20 


1810-80 


Nicholas 


Bl 


1799 


8 


1810-80 


Ohio 


Dl 


1819 


21 


1810-80 


Oldham 


CI 


1823 


11 


1830-80 


Owen 


CI 


1819 


10 


1820-80 


Owsley 


B2 


1843 


7 


1850-80 


Pendleton 


Bl 


1798 


10 


1810-80 


Perry 


B2 


1820 


47 


1830-80 


Pike 


A2 


1821 


81 


1830-80 


Powell 


B2 


1852 


7 


1860-80 


Pulaski 


C3 


1798 


38 


1810-80 


Robertson 


Bl 


1867 


3 


1870-80 


Rockcastle 


B2 


1810 


14 


1810-80 


Rowan 


B2 


1856 


13 


1860-80 


Russell 


C3 


1825 


14 


1830-80 


Scott 


C2 


1792 


15 


1810-80 


Shelby 


C2 


1792 


18 


1810-80 



Parent County County Seat 

Fayette Nicholasville 

Floyd, Morgan, Lawrence Paintsville 

Campbell Covington 

Independence 
Perry, Breathitt, Floyd, 

Letcher Hindman 

Lincoln Barbourville 

Hardin Hodgenville 

Whitley, Clay, Knox, 

Rockcastle London 

Floyd, Greenup Louisa 

Owsley, Breathitt, Wolfe, 

Estill Beattyville 

Clay, Harlan, Perry Hyden 

Perry, Harlan Whitesburg 

Mason Vanceburg 

Kentucky Co., Va Stanford 

Christian Smithland 

Lincoln Russellville 

Caldwell Eddyville 

Hickman Paducah 

Wayne, Pulaski, Whitley .... Whitley City 

Muhlenberg, Daviess, Ohio Calhoun 

Lincoln Richmond 

Floyd, Johnson, Morgan Salyersville 

Washington Lebanon 

Callaway Benton 

Lawrence, Floyd, Pike, 

Johnson Inez 

Bourbon Maysville 

Hardin, Breckinridge Brandenburg 

Powell, Wolfe, Bath. 

Morgan, Montgomery Frenchburg 

Lincoln Harrodsburg 

Monroe, Adair, Barren, 

Cumberland, Green Edmonton 

Barren, Cumberland Tompkinsville 

Clark Mount Sterling 

Floyd, Bath West Liberty 

Christian, Logan Greenville 

Jefferson Bardstown 

Bourbon, Mason Carlisle 

Hardin Hartford 

Henry, Shelby, Jefferson LaGrange 

Scott, Franklin, Gallatin Owenton 

Clay, Estill, Breathitt Booneville 

Bracken, Campbell Falmouth 

Clay ,Floyd Hazard 

Floyd Pikeville 

Clark, Estill, Montgomery Stanton 

Green, Lincoln Somerset 

Nicholas, Bracken, Mason, 

Fleming, Harrison Mt. Olivet 

Pulaski, Lincoln, Knox, 

Madison Mount Vernon 

Fleming, Morgan Morehead 

Cumberland, Adair, Wayne - Jamestown 

Woodford Georgetown 

Jefferson Shelbyville 



KENTUCKY 



57 



County Map of Kentucky 




1 • ^ K ^ * 


A 






jXfl^i - \ 


- 






f i/?>l/^ ° /^'-^''^■"^-^^A 


B 

{ 
{ 

C 


^ A,V\ \>L« -J ^"^C^^/^ yV V*^ OvO v*^ 




^ 


'^^^ri^ 5 h \i 






ir^^ fc L r t r^ 1 








D 


^r-> ^V I V, A./ U 








^ J 




i\ 










V M A J-~£- \ 




E 


f z c^'^\<^ty^\ a: 1 






\ = ^ KifVr o\ ^ ju^ 1 






marA 

shallV 

CALLO-^ 
WAY 




m^ 


.<^ 




r '" 


^ 








f 




%mi(. 




VLV'vj^/ ■ 


\ 


F 




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58 



THIRD EDITION OF THE HANDY BOOK FOR GENEALOGISTS 



Census 
Map Date Pop. Reports 

Name Index Formed By M Available Parent County County Seat 

Simpson D3 1819 12 1820-80 Allen, Logan, Warren Franklin 

Spencer C2 1824 6 1830-80 Shelby, Bullitt, Nelson Taylorsville 

Taylor C2 1848 14 1850-80 Green Campbellsville 

Todd D3 1819 13 1820-80 Christian, Logan Elkton 

Trigg E3 1820 10 1820-80 Christian, Caldwell Cadiz 

Trimble CI 1836 5 1840-80 Henry, Oldham, Gallatin Bedford 

Union E2 1811 15 1820-80 Henderson Morganfield 

Warren D3 1796 3 1810-80 Logan Bowling Green 

Washington C2 1792 13 1810-80 Nelson Springfield 

Wayne C3 1800 16 1810-80 Pulaski, Cumberland Monticello 

Webster E2 1860 16 1860-80 Hopkins, Union, Henderson Dixon 

Whitley B3 1818 32 1820-80 Knox Williamsburg 

Wolfe B2 1860 8 1870-80 Owsley, Breathitt, Powell, 

Morgan Campton 

Woodford C2 1788 11 1810-80 Fayette Versailles 

U.S. Census note: The Kentucky census figures for 1790 and 1800 are missing. 



Louisiana 



Capital, Baton Rogue 



Ownership of the Louisiana sector for 
the first 250 or 300 years of its discov- 
ery zig-zagged between France and 
Spain, until it was sold to the United 
States as part of the Louisiana Purchase 
in 1803. Some of the quaint customs 
of the early French settlers have been 
perpetuated over the years and gives 
the state an atmosphere of antiquity. 

Every school boy and girl remember 
with nostolgic feelings Longfellow's 
"Evangeline," the poetic story of the 
transfer of large groups of French set- 
tlers from Nova Scotia to Louisiana. 
Many descendants of these Acadians 
still live in Louisiana where they are 
known as Cajuns. 

Rather than to fight against the Mo- 
ther Country during the Revolutionary 
War, many loyal Britons moved their 
families at that time from the Atlantic 
states to Louisiana where they have 
perpetuated themselves. 

On Oct. 1, 1804 Louisiana was divided 
into two parts by Congressional action. 
The upper portion was given the name 
'District of Louisiana" and the lower 
portion "Territory of Orleans". Im- 
mediately after the formation of the 
Territory of Orleans, large numbers of 
Americans from south of the Ohio mov- 
ed into the new acquisition. In 1805 
Louisiana was divided into 12 counties 
and in 1807 the Orleans Territory was 
partitioned into 19 parishes. 

Louisiana became the eighteenth 



state in the union, when it was admit- 
ted on April 8, 1812. 

Among some of the French customs still 
persisting in Louisiana is the designation 
of the counties as parishes. There is 
nothing different between a Lousiana 
parish and a county in any other state 
than the name. Otherwise everything is 
the same. Most Louisianans will forgive 
you should you inadvertently call Caddo 
Parish Caddo County. 

Louisiana ranks twenty-first among 
the states, with its 2,683,516 inhabi- 
tants, 54.8 per cent of whom live in the 
cities and 45.2 per cent in the country. 
Some of its leading cities are New Or- 
leans with a population of 570,445; 
Shreveport, 127,206; Baton Rogue 
125,629; Lake Charles, 41,272; Monroe, 
38,572; Alexandria, 34,913. 

The 1810 U. S. Census sets the pop- 
ulation of the state at 76,556. Each 
new census has seen a larger population 
figure for Louisiana. The largest num- 
erical growth was between 1900 and 
1910 when the population increased 
about 338,000, followed closely by the 
growth between 1940 and 1950, about 
320,000. 

For information regarding wills, deeds 
and marriages write the clerk of the re- 
spective parishes. 

The State Registrar, Bureau of Vital 
Statistics, State Dept. of Health, Civil 
Courts Bldg., New Orleans 7, La., has 
records of births since 1914, some .since 



LOUISIANA 



59 



1870, and deaths since 1914, some since 
1899. The Bureau of Vital Statistics. 
City Health Dept. of New Orleans, 507 
Carondelet Street, has some birth, death 
and marriage records as far back as 
1790. 

Among available books dealing with 
Louisiana are the following: 

Arthur, Stanley C, Old New Orleans. 
A History of the Vieux Carre, its Ancienl 
and Historical Buildings. 246 pp. New Or- 
leans, 1936. 

Baptismal, Marriage and Death Records 
of Christ Church Episcopal Cathedral, New 
Orleans. 1849-1900. Obtained at Southern 
Book Company, Baltimore, Md. 

Curtis, Nathaniel C. New Orleans, Itc 
Old Houses, Shops and Public Buildings. 
267 pp. Philadelphia 1933. 

Deiler, J. Hanno, The Settlement of the 
German Coast ol Louisiana and the Creoles 
of German Descent. 136 pp. Philadelphia, 
1909. 



Guide to Public Vital Statistics Records 
in Louisiana. 

Guide to Vital Statistics Records of 
Church Archives in Louisiana: Vol. L 
Protestant and Jewish Churches; Vol. II, 
Roman Catholic Churches. 

King, Grace. New Orleans, The Place 
and the People. 402 pp. New York 1922. 

Saxon, Lyle. Old Louisiana. 388 pp. New 
York, 1941. 

Louisiana Libraries — Alexandria, 
(Rapides), Rapides Parish Library, P.O. 
Box 1032; Baton Rouge, (Baton Rouge). 
East Baton Rouge Parish Public Library. 
700 Laurel St.; Louisiana State Univer- 
sity, Hill Memorial Library, (Lower 
Mississippi Valley history) ; New Orleans 
(Orleans Parish), Public Library, 1031 
St. Charles Ave.; Tulane University, How- 
ard-Tilton Memorial Library, Audubon 
Place at Freret St. (Southern lore and 
archives); Shreveport, (Caddo), Shrove 
Memorial Public Library, 400 Edwards 
St. 





Map 


Name 


Index 


Acadia 


D3 


Allen 


D3 


Ascension 


C3 


Assumption 


C4 


Avoyelles 


C2 


Beauregard 


E3 


Bienville 


Dl 


Bossier 


El 


Caddo 


El 


Calcasieu 


E3 


Caldwell 


D2 


Cameron 


D4 


Catahoula 


C2 


Claiborne 


Dl 


Concordia 


C2 


De Soto 


E2 


East Baton 




Rouge 


C3 


East Carroll 


CI 


East 




Feliciana 


C3 


Evangeline 


D3 


Franklin 


CI 


Grant 


D2 


Iberia 


C3 


Iberville 


C3 


Jackson 


Dl 


Jefferson 


B4 


Jefferson 




Davis 


D3 



Louisiana Parish Histories 

(Population figures to nearest thousand, 1950 Census) 

Cen.sus 

Date Pop. Reports 

Formed By M Available Parent Parish Parish Seat 

1826 7 Calcasieu Crowley 

1913 19 Calcasieu Oberlin 

1802 22 1810-80 St. James Donaldsville 

1786 17 1810-80 Original Parish Napoleonville 

1736 38 1810-80 Original Parish Marksville 

Reorg. 1873 

1913 18 Calcasieu DeRidder 

1848 19 1850-80 Natchitoches Arcadia 

1843 40 1850-80 Natchitoches Benton 

1838 177 1840-80 Natchitoches Shreveport 

1810 90 1840-80 St. Landry Lake Charles 

1838 10 1840-80 Catahoula Columbia 

1870 6 1870-80 Calcasieu, Vermillion Cameron 

1808 12 1810-80 Harrisonburg 

1828 25 1830-80 Homer 

1807 14 1810-80 Catahoula, Avoyelles Vidalia 

1843 24 1850-80 Natchitoches Mansfield 

1763 158 1820-80 Original Parish Baton Rouge 

1877 16 1880 Carroll Lake Providence 

1824 19 1830-80 Seceded from Feliviana Clinton 

1911 32 St. Landry Ville Platte 

1843 29 1850-80 Catahoula Winnsbora 

1869 14 1870-80 Rapsides, Winn Colfax 

1868 40 1870-80 St. Martin, St. Mary New Iberia 

1807 27 1810-80 Assumption, Ascension Plaquemine 

1823 15 1850-80 Winn Jonesboro 

1825 104 1830-80 Orleans Gretna 

1913 26 Calcasieu Jennings 



60 THIRD EDITION OF THE HANDY BOOK FOR GENEALOGISTS 



Parent Parish Parish Seat 

Attarapas (New Rapides) 

St. Landry Lafayette 

St. James, St. John, 

St. Charles Thibodaux 

Catahoula Jena 

Bienville, Jackson, Union Ruston 

Baton Rouge, Ascension Livingston 

Tensas Tallulah 

Ouachita Bastrop 

Original Parish Natchitoches 

Original Parish New Orleans 

Catahoula Monroe 











Census 




Map 


Date 


Pop. 


Reports 


Name 


Index 


Formed 


By M 


Available 


Lafayette 


C3 


1823 


58 


1830-80 


Lafourche 


B4 


1807 


42 


1810-80 


LaSalle 


D2 


1910 


13 




Lincoln 


Dl 


1873 


26 


1880 


Livingston 


B3 


1832 


20 


1840-80 


Madison 


CI 


1848 


17 


1840-80 


Morehouse 


CI 


1844 


32 


1850-80 


Natchitoches D2 


1863 


38 


1810-80 


Orleans 


B4 


1718 


570 


1810-80 


Ouachita 


Dl 


1807 


75 


1810-80 




LOUISIANA 



61 



Census 

Map Date Pop. Reports 

Name Index Formed By M Available 

Plaquemines A4 1807 14 1810-80 Orleans Pointe a la Hache 

Point 

Coupee C3 1807 22 1810-80 Feliciana. Avoyelles New Roads 

Rapides D2 1763 91 1810-80 Original Parish Alexandria 

Red River E2 1871 12 Caddo, Bossier, Bienville Coushatta 

Richland CI 1868 27 1870-80 Ouachita Rayville 

Sabine E2 1843 21 1850-80 Natchitoches Many 

St. Bernard A4 11 1810-80 Orleans St. Bernard 

St. Charles B4 1785 13 1810-80 Original Parish Hahnville 

St. Helena B3 1845 9 1820-80 Livingston Greensburg 

St. James C4 1785 15 1810-80 Original Parish Convent 

St. John the 

Baptist B3 1807 15 1810-80 Original Parish Edgard 

St. Landry C3 1807 78 1820-80 Avoylles, Rapides Opelousas 

St. Martin C3 1811 26 1810-80 St. Martinville 

St. Mary C4 1811 36 1820-80 Assumption Franklin 

St. 

Tammany B3 1811 27 1820-80 Orleans Covington 

Tangipahoa B3 1869 53 1870-80 Livingston, St. Tammany Amite 

Tensas C2 1843 13 1850-80 Concordia St. Joseph 

Terrebonne B4 1822 43 1830-80 La Fourche Houma 

Union Dl 1838 19 1840-80 Ouachita Farmerville 

Vermilion D4 1844 37 1850-80 Abbeville 

Vernon D2 1871 19 1880 Natchitoches, Rapides, 

Sabine Leesville 

Washington B3 1819 48 1820-80 Original Parish Franklinton 

Webster El 1871 36 1880 Bossier, Claiborne Minden 

West Baton 

Rouge C3 1807 12 1820-80 Baton Rouge Fort Allen 

West Carroll CI 1877 17 1880 Carroll Oak Grove 

West 

Feliciana C3 1824 10 1830-80 Feliciana Saint Francisville 

Winn D2 1851 16 1860-80 Natchitoches Winnfield 

U. S. Census Note: Available are the following census reports from divided 
or discarded parishes: Attakaps, 1810; Baton Rouge, 1810; Carroll, 1840-1870; Fel- 
iciana, 1820; and Opelousas, 1810. 



Maine 



Capital, Augusta 



English and French explorers visited 
the present Maine region many times 
from 1498 to 1605. It was not until 1623 
that the first permanent settlement was 
established. A community came into ex- 
istance that year on the Saco River, in 
the extreme southwestern section. The 
settlers came into the district as English 
subjects and they brought with them the 
laws of England. They came with a per- 
mission granted them by the English 
rulers to create for themselves property 
in American lands. 

One hundred Englishmen aboard two 
vessels left Plymouth on May 31, 1607. 
At the mouth of the Kennebec, then 



known as the Sagadahoc, they estaslished 
a settlement which was disbanded the 
next year when the remaining settlers 
returned to England. Some historians 
maintain that not all of the settlers re- 
turned to England. Some, they say, ap- 
peared in the present Pemaquid, Lincoln 
County, in 1608. 

The appetite of many a hard-working, 
low paid, stay-at-home Englishman was 
whetted by the description of the New 
Land by one of the returning explorers 
when he wrote, "Here are no hard land- 
lords to rack us with high rents, or ex- 
torted fines to consume us. Here, every 
man may be master and owner of his 



62 THIRD EDITION OF THE HANDY BOOK FOR GENEALOGISTS 

own labor and land, or the greatest part, 1716 until 1760, covered the entire state, 
in a small time." In the latter year it was divided into 

Various small groups brought over three counties, Lincoln, Cumberland and 
from England had settled along the coast York. At that time the population was 
of Maine where they engaged in fish- about 17,000, of which 10,000 lived in 
ing, but the first large contingent to the cities mentioned in the sixth para- 
corne were the English Pilgrims or graph above. Above Oxford county, the 
Puritans who arrived via Holland and entire section was a wilderness into 
Plymouth off Cape Cod in Massachusetts which few, if any settlers, had dared 
on November 11, 1620. Most of these to enter. For more than a hundred 
so called dissenters came originally from years transportation was one of the 
Scrooby, Nottinghamshire. greatest handicaps of the settlements. 

In 1622 two members of the Plymouth Travel was mainly along the river cours- 
Company in England, Sir Ferdinando es. The extremely few roads then existing 
Gorgas and Captain John Mason were were in such terrible conditions that the 
granted all of the land between the Ken- limited number of cart roads were a 
nebec and the Merrimac rivers. It was dread to travelers. In many places they 
about that time that Dover and Ports- were almost impassable. To travel a 
mouth in New Hampshire were estab- distance less than sixty miles in those 
lished. Later the grant was divided, days required two long days. In the 
Mason taking the part that is now New winter time, when the roads were froz- 
Hampshire, and Gorgas the eastern en, they were in better passable condi- 
section, called Maine. tion than in the summer. For many 

Late in sixteen hundred many com- years after settlements were established 
munities existed along the coast of Maine in the Maine region, most of the roads, 
and the many rivers in that section, or trails, could be used only by the horse- 
Among them were Kittery, York, Kenne- back riders. 

bunk, Saco, Arundel (Kennebunkport), In 1775 both York and Biddeford were 
and several others which in that early county seats or shire towns of York 
period had a population of several shire, which at that time had a popula- 
thousand. Dissatisfaction among the early tion of about 15,000 or about half the 
settlers toward the aristocratic regime population of the state. Fryeburg, on 
of Gorges and his sons led to Maine's an- the New Hampshire borderline about 
nexation to Massachusetts. After the 65 miles north of Kittery, was made a 
death of King Charles in 1685, and the deed registration office for the section 
brief ascension of James II, Massachus- north of the Ossipee River in 1799. 
etts suddenly lost all of its former legal Like York county so Cumberland coun- 
standings, and landholders had to re- ty had a string of fair sized communi- 
secure their holdings at high fees. The ties along the coast in those early days, 
new land titles were recorded in Boston, including Scarboro, Cape Elizabeth, Fal- 
but Maine also established a special land mouth (Portland), and Yarmouth. These 
office in York. Cumberland County coast towns had a 

In those early days the population population of a little less than ten thous- 
east of the Kennebec River was slim, and. Among the inland plantations, run- 
indeed, most of the settlers gathering ning almost parallel with the coast from 
on the ocean shore or along the rivers twelve to fifteen miles, were Gorham, 
between the Kennebec and the Piscata- Windham, New Gloucester, Gray (New 
qua. Among the settlements of those Boston), Raymond, Turner (Sylvester 
early seventeen hundreds were Biddeford, Canada), and Harrison (Otisfield). Very 
opposite Saco on the southwest bank of few, if any, settlements existed then in 
the Saco River; Portland, then known as the eastern part of the present Oxford 
Falmouth Neck; Berwick, on the east County, not even a road or a trail, 
side of the Piscataqua, which is the From the east boundary of Cumber- 
border between Maine and New Hamp- land extended to the Canadian line, the 
shire; Sanford and Alford, north of Ber- rest of Maine formed the large county 
wick and west of Biddeford; and a long of Lincoln. Only two towns were estab- 
line of smaller communities extending lished along the ocean in all of that ter- 
north along the western state border, ritory, Topsham in the west part of the 
such as Hollis (Little Falls), Newfield present Sagadahoc County, and Belfast 
(Hubbardstown), Waterborough, (Mas- in the present Waldo County. About a 
sabesic), Limington (Ossipee), Baldwin dozen other small communities existed 
(Flintstown), Bridgton (Bridgetown), along the Kennebec River for a dist- 
Fryeburg (Pequawkett), and Stow. ance of about seventy miles from its 

As a county of Maine, Yorkshire from mouth. Between the northernmost Nor- 



MAINE 63 

ridgewock in the present Somerset Coun- alogical libraries in most of the states, 
ty and the coast, some of the other Unpublished information may be search- 
towns then existing were Waterville, ed in the various city offices in the 
Winslow, Sidney, Hallowell, Gardiner state. The large majority of the early 
(Pittstown), Richmond, and Bowdoin- communities still existing have printed 
ham. Pownalborough (Dresden) was the their town histories. Most of those his- 
early county seat of Lincoln County. tories contain genealogical information 

Before the first federal census in about the early settlers. 

1790, the Maine census was taken twice Division of Vital Statistics, Depart- 

— in 1764 and 1772. The 1764 census show- ment of Health and Welfare, Augusta, 

ed the population of the three counties Maine, has records of birth, marriage, 

to be, York, 11,362; Cumberland, 8291, death, and divorce dating from 1892, 

and Lincoln, 4,371. The 1772 census gave adoption records from 1935, and about 

htese figures, York, 13,398; Cumberland, half a million birth, death, and mar- 

10,139, and Lincoln, 5,563. riage records of earlier dates. The state 

From 1650 to 1819, Maine was under census records of 1850, 1860 and 1870 

the jurisdiction of Massachusetts. After are also available there, 

many attempts Maine finally succeeded The city clerks of nearly five hundred 

in breaking away in 1819. A year later towns and cities are in possession of the 

she was admitted into the union as the original records of vital statistics long 

twenty-third state. before 1892. Authorities have reported 

Although the early settlers were main- that "the completeness of the early 

ly from England, many Scotch-Irish and records varies all the way from absent 

Huguenots came during the first cen- to quite complete. Portland's records, for 

tury. Some German families came to instance, are very complete and date 

Waldoboro, straight west from Rock- from 1712." 

land on the south-eastern Atlantic shore In the sixteen offices of clerks of 
line, from 1740 to 1800. During the nine- court are the records of land titles as 
teenth century many artisans came from well as the divorce records. The six- 
England, Scotland and the Scandinavian teen registrars of probate have the 
countries to work in factories and ship settlements of estates and the adoption 
yards. About 1870 many Swedes settled in records. They also have the 1880 census 
the northeast corner of the state as in- enumerations for their respective count- 
dicated by such Swedish place-names ies, but six of the sixteen, it is re- 
as New Sweden, Stockholm, Jemtland, ported, have strangely mislaid them. The 
and Linneus. The large lumber camps courts are located in the county seats of 
in the northwest section of the state each county, 
later beckoned many Finns. War service records, including graves 

Maine has a population of 913,774. registration, is under the office of the 

She ranks thirty-fifth in the nation. Adjutant General in Augusta. 

Her population is divided 51,7 per cent The important libraries in the state 

city and 48.3 per cent rural. are located in the following cities. 

Existing conditions do not tend to- Augusta ( Kennebec Co.), Maine State Li- 
ward large cities in the state. None of brary. State House; Bangor (Penobscot 
them are in the hundred thousand class. Co.), Public Library, 145 Harlow St., 
The largest is Portland, in the south- (genealogies and town histories of Maine, 
west corner, with a population of 77,- N.H., Vt, and Mass.) ; Portland (Cumber- 
634 in the 1950 census. Other compara- land Co.), Guy Gannett Publishing Com- 
tive cities are Lewiston, about thirty pany. Press Herald-Express Library, 390 
miles north of Portland, 40,974; Bangor, Congress St., (newspaper refrences) r 
in the mid-southern section, about eighty- Portland Public Library, 619 Congress 
five miles northeast of Lewiston, 31,558; St. 

Auburn, the twin city of Lewiston, 23,- The following reference books on Maine^ 

134; Augusta, the state capital, about may help you in your research: 

fifteen miles northeast of Lewiston on Banks, Charles Edward, Topographic- 

the Kennebec River, 20,913. Dictionary o[ 2885 English Emigrants to 

Very early in their history, Maine New England, 1620-1650. Publ. 1937. The 

townsi began to keep records of births, homes of emigrants, parishes and counties 

marriages and deaths. Notwithstanding were ascertained in numerous cases, 

the many repeated governmental changes Documentary History of the State of 

during the first two hundred years the Maine. 24 volumes, 1869-1916. Maine His- 

vital statistics of the territory were dis- torical Society. 

turbed but little. Many of the records House, Charles J., Names o[ Maine 

have been printed and are now in Gene- Soldiers ol the American Revolution. Bur- 



64 THIRD EDITION OF THE HANDY BOOK FOR GENEALOGISTS 

leigh & Flynt, Augusta, Me., 1893. 50 pp. 1780; Leeds, 1780; Lewiston, 1768; Lis- 

LiBBY, Charles Thornton; Noyes, Sybiil bon, 1788; Livermore, 1779; Minot, 1769; 

AND Davis, Walier Goodwin, Genealogical Turner, 1772; Webster, 1774. 

Dictionary of Maine and New Hampshire. CUMBERLAND COUNTY — Bridg- 

Five Volumes. Total pages. 795. Based ton, 1768; Brunswick, 1628; Cape Eliz- 

largely on Col. Banks' two mammoth abeth, 1630; Casco, 1729; Cumberland, 

manuscripts, Maine Genealogies, which rep- ^640; Deering, 1637; Falmouth, 1632; 

,., ,. r , . „ ,u 1. Freeport, 1658; Gorham, 1732; Gray, 

resent a life time of work in all the li- ^r,cn tr n -iz-cr. ivt ^i ^ 

_ ^ , , 1756; Harpswell, 1659; New Gloucester, 

braries over the country The Southworth^ I735. Portland, 1632; Scarborough, 1631; 

Anthoensen Press. Portland, Me.. 1928-38. standish. 1763; Windham, 1735; Yar- 

LiBBY, Charles Thornton, Province j^Qy^j^ IQ^Q, 

If^ S^?''io.^^';°''^' "^^ ^'''"^- ^°^' ^' ^^^^- FRANKLIN COUNTY - Avon, 1790; 

Vol. II. 1931 (index). Chesterville, 1782; Farmington, 1794; 

Little, George Thomas_ Genealog^cal ^^^^ ^^9^ Industry, 1793-4; Jay. 

^AU .^l^m Tf I w ^ 1795; New Sharon, 1794; Philips. 1790; 

About 0.000 individual biographies. Vol. ,,;..,, ivqo 

I. 500 pp. Vol. II. 550 pp. Vol. III. 600 pp. ^^^^^oCK COUNTY Blue Hill 

Vol. IV. 633 pp. Lewis Historical Publish- .^St^^" , ,. ^"XT .^^r S ! I' 

ing Company, New York, 1909. (Commer- IJf^; Brooklme S 1688; Bucksport. 

cial biographies should always be checked ^^^^J Carlme. O. 1626; Demariscotta. 

carefully.) S- l^^^; Deer Isle, O. 1789; Eastbrook, 

Maine 1790 Census. 105 pp. Bureau of S. 1800; Eden, 1763; Ellsworth, S. 1763; 

the Census. Government Printing Office, Gouldsborough, S. 1700; Hancock, S. 

Washington, D. C, 1908. 1764-5; Penobscot, S. 1765; Fremont, S. 

Maine Register and State Reference Book. 1613. 

1852. Masters. Smith & Company. Hal- KENNEBEC COUNTY — Augusta, 

lowell, Me.. 1852. 1761-2; Harrington, 1797; Belgrade, 1774; 

Marshall, J. M., Buxton. Maine. Cen- Bingham, 1784; China, 1774; Clinton, 

tennial Anniversary, 288 pp. with 148 pp. 1775; Fayette, 1779; Hallowell, 1771; 

of genealogy. Dresser. McLellan 6 Com- Litchfield, 1795; Manchester, 1774; Mon- 

pany, Portland, Me.. 1874. mouth, 1777; Pittston bef. 1676; Vassal- 

PoPE, Charles Henry, Pioneers of Maine boro, 1760; Wayne, 1773; Waterville, 

and New Hampshire. 1623-1660, a des- 1760; Windsor, 1790; Winslow, 1771; Win- 

criptive list drawn from the records of the throp, 1771. 

colonies, towns, churches, courts, and other KNOX COUNTY — Camden, 1770; 

contemporary sources. Alphabetically at- Gushing, 1789; Friendship, 1750;' Hope, 

ranged. 1908. 1782; Rockland, 1767; St. George, 1635; 

Sargent, William Mitchell, Maine Thomaston, 1770; Union, 1786; Vinal 

Wills. 1640-1760. 953 pp. Four indexes: Haven, 1765; Warren, 1736. 

Testators. Other Persons, and Miscellaneous* LINCOLN COUNTY -- Boothbay, 1630; 

Brown, Thurston & Company, Portland, Me.. Bremen, 1735; Dresden, 1649; Edgecomb, 

^ e T 7^ r. .x-^-, 1744; Jefferson, bef. Rev. New Castle, 

Wes, John, Ascafaqua P/oneers, 1623- -^630 Pownalsborough. 1760; Waldo- 

775. Sketches of early settlers and the borough, 1733-40; Wiscasset, 1730. 

first generation of their children, who lived OXFORD COUNTY _ Ondover, 1789; 

on both sides of the Piscataqua River_ in- Brownsfield, 1770; Buck- 

eluding Dover, Oyster River, Kittery, Exe- ^. ,, ' _„ ' . ^„„„ ' , ^„oo 

ter. Brewick, and Portsmouth.. ^^^1^'. ^Z^^; Canton, 1790 ; Denmark, 1788- 

Spencer, Wilbur Daniel, P.oneers on ^' ^'""^f^' 37^^' Fjyeburg 1763; Han- 

Maine Rivers, with lists to 1651. 1930. o^^^' ^^^'^' Hartford, aft. Rev. Hebron, 

Sprauge's Journal of Maine History. 14 1"'^^' ^i^^"^' ^'^'^^^ ^^^^1^' ^'^'^'^' Norway, 

vols. Printed 1913-1926. l'^^^' Oxford, Dur. Rev. Oxford, 1780; 

The Maine Historical and Genealogical Rumford, 1782; Waterford, 1775. 

Recorder. 1884-1898. 8 vols. Reprint of vital PENOBSCOT COUNTY— Bangor, 1769; 

records, family sketches, etc. (Valuable) Carmel, 1695; Charlestown, 1795; Corinth, 

United States, Works Progress Ad- 1'^96; Eddington, 1785; Hampden, 1767; 

ministration. Bibliography of Research Orono, 1770; Orrington, 1770. 

Projects Reports. Check list of historical SAGADAHOC COUNTY — Arrowsic, 

records survey publications, 1940. 1679; Bath, 1660; Bowdoin, previous Rev. 

Maine Towns Organized Before 1800 Bowdoinham, 1762; Georgetown, 1716; 

ANDROSCOGGIN COUNTY — Dur- Richmond, 1650; Sagadahoe, 1623; Top- 
ham, 1772; E. Livermore, 1780; Greene, sham, 1658; Woolwich, 1638. 



MAINE 



65 



SOMERSET COUNTY — Anson, 1798; 
Athens, 1782; Cannaan, 1770; Concord, 
aft. Rev.; Cornville, 1794; Embden, 1779; 
Fairfield, 1774; Harmony, 1796; Nor- 
ridgewock, aft. Rev.; Skowhegan, 1792; 
Palmyra, 1779; Pittsfield, 1794; Water- 
ville, 1760. 

WALDO COUNTY — Belfast, 1769; 
Frankfort, 1770; Freedom, 1794; Isle- 
borough, 1769; Jackson, 1708; Monroe, 
1760; Montville, 1778-9; Troy, 1778. 

WASHINGTON COUNTY — Calais, 
bef. 1758; Cutler, 1785; Denny ville, 1786; 



Eastport, 1780-2; Edmonds, 1775; Har- 
rington, 1762; Lunec, 1776; Machias, 1762- 
3; Pembroke, 1774. 

YORK COUNTY — Acton, 1776; Al- 
fred, 1764; Berwick, 1624; Biddleford, 
1617-18; Buxton, 1772; Cornish, 1794; 
Dayton, 1664; Eliot, 1632; Hollis, 1753; 
Kennebunk, 1643; Kennebunkport, 1653; 
Kittery, 1623; Lebanon, 1746; Limerick, 
1775; Lyman, 1778; N. Berwick, 1630; 
Parsonfield, 1772; Saco, 1653; Sanford, 
1745; S. Berwick, 1624; Waterborough, 
1768; Wells, 1640; York, 1663. 



County Map of Maine 




66 



THIRD EDITION OF THE HANDY BOOK FOR GENEALOGISTS 



Maine County Histories 



(Population figures to nearest thousand, 1950 Census) 
Census 
Map Date Pop. Reports 

Name Index Formed By M Available 

Androscoggin Dl 1854 84 1860-80 



Aroostook 


A2 


1839 


96 


1840-80 


Cumberland Dl 


1760 


169 


1850-80 


Franklin 


CI 


1838 


21 


1790-80 


Hancock 


C3 


1789 


32 


1800-80 


Kennebec 


C2 


1799 


84 


1800-80 


Knox 


C2 


1860 


28 


18G0-80 


Lincoln 


D2 


1760 


18 


1790-80 


Oxford* 


CI 


1805 


44 


1810-80 


Penobscot 


B3 


1816 


108 


1820-80 


Piscataquis 


B2 


1838 


19 


1840-80 


Sagadahoc 


D2 


1854 


21 


1860-80 


Somerset 


B2 


1809 


40 


1810-80 


Waldo 


C2 


1827 


22 


1830 80 


Washington 


C3 


1789 


35 


1790-80 


York** 










(shire) 


Dl 


1638 


94 


1790-80 



*Part of 1810 Census missing. 
**Part of 1800 Census missing. 



Parent County County Seat 

Cumberland, Oxford, 

Kennebec Auburn 

Washington Houton 

York Portland 

Cumberland Farmington 

Lincoln Ellsworth 

Lincoln Augusta 

Lincoln, Waldo Rockland 

York Wiscasset 

York, Cumberland So. Paris 

Hancock Bangor 

Penobscot, Somerset Dover, Foxcroft 

Lincoln Bath 

Kennebec Skowhegan 

Hancock Belfast 

Lincoln Machias 

Reorg. 1658 Alfred 

Original county 



Maryland 



Capital, Annapolis 



Depressed by the constant persecu- 
tion in England of the members of the 
Roman Catholic church, with which he 
had become affiliated, Lord Baltimore 
(George Calvert), a member of Parlia- 
ment and Secretary of State of James 
I from 1609 to 1625, sponsored move- 
ments to establish colonies in America 
for the persecuted religionists in his 
homeland. Failing in his first attempt 
to build a colony in Newfoundland about 
1620, he persuaded the King of Eng- 
land to grant him land for a colony 
farther south along the Atlantic coast. 
After the grant was made, but before 
the charter had been signed. Lord Balti- 
more died. King Charles I then trans- 
ferred the grant to Lord Baltimore's 
son, Cecilius Calvert, the second Lord 
Baltimore. 

In appreciation of the grant, Lord 
Baltimore named the colony in honor 
of Queen Henrietta Maria, queen con- 
sort of King Charles I of England. 

The grant included all of the land 
between the fortieth parellel and the 
southern bank of the Potomac River. 
The first contingent of emigrants to 
be shipped to the new colony in 1634 
consisted of about twenty Catholic 
gentlemen and two hundred Protestant 
laborers. They established a settlement 



about nine miles up the St George's 
riVer, which empties into the north side 
of the Potomac river, near its mouth. 

Already occupying Kent Island in the 
Chesapeake Bay, just opposite the pre- 
sent site of Annapolis, were William 
Claiborne, a Virginia planter, and a 
large group of settlers he had brought 
there from Virginia several years ahead 
of the Calvert colonists. Continuous 
warfare ensued between the two fac- 
tions, as Claiborne refused to adhere 
to orders from the British King grant- 
ing the territory to Lord Baltimore. 
It was not until Claiborne's death in 
1677 that hostilities ceased. 

The Maryland colony enjoyed a rap- 
id growth. This was due. in a measure, 
to the pronouncement of its founder 
that religious toleration and protection 
would be extended to all Christians 
of whatever shade of religious belief 
who would come there to establish 
their homes. The Act Concerning Re- 
ligion, passed by the colony in 1649, 
declared that "no person professing to 
believe in Jesus Christ shall henceforth 
be troubled or molested on account of 
religion." 

This attracted a large group of Puri- 
tans who had become disgusted with the 
activities of the Church of England 



MARYLAND 67 

controlling Virginia. They left Virginia may, in some cases, be found at the 

and came into Maryland. They settled Clerk of Court's office in each county. 

, ., , . . A A Land grants are only in custody of the 

and bunt up what is now Anne Arun- ^and Office, Annapolis. Maryland. Wills 

del county. This influx increased the are in the Register of Wills' Office in 

population of Maryland to about thirty each county." 

thousand people. LIBRARIES IN MARYLAND 

In 1660 another migration brought Annapolis (Anne Arundel), Maryland 

many settlers to the so-called Eastern State Library, Court Appeals Bldg., 

Shore, the land east of Chesapeake Bay. (original files, Maryland Gazette, 1745- 

This movement was so great it necessi- 1845, early maps); Baltimore, (Balti- 

tated the organization of Talbot county, more), Maryland Historical Society Lib- 

About five years later, with the migra- rary, 201 W. Monument St.; Enoch Pratt 

tion continuing steadily, Somerset coun- Free Public Library, 400 Catherdral St., 

ty was formed south of Talbot (Maryland newspapers); Hagerstown, 

During the first century of the settle- (Washington), Washington County Free 

ment of Maryland, the settlers clung Public Library, 21 Summit Ave. 

to the land along the many water The following books contain valuable 

courses, the rivers and the bays. No genealogical information: 

one ventured far away from the streams. Archives of Maryland: Muster Rolls and 

which provided about the only mode of Q/'/zer Records of Service of Maryland 

transportation m those days. It was j^.^^ps in the American Revolution, 1775- 

not until about 1740 that the Appa- 17^3 73^ p^^^ ^^^qq 

lachian section o f M a r y 1 a nd was Baldwin, " Jane", (Mrs. Cotton). The 

claimed by settlers. Eng ish, Scotch ^ ^^^^ Calendar of Wills. 8 vols. Each 

and Scotch-Irish emigrants f^^ , ^^ ^^Xume indexed. 1635 -17^3. 2379 pp. 

from St. Marys, Charles, and Prince ^ „ c r\ij 

George's countfes at that time. Joining ^^^^7^^' H^^^'^™ .^'^^'^iQi,^'^ 

with them shortly afterward were large ^^^y^^nd Famihes, vital statistics, 1916 

groups of Germans who had come down Brumbaugh, Gaius Marcus, Maryland 

from Pennsylvania. The population in- Records. Colonial Revolutionary, County 

creased so rapidly that in 1748 Fred- a^^^ Church, from Original Sources. Vital 

erick county was organized in the north- statistics. Valuable to researchers. Vol. 1, 513 

west section of Maryland. PP- Williams 6 Wilkins Company, Balti- 

To Baltimore in 1755 came many more 1915. Vol. II. 688 pp. Lancaster Press, 
Acadians driven from Nova Scotia. Less Lancaster, Pa.. 1928. (Southern Book Com- 
than forty years later another group of pany, St. James Hotel, Charles St. at Cent- 
French people, upwards of a thousand, er. Baltimore 1, Maryland.) 
sought refuge in Baltimore from the Burns, Annie Walker, Maryland Gen- 
race riots in Santo Domingo in 1793. ealogical and Historical Recorder. Mimeo- 
From 1817 to 1847 thousands of Irish graphed. 13 vol. 

immigrants came to Baltimore as canal , Abstract o[ Wills o[ Baltimore 

diggers. Later they established them- Co., 1791-1797, 5 vols. 

selves as farmers and miners in the Hayes, Jr., Robert F.. The Maryland 

Appalachian section. Thousands of peo- Genealogical Bulletin, 1930-44. Quarterly 

pie who fled Germany after the 1848 magazine. 

Revolution in that country were given Johnston, Christopher, Genealogies ol 

shelter in Baltimore. ^/,e Members and Record o[ Services of An- 

The rapid increase in the Maryland ^^^^^^^^ Society of Colonial Wars in the 

popultion is indicated by the fact that State of Maryland. (Pedigrees of members.) 

eleven of her twenty-three counties ^57 Baltimore, 1905. 

were formed before 1700 and eight of ^^^^^^ ^^^ ^^^^^^ ^ ^^^ Founders of 

tno remaining before 1800. ,, » j m.i t 1 r;t n ml 

^ . -^ t , .,»■ 1, Maryland. 194 pp. Joel Munsell, Albaflv, 



Concerning vital records of Maryland, 



1878. 



the Division of Vital Records and Statis- „ , ,, r^ . . r »» 
tics. Department of Health, 2411 N. , P^^^'^^^' A,^'^^ Morris. Register of Mary- 
Charles St., Baltimore 18, Maryland, says, '^"^^ Heraldic tamilies. 1635 to 93^. 
"This office is primarily issuing copies Series I. 1935; Series II. 352 pp., 1938. 
of births, deaths and marriages. Our Baltimore. (Southern Book Company. St. 
birth and death records cover the years James Hotel, Charles St. at Center, Bait; 
1898 to the present time. Our marriage more 1. Maryland.) 

records begin June 1, 1951. Marriage U. S. Bureau of the Census, First Cen- 

records prior to that date may be ob- sus of Unitea States, 1790, Maryland, Gov- 

tained from the clerk of the Circuit ernment Printing Office, Washington, D. C, 

Court in the county of marriage. Deeds 1907. 



68 THIRD EDITION OF THE HANDY BOOK FOR GENEALOGISTS 




MARYLAND 



69 





Map 


Name 


Index 


Allegany 


E4 


Anne Arundel C2 


Baltimore 


CI 


Baltimore 




City* 


C2 


Calvert 


C3 


Caroline 


B3 


Carroll 


Dl 


Cecil 


Bl 


Charles 


D3 


Dorchester 


B3 


Frederick 


Dl 


Garrett 


F4 


Harford 


CI 


Howard 


D2 


Kent 


B2 


Montgomery D2 


Prince 




Georges 


D3 


Queen Annes B2 


Saint Mary' 


s C4 


Somerset 


B4 


Talbot 


B3 


Washington 


El 


Wicomico 


B4 


Worcester 


A4 


*1800 Census 



Maryland County Histories 

(Population figures to nearest thousand, 1950 Census) 

Census 

Date Pop. Reports 

Formed By M Available Parent County County Seat 

1789 90 1800-80 Washington Cumberland 

1650 117 1790-80 Original county Annapolis 

1659 270 1790-80 Original county Towson 

950 1790-80 Baltimore Baltimore 

1650 12 1800-80 Original county Prince Frederick 

1773 18 1790-80 Dorchester, Queen Annes Denton 

1836 45 1840-80 Baltimore, Frederick Westminster 

1674 33 1790-80 Kent Elkton 

1658 23 1790-80 Original county La Plata 

1669 28 1790-80 Original county Cambridge 

1748 62 1790-80 Prince Georges Frederick 

1872 21 1880 Allegany Oakland 

1773 52 1790-80 Baltimore Bel Air 

1851 23 1860-80 Baltimore, Anne Arundel .... Ellicott City 

1642 14 1790-80 Orgiinal county Chestertown 

1776 164 1790-80 Frederick Rockville 

1695 194 1790-80 Charles, Calvert Upper Marlboro 

1706 15 1790-80 Talbot Centerville 

1637 29 1790-80 Original county Leonardtovvn 

1666 21 1800-80 Original county Princess Anne 

1662 19 1790-80 Kent Easton 

1776 79 1790-80 Frederick Hagerstown 

1867 40 1870-80 Sommerset, Worcester Salisbury 

1742 23 1790-80 Somerset Snow Hill 

missing. 



Massachusetts 



Capital, Boston 



It was on December 11, 1620, accord- 
ing to the calendar then in vogue, 
December 21, according to our calendar 
that Massachusetts came into existence 
with the landing of the Pilgrims on 
Plymouth Rock. Through the initiative 
of the Massachusetts Bay Company an- 
other colony was formed at Salem in 
1628, and two years later more than a 
thousand colonists arrived founding the 
towns of Boston, Charleston, Roxbury, 
Dorchester, Watertown, and Newton, 
which later became Cambridge. Within 
ten years, more than 20,000 immigrants, 
almost entirely British, had landed in 
Massachusetts. For the first 200 years 
or more by far the larger number of 
immigrants were from England. 

Disasters and political troubles of 
various kinds in Europe from 1850 on 
brought a large influx from Ireland, 
Germany and France. A few years later 
Italians, Russians, Poles, and Portuguese 



came into the state to work in its rapidly 
growing factories, mills and fisheries. 
About 20 per cent of the population is 
foreign born. 

The people of few states have been 
of greater assistance to the genealog- 
ical researcher than have those of Mas- 
sachusetts. From its earliest days, re- 
cords of all vital statistics were kept 
imd preserved. It is said that it is 
easier to trace genealogy in Massachu- 
setts than in any other state. This because 
more records are available. Every town 
not only kept records from its earliest 
days, but has printed those records for 
the convenience of the researcher. 

Sixth state to join the Union, Massa- 
chusetts was admitted Feb. 6, 1788. The 
1950 population was 4,690,514, a little 
more than 300,000 above the 1940 census 
figures. Yet, Massachusetts in 1950 
stepped from the eighth to the ninth 
rank in population among the states. 



70 THIRD EDITION OF THE HANDY BOOK FOR GENEALOGISTS 

Only two states, Rhode Island and New Massachusetts Historical Society Li- 
Jersey, have more people per square brary, 1154 Boylston St., (New England 
mile than Massachusetts, where an av- histories and genealogies) ; Massachusetts 
erage of 568.1 persons live in a square State Library, Beacon Hill, (history and 
mile. That Massachusetts has numerous newspapers); New England Historic 
cities is indicated by the fact that 84.4 Genealogical Society, 9 Ashburn Place, 
per cent of the population live in cities (170,000 volumes of history and genealo- 
and only 15.6 per cent are country gy, and manuscript family genealogies), 
dwellers. Boston is rapidly approaching Cambridge, (Middlesex), Public Library, 
the million mark in population with 449 Broadway, (genealogical collection); 
801,444. Other cities with more than Harvard University Library, (early 
one hundred thousand population are American newspapers). Dedham, (Noi- 
Worchester, 203,486; Springfield, 162,399; folk), Dedham Historical Society, (con- 
Cambridge, 120,740; Fall River, 111,963, siderable number of historical and fami- 
and New Bedford, 109,189. ly histories and diaries in books and man- 

The birth and death records since uscripts, town histories, family genealo- 
1850 may be obtained from Registrar of gies, and newspapers from earliest days); 
Vital Statistics, 272 State House, Bos- Lowell, (Middlesex), City Library, Mer- 
ton 33, Mass. Some records prior to 1850 rimac St., (Book and manuscript gene- 
are in the offices of the city or town alogies); Lynn, (Essex), Public Library, 
clerks in localities where incidents hap- North Common St., (New England his- 
pened. Similar records for Boston avail- tories and genealogies); New Bedford, 
able since 1639 in the office of the City (Bristol), Free Public Library, Pleasant 
Registrar, Registry Division, Room 1004 Street, (southeastern Massachusetts f ami- 
City Hall Anne.x. Boston 8, Mass. ly genealogies in books and manuscripts) ; 

Partial marriage records from 1841, Pittsfield, (Berkshire), The Berkshire 
and complete from 1848 are in the Athenaeum, 44 Bank Row, (biography, 
office of the Division of Vital Statistics, Massachusetts history. New England 
The Secretary of State, Boston 33, Mass. genealogy); Salem, (Essex), Essex Insti- 
Similar records in the offices of the tute Library, 132-134 Essex Street, (town 
city or town clerk where license was is- vital statistics, family histories, and gene- 
sued. Marriage bans may be found in alogies, printed and in manuscript, and 
respective churches in the city. genealogical and historical magazines); 

Divorce records are with the Clerk of Springfield, (Hampden), City Library 

the Superior Court or the Register of Association, 220 State Street. Westfield. 

Probate in the county where divorce was (Hampden), Athenaeum, Elm Street, 

granted. (vital statistic records of the city, ceme- 

The state census records at five year tery inscriptions, death notices from 

intervals from 1850 to 1870, inclusive, newspapers, family histories, printed and 

are in the office of the Secretary of State, manuscript). 

The records of wills, deeds and land Among the many volumes available 

transactions are in the office of the to ease the task of the researchers of 

Secretary of State. Massachusetts genealogy are the follow- 

The city or county assessors have all ing: 

records of taxpayers. Banks, Charles Edward. The Planters 

The office of the Adjutant General o[ the Commonwealth. A study of the Emi- 

controls all war service records. grants and Emigration in Colonial Times: to 

Every town library in Massachusetts which are added Lists of Passengers to 

has vital statistical records from the Boston and to the Bay Colony; the Ships 

adjoining communities and numerous which brought them; their English Homes 

biographical and historical books and and the Places of their Settlement in Mass. 

manuscripts about early residents. Among 1620-1640. 229 pp. Houghton Mifflin Com- 

the most important libraries in the pany, Boston, 1930. 

state for genealogical purposes are the Boltwood, L. M. Genealogies of Hadley 

following: Boston, (Suffolk), Public Li- Families, embracing early settlers of the 

brary, Copley Square, (biographies, towns of Hatfield. South Hadley, Amherst. 

New England family genealogies, Eng- and Granby. 168 pp. Metcalf & Company, 

lish parish registers and records, Northampton, 1862. 

hcarldry from Great Britain, Ireland, First U. S. Census, \ 7 90 ^Massachusetts, 

Germany, Italy, Holland, France, and 363 pp. Government Printing Office, 1908. 

Belgium, early American and Civil War Hills, Leon Clark. Mayflower Planters 

histories, old maps, old newspapers); and First Comers to Ye Olde Colonie, \77 



MASSACHUSETTS 71 

pp. Hills Publishing Company, Washing- buryport, North Andover, Peabody, Rock- 
ton D. C. 1936. P^^^' Rowley, Salem, Salisbury, Saugus, 

Massachusetts Encyclopedia of Biography Sv\ ampscott, Topsfield, Wenham, and 

and Genealogy, Vol. 1. 562 pp. Vol. 11. West Newbury. 

^jQ FRANKLIN — Ashfield Bernardston, 

Massachusetts Soldiers and Sailors of the Buckland, Charlemont, Colrain, Conway, 

Revolutionary War. 17 vols, of abt. 1,000 Deerfield, Erving, Gill, Greenfield, Haw- 

pp. each. Wright & Potter Printing Com- ley Heath, Leverett, Leyden, Monroe, 

pany. Boston, 1896-1908. Montague, New Salem. Northfield, Or- 

Nason, Rev. Elias. A Gazetteer of the ange, Rowe, Shellburne, Shutesbury, 

State of Massachusetts. Map and illistrations. Sunderland, Warwick. Wendell, and 

576 pp. B. B. Russel, Boston, 1874. Whately. 

Rand, John C. One of a Thousand. HAMPDEN — Agawam, Blandford, 

Biographies of Massachusetts Residents. 707 Brimfield, Chester, Chicopee, East Long- 

pp. First National Publishing Company, meadow. Granville, Hampden, Holland, 

Boston, 1890. Holyoke, Longmeadow, Ludlow, Monson, 

Stark, James H. The Loyalists of Mas- Montgomery, Palmer, Russell. South- 

sachusetts and The Other Side of the wick, Springfield, Tolland, Wales, West- 

American Revolution. With names and bi- field, West Springfield, and Wilbraham. 

ographies. Fully indexed. 510 pp. The Salem HAMPSJURE— Amherst, Belchertown, 

Press Company, Salem, Mass., 1910. Chesterfield, Cummington, East Hamp- 

The cities and towns of no other state ton, Goshen, Granby. Hadley, Hatfield, 
have so many published community his- Huntington, Middlefield, Northampton, 
tories and vital statistics as has Massa- Pelham, Plainfield, South Hardely, South- 
chusetts. If your ancestors were there ampton, Ware, West Hampton, Williams- 
before 1850 it would be well to check burg, and Worthington. 
with the libraries and town clerks to MIDDLESEX — Acton, Arlington. Ash- 
ascertain what information may be had by. Ashland, Ayer, Bedford, Belmont, 
from the printed records. Billerica, Boxborough, Burlington, Cam- 

The present Massachusetts counties bridge, Carlisle, Chelmsford, Concord, 

are divided into the following townships: Dracut, Dunstable, Everett, Framingham, 

BARNSTABLE — Barnstable, Bourne, Groton, Holliston, Hopkinton, Hudson, 

Brewster, Chatham, Dennis, Eastham, Lexington, Lincoln, Littleton, Lowell, 

Falmouth, Harwich, Mashpee. Orleans, Maiden, Marlborough, Medford, Mel- 

Provincetown, Sandwich, Truro, Well- rose. Nation, Newton, North Reading, 

fleet, and Yarmouth. Pepperell, Reading, Sherborn, Shirley, 

BERKSHIRE— Adams, Alford, Becket, Sommerville. Stoneham, Stow, Sudbury, 
Cheshire, Clarksburg, Dalton, Edgemont, Tewksbury, Townsend, Tyngsborough, 
Florida, Great Barrington, Hancock, Wakefield, Waltham, Watertown, Way- 
Hinsdale, Lanesborough, Lee, Lenox, land, Westford, Weston, Wilmington, 
Monterey, Mount Washington, New Ash- Winchester, and Woburn. 
ord, New Marlborough, North Adams, NANTUCKET— Nantucket. 
Otis, Peru, Pittsfield, Richmond, Sandis- NORFOLK— Avon, Bellingham, Brain- 
field, Savoy, Sheffield, Stocksridge, tree, Brookline, Canton, Cohasset, Ded- 
Tyringham, Washington, West Stock- ham, Dover, Foxborough, Franklin, Hol- 
ridge, Williamstown, and Windsor. brook, Medfield, Medway, Millis, Milton, 

BRISTOL — Acushnet, Attleboro, Berk- Needham, Norfolk, Norwood, Plainville, 

ley, Dartmouth, Dighton, Easton, Fair- Quincy, Randolph, Sharon, Stoughton, 

haven. Fall River, Freetown, Mansfield. Walpole, Wellesley, Westwood, Wey- 

New Bedford, North Attleborough, Nor- mouth, and Wrentham. 

ton, Rynham, Rehoboth, Seekonk, Swan- PLYMOUTH — Abington, Bridgewater, 

sea, Taunton, and Westport. Brockton, Carver, Duxbury, East Bridge- 

DUKES — Chilmark, Edgartown, Gay- water, Halifax, Hanover, Hanson, Hing- 

head, Gosnold, Oak Bluffs, Tidbury, and ham, Hull, Kingston, Lakeville, Marion, 

West Tidbury. Marshfield, Mattapoisett. Middleborough, 

ESSEX — Andover, Amesbury, Bever- Norwell, Pembroke, Plymouth, Plympton, 

ly, Boxford, Danvers, Essex, Georgetown. Rochester, Rockland, Scituate, West 

Gloucester, Groveland, Hamilton, Hav- Bridgewater, Wareham, and Whitman, 

erhill, Ipswich, Lawrence, Lynn, Lynn- SUFFOLK — Boston, Chelsea, Revere, 

field, Manchester, Marblehead, Merri- and Winthrop. 

mac, Methuen, Middleton, Nahant, New- WORCESTER— Ashburnham, Athol, 



72 THIRD EDITION OF THE HANDY BOOK FOR GENEALOGISTS 

Auburn, Barre, Berlin, Blackstone, Bolt- buryport, 1764; Rowley, 1639; Salem, 

on, Boylston, Brookfield, Charlton, Clin- 1630; Salisbury, 1640; Saugus, 1631, 

ton, Douglas, Dudley, East Brookfield, name ch. to Lynn; Topsfield, 1648; Wen- 

Fitchburg, Gardner, Grafton, Hardwick, ham, 1643. 

Harvard, Holden, Hopedale, Hubbardston, FRANKLIN COUNTY — Ashfield, 

Lancaster, Leicester, Leominster, Lunen- 1'765; Bernardstown, 1765; Buckland, 

burg, Mendon, Milford, Millburg, Mill- 1"'79; Charlemont, 1765; Colrain, 1781; 

ville. New Braintree, North Borough, Conway, 1767; Deerfield, 1677; Gill, 1793; 

Northbridge, North Brookfield, Oakham, Greenfield, 1753; Hawley, 1792; Heath, 

Oxford, Paxton, Petersham. Phillipston, 1785; Huntstown, 1736; Leverett, 1774; 

Princeton, Royalston, Rutland, Shrews- Leyden, 1784; Montague, 1754; New 

bury, Southborough, South Bridge. Spen- Salem, 1753; Northfield, 1714; Orange, 

cer. Sterling, Sturbridge, Sutton, Tern- 1783; Rowe, 1785; Sherburne, 1786; 

pleton, Upton. Uxbridge, Warren, Web- Shutesbury, 1761; Sunderland, 1718; 

ster, Westborough, West Brookfield, Warwick, 1763; Wendall, 1781; Whateley, 

West Boylston, Westminster, Winchen- 1771. 

don, and Worcester. HAMPDEN COUNTY — Blandford. 

Massachusetts Towns Organized 1741, Orig. Glasgow; Brimfield, 1714; 

Before 1800 Chester, 1783; Orig. Murrayfield; Gran- 

BAKNSTABLE COUNTY — Barn- ville, 1754; Longmeadow, 1783; Ludlow, 

stable,, 1638; Chatham, 1712; Dennis, 1774; Monson, 1760; Montgomery, 1780; 

1798; Eastham, 1651; Falmouth, 1694; Murrayfield. 1765; Palmer, 1752; Rus- 

Harwich, 1694; Nawsett, 1643; Orleans, sell, 1792; South Brimfield, 1762; South- 

1747; Provincetown from Eastham, wick. 1770; Springfield, 1641; Westfield, 

Sandwich, 1630; Suckanasset, 1670; 1669; West Springfield, 1774; Wilbra- 

Truro, 1709; Wellfleet, 1763; Yarr^iouth. ham, 1763. 

1639. HAMPSHIRE COUNTY — Amherst, 

BERKSHIKE COUNTY — Adams, 1759; Belchertown, 1761; Chesterfield, 

1778; Alford, 1773; Becket, 1765; Ches- 1762; Cummington, 1779; Easthampton, 

shire, 1793; Clarksburg, 1798; Dalton. 1785; Goshen, 1781; Granby, 1768; Green- 

1784; Egremont, 1760; Gagesborcugh. wich, 1754; Hadley, 1661; Hatfield, 1670; 

1771; Great Barrington, 1761; Hancock. Middlefield, 1783; Northampton, 1656; 

1776; Lanesborough, 1765; Lee, 1777; Norwich, 1773; Pelham, 1743; Plainfieid, 

Lenox, 1767; Loudon, 1773; Mount 1785; Southampton, 1753; South Hadley, 

Washington, 1779; New Ashford, 1781; 1783; Ware, 1761; Westhampton, 1775; 

New Marlborough, 1759; Partridgefield, Williamsburg. 1771; Worthington, 1768. 

1771; Pittsfield, 1771; Richmont, 1766; MIDDLESEX COUNTY — Acton, 1755; 

Richmond, 1785; Sandisfield, 1762; Sav- Ashby, 1767; Bedford, 1729; Billerica, 

oy, 1797; Sheffield, 1733; Stockbridge, 1655; Boxborough, 1783; Burlington, 

1739; Tyringham, 1762; Washington, 1799; Cambridge, 1630; Carlisle, 1780; 

1777; W. Stockbridge, 1774; William- Charlestown, 1630; Chelmsford, 1655; 

town, 1765; Windsor, 1778. Concord, 1635; Dracut, 1702; Dunstable. 

BRISTOL COUNTY ~ Attleboro, 1694; 1680; E. Sudbury, 1780; Farmingham, 
Berkley, 1735; Dartmouth, 1652; Digh- 1675; Groton, 1655; Holliston, 1724; Hop- 
ton, 1712; Easton, 1725; Freetown, 1683; kinston, 1715; Lexington, 1713; Littleton, 
Mansfield, 1770; New Bedford, 1787; 1715; Maiden, 1649; Marlborough, 1660; 
Norton, 1710; Raynham, 1731; Reho- Medford, 1630; Natick, 1661; Newton, 
bath, 1645; Somerset, 1790; Swansea, 1691; Pepperell, 1733; Reading, 1644; 
1668; Taunton, 1639; Westport, 1787. Sherburn, 1674; Shirley, 1753; Stone- 

DUKES COUNTY — Chilmark, 1695; ham, 1725; Stow, 1683; Studbury, 

Edgartown, 1671; Tisbury, 1671, orig. 1639; Tewksbury, 1734; Townsend, 

Middletowne. 1732; Tynesborough, 1732; Waltham, 

ESSEX COUNTY — Amesbury, 1668, 1738; Waltertown, 1630; Westford, 1729; 

name ch. fr. Salisbury-new-town; And- Weston, 1713; Wilmington, 1730; Woburn, 

over, 1646; Beverly, 1668; Boxford, 1642. 

•1694; Bradford, 1675; Danvers, 1752; NANTUCKET COUNTY, Orig. 1695 

Gloucester, 1642; Hamilton, 1793; Hav- (Island). Nantucket, 1795; Sherburn. 

erhill, 1641; Ipswick, 1634; Lynn, 1637; 1687. 

Lynnfield, 1782; Manchester, 1645; NORFOLK COUNTY — Bellingham. 

Marblehead, 1633; Methuen, 1725; Mid- 1719; Braintree, 1640; Brookline, 1705; 

dletown, 1728; Newbury, 1635; New- Canton, 1797; Cohasset, 1700; Dedham, 



MASSACHUSETTS 



73 



County Map of Massachusetts 







74 



THIRD EDITION OF THE HANDY BOOK FOR GENEALOGISTS 



1636; Dorchester, 1630; Dover, 1784; 
Foxsborough, 1778; Franklin, 1778; 
Medfield, 1650; Medway, 1713; Milton, 
1652; Needham, 1711; Quincy, 1792; 
Randolph, 1793; Roxbury, 1630; Sharon, 
1783; Stoughton, 1726; Stoughtonham, 
1765; Walpole, 1724; W. Roxbury, 1772; 
Weymouth, 1635; Wrentham, 1673. 

PLYMOUTH COUNTY — Abington, 
1712; Bridgewater. 1656; Carver, 1790; 
Duxbury, 1637; Halifax, 1734; Hanover, 
1727; Hingham, 1635; Hull, 1644; King- 
ston, 1726; Marshfield, 1642; Middle- 
borough, 1669; Pembroke, 1712; Ply- 
mouth, 1620; Plympton, 1707; Rexhame. 
1642, name ch. to Marshfield. Rochester, 
1686; Scituate, 1633; Wareham, 1739. 

SUFFOLK COUNTY — Boston, 1630; 
Chelsea, S. 1739. 

WORCESTER COUNTY — Ashburn- 
ham, 1765; Athol, 1762; Barre, 1776; 



Berlin, 1784; Bolton, 1738; Boyleston, 
1786; Brookfield, 1673; Charlton, 1755: 
Douglas, 1746; Dudley, 1732; Fitchburg, 
1764; Gardner, 1785; Gerry, 1786; Graf- 
ton, 1735; Hardwick, 1739; Harvard, 
1732; Holden, 1741; Hubbardtown, 1767; 
Hutchinson, 1774; Lancaster, 1653; Lei- 
cester, 1713; Leominster, 1740; Lun- 
enberg, 1728; Mendon, 1667; Milford. 
1780; New Braintree, 1751; New Sher- 
burn, 1745; Northborough, 1766; North- 
bridge, 1772; Oakham, 1693; Oxford, 
1693; Paxton, 1765; Petersham, 1754; 
Princeton, 1759; Royalston, 1765; Rut- 
land, 1714; Shrewsbury, 1720; South- 
borough, 1727; Spencer, 1753; Sterling, 
1781; Sturbridge, 1738; Sutton, 1714; 
Templeton, 1762; Upton, 1735; Ux- 
bridge, 1727; Westborough, 1717; West- 
ern, 1742; Westminister, 1759; Winch- 
enden, 1754; Worcester, 1684. 



Nai 



Barnstable B3 

Berkshire E2 

iBristol 

Dukes 

Essex 



C3 

B4 
CI 



Franklin E2 
Hampden E3 
Hampshire E2 
2Middlesex C2 
Nantucket A4 
sNorfolk 
Plymouth 
Suffolk* 
Worcester 



C2 
C3 
C2 
D2 



Massachusetts County Histories 

(Population figures to nearest thousand, 1950 Census) 



Census 
Map Date Pop. Reports 

Index Formed By M Available 



Parent County 



County Seat 



1685 47 

1761 133 

1685 382 

1695 6 

1643 522 

1811 53 

1812 368 
1662 88 
1643 1065 
1695 3 
1793 392 
1685 189 
1643 897 
1731 546 



1790-80 
1790-80 
1790-80 
1790-80 
1790-80 

1790-80 
1820-80 
1790-80 
1790-80 
1790-80 
1800-80 
1790-80 
1790-80 
1790-80 



Middlesex Barnstable 

Hampshire Pittsfeild 

Middlesex New Bedford, Fall River 

(Martha's Vineyard) Edgartown 

Original county Lawrence, Newbury- 

port, Salem 

Hampshire Greenfield 

Hampshire Springfield 

Middlesex Northampton 

Original county Cambridge, Lowell 

Formerly in N. Y Nantucket 

Suffolk Dedham 

Suffolk Plymouth 

Original county Boston 

Suffolk Fitchburg, Worcester 



Unlike most other states, in Massachusetts some counties have two county seats. 
For example in: 

^Bristol County, Taunton has all the old records as well as those to date for the 
northern part of the county, while the present records for the southern part of 
the county are at Fall River. 

2Middlesex County the records from about 1890 or 1895 for the northern part of the 
county are at Lowell, while all the county records from 1643 to 1890 or 1895, and 
then up to the present for the southern part of the county are at East Cambridge. 
sNorfolk County originally was part of the northeastern section of Massachusetts 
and some towns at present part of New Hampshire. The old records are now at 
Salem in Essex County which originally included most of Norfolk County. 



*Part of 1800 Census missing. 



Michigan 

Capital, Lansing 

Like the Spaniards, the French had been established in the territory, 
little interest in America only to the In 1837 Michigan became the twenty- 
extent of securing immediate wealth, sixth state in the Union. 
They had little or no interest in colon- By 1840 immigration had increased 
izing the country and getting its wealth to such an extent that about half of 
through the productive power of its the southern peninsula was cultivated 
soil. by eager land-seekers who had come 

For some time after France obtained from New York, the New England 
possession of American territory, a con- section, and from Germany, 
siderable outpost had been maintain- A fifty year boom, from 1840 to 1890, 
ed at Detroit. This regime came to an attracted tens of thousands of work- 
end in 1763. Michigan then became ers into the lumber camps and the min- 
part of Quebec territory, under which ing camps of Michigan, where they ex- 
jurisdiction it remained for twenty tracted the valuable and plentiful cop- 
years, per and iron ores from the rich min- 

It was in 1783 that it was again un- eral deposits of the state, 
der the claim of America. For a short To secure the needed man-power to 
time, the Indians, egged on by the British, work these rich deposits men were in- 
inflicted considerable damage to the duced to come there from Canada, Ire- 
Americans in that section. This ended land, Finland, Norway, Sweden, Wales, 
about 1795 when American troops under Poland, Italy and England. The tin 
the command of General Anthony Wayne mines of Cornwall, England, trans- 
cleaned up the situation by herding planted hundreds of expert miners into 
the Indians farther west. the Michigan mining camps. 

From 1787 until 1800 the Michigan Also during that time large groups 
section was part of the Northwest Ter- of religious refugees from Holland set- 
ritory, and from 1800 to 1805 it was tied around Grand Rapids and the west- 
connected with the Ohio and the In- ern coast of the state. 
dian Territories. But the real influx of emigrants came 

Although the first American settlers around 1900 with the beginning of the 

began coming to Michigan from New auto industry. Hundreds of thousands, 

England about 1796, it was not until attracted by the large wages paid at 

about twenty-two years later that any the auto plants, converted Detroit al- 

appreciable influx of settlers was noted, most over night into one of the most im- 

Many came in 1818 to participate in portant industrial centers in the world, 

the first public land sales. The com- As a result, half of the nearly seven 

mencing of work on the Erie Canal million people inhabiting Michigan live 

in that year drew many New England- in Wayne County, while the population 

ers to the Michigan sections. The com- of the other eighty-two Michigan count- 

pletion of that important canal in 1825 ies ranged from three thousand in Oscoda 

added new stimula to the migrations. County to 288,000 in Kent County, with 

That same year many came to work Grand Rapids as the county seat. Thir- 

on the road construction headed to- teen of Michigan's counties have popula- 

ward Chicago. tions exceeding one hundred thousand. 

With the construction of the territor- Michigan's population is 6,371,766, the 

ial road through the Kalamazoo Valley seventh largest of any state in the Union, 

in 1829, many New Englanders estab- Of these 70.7 per cent live in cities, 29.3 

lished themselves in the Jackson, Cal- per cent in rural areas. Among the 

houn, Kalamazoo, and Allegan counties, largest cities are Detroit, 1,849,568; 

The following year saw the Saginaw Grand Rapids, 176,516; Flint, 163,143; 

Valley, including the counties of Shia- Dearborn, 94,994; Saginaw, 92,918; Lan- 

wassee, Saginaw and Bay, beginning to sing 92,129. 

fill up with permanent residents. The Birth, marriage, and death records be- 

growth had been so constant and rapid fore 1867 are handled by the Clerk of 

during the first years of the new cen- the Circuit Court where incident oc- 

tury that by 1836 fourteen counties had cured. Since then at the State Depart- 

75 



76 



THIRD EDITION OF THE HANDY BOOK FOR GENEALOGISTS 



ment of Health, Lansing, Michigan. The 
Clerk of the Probate Court supervises 
all court records, such as wills, and 
probate matters. The Register of Deeds 
of each county handles all matters per- 
taining to land titles. 

For available census records see the 
section headed, "Michigan County His- 
tories." 

The Detroit Society for Genealogical 
Research, % Burton Historical Collection, 
Detroit Public Library, Detroit 2, Mich., 
publish the Detroit Society for Gene- 
alogical Research Magazine which start- 
ed as a monthly but later changed to a 
bimonthly. Inquiries on Michigan history 
and genealogy may be sent to the ad- 
dress above. 

Following is a partial list of Michigan 
libraries: 



Ann Arbor, (Washtenaw), University 
of Michigan, William L. Clements Li- 
brary, South University Ave., (early 
state histories); Cadillacv (Wexford), 
Public Library; County Library, Shel- 
by St.; Detroit, (Wayne), Public Li- 
brary, 5201 Woodward Ave., (historical 
collections); Wayne County Public Li- 
brary, 3661 Trumbull; Flint, (Genesee), 
Public Library, E. Kearsley & Clifford 
Sts. ; County Library; Grand Rapids, 
(Kent), Public Library, 111. Library St., 
(state history, genealogical collection); 
County Public Library, 1961 Godfrey 
Ave., SW; Lansing, (Ingham), Public 
Library, 210 W. Shiawassee St.; State 
Library, State Office Bldg.; Wyandotte, 
(Wayne), Bacon Memorial Public Li- 
brary, 2613 Biddle Ave., (local history). 



Michigan County Histories 

(Population figures to nearest thousand, 1950 Census) 



Name 



Census 
Map Date Pop. Reports 

Index Formed By M Available 



Alcona 


D4 


1869 


6 


1860-80 


Alger 


B2 


1885 


10 




Allegan 


F2 


1835 


47 


1840-80 


Alpena 


D4 


1857 


22 


1860-80 


Antrim 


D3 


1843 


11 


1860-80 


Arenac 


D4 


1883 


10 




Baraga 


Bl 


1875 


8 


1880 


Barry 


F3 


1839 


26 


1840-80 


Bay 


E3 


1857 


88 


1860-80 


Benzie 


D2 


1869 


8 


1870-80 


Berrien 


F2 


1829 


116 


1830-80 


Branch 


F3 


1829 


30 


1840-80 


Calhoun 


F3 


1829 


121 


1840-80 


Cass 


F2 


1829 


28 


1830-80 


Charlevoix 


C3 


1869 


13 


1870-80 


Cheboygan 


C3 


1840 


14 


I860- SO 


Chippewa 


B3 


1826 


29 


1830-80 


Clare 


D3 


1871 


10 


1870-80 


Clinton 


E3 


1839 


31 


1850-80 


Crawford 


D3 


1818 


4 


1820-80 


Delta 


C2 


1861 


33 


1860-80 


Des Moines 




1834 






Dickinson 


Bl 


1891 


25 




Eaton 


F3 


1829 
-1837 


40 


1840-80 


Emmett 


C3 


1853 


17 


1860-80 


Genesee 


E4 


1836 


271 


1840-80 


Gladwin 


D3 


1855 


9 


1860-80 


Gogebic 


A3 


1881 


27 




Grand 










Travers 


D2 


1851 


29 


1860-80 



Parent County County Seat 

Alpena Harrisville 

Schoolcraft Munising 

Kalamazoo Allegan 

Presque Isle Alpena 

Cheboygan Bellaire 

Bay Standish 

Houghton L'Anse 

Eaton Hastings 

Saginaw, Midland Bay City 

Manistee, Traverse Beulah 

Indian Lands St. Joseph 

St. Joseph Coldwater 

Indian Lands Marshall 

Indian Lands Cassopolis 

Manitou Otsego Charlevoix 

Antrim, Unorganized Terr Cheboygan 

Mackinac Sault Ste. Marie 

Isabella Harrison 

Shiawssee St. Johns 

Original county Grayling 

Schoolcraft Escanaba 

Disorganized 

Marquette Iron Mountain 

Kalamazoo Charlotte 

Mackinac Petoskey 

Oakland Flint 

Unorganized Territory Gladwin 

Ontonagon Bessemer 

Traverse, Antrim Traverse City 



MICHIGAN 



77 



Name 



Map 
Index 



Date Pop. 

Formed By M 

1855 33 

1835 32 
1845 40 
1840 33 
1859 

1838 173 

1837 38 

1857 11 

1885 18 

1831 29 

1832 108 
1829 127 
1871 5 

1836 288 
1861 3 



Gratiot E3 

Hillsdale F3 

Houghton Bl 

Huron E4 
Organized 

Ingham F3 

Ionia E3 

Iosco D4 

Iron Bl 

Isabella E3 

Jackson F3 

Kalamazoo F2 

Kalkaska D3 

Kent E2 

Keweenaw Al 

Lake D2 1871 5 

Lapeer E4 1835 36 

Leelanau D2 1863 9 

Lenawee F3 1822 65 

Livingston F3 lo36 27 

Luce B3 1887 8 

Mackinac C3 1818 9 

Macomb F4 1818 185 

Manistee D2 1855 19 

Marquette Bl 1851 48 

Mason D2 1855 20 

Mecosta E3 1859 19 

Menominee CI 1863 25 

Midland E3 1850 36 

Missaukee D3 1871 7 

Monroe F4 1817 76 

Montcalm E3 1831 31 

Montmorency D3 1881 4 

Muskegon E2 1859 122 

Newaygo E2 1851 22 

Oakland F4 1819 396 

Oceana E2 1855 16 

Ogemaw D3 1875 9 

Ontonagon A3 1848 10 

Osceola D3 1867 14 

Oscoda D3 1869 3 

Otsego D3 1875 6 

Ottawa E2 1837 74 

Presque Isle C4 1871 12 

Roscommon D3 1875 6 

Saginaw E3 1835 154 

St. Clair E4 1822 92 

St. Joseph F2 1828 35 

Sanilac E4 1848 31 

Schoolcraft B2 1848 9 

Shiawassee E3 1822 46 

Tuscola E4 1850 38 

Van Buren F2 1837 39 

Washtenaw F3 1826 135 

Wayne F4 1815 2435 

Wexford D2 1830 19 



Census 
Reports 
Available 

1860-80 
1840-80 
1850-80 
1850-80 

1840-80 
1830-80 
1860-80 

1860-80 
1840-80 
1840-80 
1870-80 
1840-80 
1870-80 
1870-80 
1840-80 
1860-80 
1830-80 
1840-80 

1820-80 
1820-80 
1880-80 
1860-80 
1850-80 
1860-80 
1870-80 
1850-80 
1870-80 

1820-80 
1850-80 

1860-80 

1850-80 

1820-80 

1840-80 

1880 

1850-80 

1860-80 

1870-80 

1880 

1840-80 

1860-80 

1880 

1840-80 

1830-80 

1830-80 

1850-80 

1850-80 

1840-80 

1850-80 

1830-80 

1830-80 

1820-80 

1870-80 



Parent County County Seat 

Saginaw Ithaca 

Lenawee Hillsdale 

Schoolcraft Houghton 

Sanilac, Tuscola Bad Axe 

Unorganized Territory Mason 

Unorganized Territory Ionia 

Originally Kanotin Tawas City 

Marquette Crystal Falls 

Unorganized Territory Mt. Pleasant 

Washtenaw Jackson 

St. Joseph Kalamazoo 

Crawford Kalkaska 

Unorganized Territory .... Grand Rapids 

Houghton Eagle River 

Osceola Baldwin 

St. Clair Lapeer 

Grand Traverse Leland 

Indian Lands Adrian 

Shiawassee Howe-ll 

Chippewa Newberry 

Original county St. Igr.ace 

Original county Mt. Clemens 

Wexford Manistee 

Schoolcraft Marquette 

Newaygo Ludington 

Isabella Big Rapids 

Marquette Menominee 

Saginaw Midland 

From unorganized lands in 1840, 

reorganized in 1871 Lake City 

Original county Monroe 

Isabella Stanton 

Alpena Atlanta 

Newaygo Muskegon 

Unorganized Territory White Cloud 

Original county Pontiac 

Newaygo Hart 

Ionia West Branch 

Houghton Ontonagon 

Missaukee, Mecosta Reed City 

Unorganized lands Mio 

Unorganized lands Gaylord 

Allegan Grand Haven 

Unorganized lands Rogers 

Crawford Roscommon 

Unorganized lands Saginaw 

Original county Port Huron 

Indian lands Centerville 

St. Clair Sandusky 

From Upper Peninsula Manistique 

Indian lands Corunna 

Sanilac Caro 

Indian lands Paw Paw 

Original county Ann Arbor 

Original county Detroit 

Originally "Kautawaufet" 

changed 1868 Cadillac 



78 THIRD EDITION OF THE HANDY BOOK FOR GENEALOGISTS 



County Map of Michigan 




Minnesota 

Capital, St. Paul 

Minnesota, with its more than ten special enumeration, was taken in Min- 

thousand lakes, began to attract sturdy nesota in 1857, followed by the regular 

Scandinavian settlers to its borders 1860 census. In 53 of her 87 counties 

shortly after 1851 when the land west the 1870 census reports are missing, 

of the Mississippi was procured from the These counties are indicated in the "Min- 

Indians. Several years prior to that, nesota County Histories", which follows. 

Yankees from the east and north-east, Birth and death records before 1900 

largely from Maine, had been pulled and all marriage records are in thG 

there by its infant lumber industry, which offices of the clerks of the District Court 

in succeeding decades drew thousands in the respective counties. The birth and 

to its borders. When the Scandinavian death records after 1900 are in the 

influx began, it is estimated that less office of State Department of Health, 

than 5,000 persons lived in the terri- Division of Birth and Death Records, 

tory. 469 State Office Bldg., St. Paul 1, Minn. 

The earliest white people to visit the Records of wills, and all probate of 

section were the Catholic missionaries estates are in the office of the clerk 

and fur traders. Chief among the mis- of the Probate Court in the county 

sionaries was Father Hennepin who has court house, while the records of deeds 

been honored by having a county and and mortgages are handled by the reg- 

one of the main streets in Minneapolis ister of deeds in the county seat, 

named after him. He came there about Books which may help you in your re- 

1680 and floated down the Mississippi .search are; 

in a canoe. Holcombe, Maj. R. I. and Bingham. 

When the northern iron mines began William H.. Compendium of History and Bi- 

to be developed in the 1880's. Finns and ography of Minneapolis and Hennepin Coun- 

Slavs came there by the tens of thous- ty Minnesota. Pub. 1914. Henry Taylor 6 

ands. Poland, Lithuania and the Bal- Co. Minneapolis. 

kans furnished much of the labor for History of Steele and Wasega Counties, 

the rapidly growing packing plants Minnesota. Pub. 1887 Union Publishing Co., 

around the Twin cities at the beginning Chicago, being an album of history and 

of the present century. biography, embracing sketche.s of the vil- 

The progenitors of the present Minne- lages. cities and townships, portraits of 

sota generation came mainly from Swe- prominent citizens, old setders. etc. 

den, Norway, Denmark, Germany, Can- Some of the libraries of Minnesota 

ada, Finland, Poland and Russia. which may give you assistance in you.^ 

Minnesota became an organized terri- search of that area are: 
tory on March 3, 1849, and a state, the Minneapolis, (Hennepin), Public Li- 
thirty-second in the Union, May 11, 1858. brary. 1001 Hennepin Ave. (Scandinavian 
The 1950 census showed a population and local history) ; Northfield, (Rice). St. 
of 2,982,483, a little less than 200.000 Olaf College, Rolvaag Memorial Library, 
more than in the previous census. Both (Norwegian collections); St. Paul, (Ram- 
01 those census ratings placed Minnesota sey), Minnesota Historical Society Li- 
as the eighteenth ranking state in the brary, (Minnesota. West. Northwest, Ca- 
Union. nadian collections, biography, genealogy. 

The largest cities in Minnesota are local history, Scandinavian-Americans); 

Minneapolis, 521.718; St. Paul, 311,349; Public Library 4th & Washington Sts.; 

Duluth, 104,511; Rochester. 29,885; St. St. Peter, (Nicollet). Gustavus Adolphus 

Cloud 28,410. College. Folke Bernadotte Memorial Li- 

The first United States Census, a brary, (Swedish collections). 

Minnesota County Histories 

(Population figures to nearest thousand. 1950 Census) 

(it'lV^UJ 

Map Date Pop. Ri;ports 

Name Index Formed By M Available Parent County County Scat 

Aitkin D3 1873 14 *1860-80 Cass, Itasca Aitkin 

Anoka E3 1869 36 *1857-80 Hennepin Anoka 

79 



80 



THIRD EDITION OF THE HANDY BOOK FOR GENEALOGISTS 



Name 


Map 
Index 


Date 
Formed 


Pop. 

By ^ 


Becker 


C2 


1871 


25 


Beltrami 


B2 


1870 


25 


Benton 


D2 


1849 


16 


Big Stone 


El 


1862 


10 


Blue Earth 


F2 


1853 


38 


Brown 


F2 


1855 


26 


Carlton 


D3 




25 


Carver 


E3 


1855 


18 


Cass 


C2 


1851 


19 


Chippewa 


El 


1869 


17 


Chisago 


D3 


1851 


13 


Clay 


CI 


1862 


30 


Clearwater 


C2 


1903 


10 


Cook 


A3 


1875 


3 


Cottonwood 


F2 




16 


Crow Wing 


D2 


1881 


31 


Dakota 


E3 


1849 


49 


Dodge 


F3 


1855 


13 


Douglas 


D2 


1881 


21 


Faribault 


F2 


1855 


24 


Fillmore 


F4 


1853 


24 


Freeborn 


F3 


1856 


35 


Goodhue 


E3 


1853 


32 


Grant 


Dl 


1873 


10 


Hennepin 


E3 


1851 


677 


Houston 


F4 


1854 


14 


Hubbard 


C2 


1883 


11 


Isanti 


D3 


1857 


12 


Itasca 


C3 


1851 


33 


Jackson 


F2 


1869 


16 


Kanabec 


D3 


1881 


9 


Kandiyohi 


E2 




29 


Kittson 


Bl 


1879 


10 


Koochiching 


B3 


1907 


17 


Lac Qui 








Parle 


El 


1863 


15 


Lake 


A3 


1855 


8 


Lake of the 






Woods 


B2 




5 


Le Sueur 


E3 


1853 


19 


Lincoln 


El 


1873 


10 


Lyon 


El 


1871 


22 


McLeod 


E2 


1883 


22 


Mahnomen 


CI 


1878 


7 


Marshall 


Bl 


1878 


16 


Martin 


F2 


1865 


26 


Meeker 


E2 




19 


Mille Lacs 


D3 


1905 


15 


Morrison 


D2 


1883 


26 


Mower 


F3 


1875 


42 


Murray 


Fl 


1872 


15 


Nicollet 


E2 


1853 


21 


Nobles 


Fl 


1871 


22 


Norman 


CI 


1881 


13 


Olmsted 


F3 


1855 


48 


Otter Tail 


Dl 




51 


Pennington 


Bl 


1910 


13 


Pine 


D3 


1857 


18 


Pipestone 


Fl 


1879 


14 



Census 
Reports 

Available Parent County County Seat 

*1860-80 Indian Lands Detroit Lakes 

1880 Unorganized Territory Bemidji 

*1850-80 Original county Foley 

1880 Pierce Ortonville 

*1857-80 Unorganized Territory Mankato 

*1857-80 Nicollett New Ulm 

*1857-80 Pine Carlton 

*1857-80 Hennepin Chaska 

*1857-80 Original county Walker 

*1880 Pierce Montevideo 

*1857-80 Washington Center City 

*1880 Breckinridge Moorhead 

Beltrami Bagley 

1880 Lake Grand Marais 

*1857-80 Brown Windom 

*1857-80 Cass, Aitkin Brainerd 

*1857-80 Original county Hastings 

*1857-80 Olmstead Mantorville 

*1860-80 Todd Alexandria 

*1857-80 Blue Earth Blue Earth 

*1857-80 Original county Preston 

*1857-80 Albert Lea 

*1857-80 Wabasha Red Wing 

1880 Stearns Elbow Lake 

*1857-80 Original county Minneapolis 

*1857-80 Fillmore Caledonia 

Cass Park Rapids 

*1857-80 Anoka Cambridge 

*1850-80 Original county Grand Rapids 

*1857-80 Unorganized Territory Jackson 

*1860-80 Pine Mora 

*1860-80 Meeker Willmar 

Unorganized Territory Hallock 

Itasca International Falls 

*1880 Formerly Toombs Madison 

*1857-80 Formerly Doty Two Harbors 

Baudette 

*1857-80 Unorganized Territory Le Center 

1880 Lyon Ivanhoe 

1880 Redwood Marshall 

*1857-80 Carver Glencoe 

1857-60 Becker Mahnomen 

Kittson Warren 

*1857-80 Faribault Fairmont 

*1857-80 Wright Litchfield 

Kanabec Milaca 

*1857-80 Benton, Stearns Little Falls 

*1857-80 Fillmore Austin 

*1857-80 Lyon Slayton 

*1857-80 Unorganized Territory Saint Peter 

*1857-80 Jackson Worthington 

Polk Ada 

*1857-80 Unorganized Territory Rochester 

*1860-80 Pembina, Cass Fergus Falls 

Red Lake Thief River Falls 

*1857-80 Unorganized Lands Pine City 

*1857-80 Murray Pipestone 



MINNESOTA 



81 



County Map of Minnesota 




82 



THIRD EDITION OF THE HANDY BOOK FOR GENEALOGISTS 



Census 

Map Date Pop. Reports 

Name Index Formed By M Availabls Parent County County Seat 

Polk CI 1879 36 *1860-80 Indian Lands Crookston 

Pope D2 1862 13 *1880 Pierce Glenwood 

Ramsey E3 1849 355 *1850-80 Original county Saint Paul 

Red Lake Bl 1897 7 Polk Red Lake Falls 

Redwood E2 1862 22 *1880 Brown Redwood Falls 

Renville E2 1855 24 *1857-80 Unorganized Territory Olivia 

Rice E3 1853 36 *1857-80 Original county Faribault 

Rock Fl 1870 11 *1857-80 Nobles as Unorg. county Luverne 

Roseau Bl 1895 15 Kittson Roseau 

Saint Louis C3 1855 206 *1857-80 Doty (now Lake) Duluth 

Scott E3 1869 16 *1857-80 Dakota Shakopee 

Sherburne E3 11 *1857-80 Anoka Elk River 

Sibley E2 1853 16 *1857-80 Unorganized Territory Gaylord 

Stearns D2 1855 71 1857-80 Indian Lands Saint Cloud 

Steele F3 1855 21 1857-80 Unorganized Territory Owatonna 

Stevens Dl 1862 11 1870-80 Pierce Morris 

Swift El 1860 16 1870-80 Chippewa. Unorg. Lands Benson 

Todd D2 1856 25 1857-80 Stearns Long Prairie 

Traverse Dl 1862 8 1870-80 Toombs Wheaton 

Wabasha F4 1849 17 1850-80 Original county Wabasha 

Wadena D2 1858 13 1870-80 Cass, Todd Wadena 

Waseca F3 1857 15 1857-80 Steele Waseca 

Washington E3 1860 35 1850-80 Original county Stillwater 

Watonwan F2 1860 14 1870-80 Brown Saint James 

Wilkin Dl 1872 11 1870-80 Cass Breckenridge 

Winona F4 1854 40 1857-80 Unorganized Territory Winona 

Wright E3 1855 28 1857-80 Hennepin Buffalo 

Yellow 

Medicine El 1872 16 1880 Redwood Granite Falls 

Census returns are also available from the following discontinued Minnesota 

counties: Breckenridge, 1860; Buchanan, 1857, 1860; Mankahta, 1850; Monongalia, 

1860; Pembina, 1850, 1857, 1860, 1870; Pierce, 1857, 1860; Toombs, 1860; Wahnata, 
1850. 

(In the census column in all counties marked (*) the 1870 report is missing.) 



Mississippi 



Capital, Jackson 



French and Spanish adventurers, less 
interested in establishing homes in the 
New World but more eager to find 
easy-to-get wealth to take back home 
with them to their native countries, 
came to the Mississippi regions in the 
fifteen hundreds. They didn't stay long 
and left few if any visible evidences of 
their sojourn here. 

When hostilities between the American 
colonies and the Mother Country reach- 
ed the stage where an armed conflict 
became necassary, large numbers of 
Tories of the New England section, un- 
willing to participate in the forced resis- 
tance, moved their families to the Missis- 
sippi section. They established themselves 



in the so-called Natches district, es- 
tablishing plantations around Vicks- 
burg. Port Gibson and Natchez. It was 
through these wealthy landowners that 
the large slave-operated plantations 
came into existance. 

Prior to that time, small groups of 
German and Swiss farmers had been in- 
duced by the French to take up acre- 
ages in the territory. 

In 1798 when the Territory of Missis- 
sippi was formed from the western sec- 
tion of what was then Georgia, it in- 
cluded what later became the Territory 
of Alabama. Shortly after that Terri- 
tory had been formed, Mississippi be- 
came a state on December 10, 1817. 



MISSISSIPPI 



83 



At the completion of the Louisiana 
Purchase in 1803 thousands of settlers 
rushed into Mississippi for the available 
new land. Many of these land seekers 
were former residents of New England 
communities and some of the Southern 
States along the Atlantic Coast. 

Another tremendous migration into 
Mississippi, sometimes likened to the 
1849 gold rush into California, came in 
a four year period ending in 1837 when 
the last of the Indian lands in Missis- 
sippi had been opened for settlement. 
Most of those acquiring this land came 
from the eastern section of the nation. 

Most of the European settlers of Mis- 
sissippi came from Germany, England, 
Greece, Ireland, Italy and Yugoslavia. 
Many Mexicans and Canadians are also 
among those who have establisned 
homes in the state. 

In 1950 the population of Mississippi 
was 2,178,914, about 6,000 less than 
in the 1940 census. In that ten year 
period it had gone from the twenty- 
third to the twenty-sixth rank in popu- 
lation. About half of the population 
of the state is of the white race. 

With about half of the population 
in Mississippi living in the rural sec- 
tions, the cities of necessity must be 
small in comparison to those in in- 
dustrial areas. Its largest cities are Jack- 
son, 98,271; Meridian, 41,893; Biloxi, 
37,425; Greenville, 29,936; Hattiesburg, 
29,474. 

Mississippi is divided into 82 counties. 
The first U. S. Census was taken \n 
the state in 1800, but that census and 
that of 1810 are missing. The available 
census reports for the respective coun- 
ties are indicated in the "Mississpipi 
County Histories." 

A communication from the assistant 
secretary of the Mississippi State Board 
of Health says, "There are very few 
sources of genealogical information in 
this state. Our Bureau of Vital Statis- 
tics was established only on November 
1, 1912 for keeping records of births 
and deaths. Marriage records were au- 
thorized to be kept by our Bureau in 
1926. Our State Department of Archives 
and History, War Memorial Bldg., Jack- 
son, Mississippi, has some Civil War re- 
cords, but we are not so positive as 
to how much information can be furnish- 
ed by them. Outside of these sources I 
do not know of any other organization 
which has any records of this kind." 

Incomplete birth and death records 



prior to 1912 are available in some 
counties at the office of the county 
clerk, where marriage records before 
1926 also may be available. Wills, pro- 
bate files and records of deeds and mort- 
gages are in the office of the clerk of 
the Court of Chancery. 

In several Mississippi counties the 
date of their formation doesn't necessar- 
ily coincide with the date of the avail- 
able records. Some counties have val- 
uable genealogical information dating 
way back earlier than their organization, 
while in other counties the records on 
file are of a much later date. Mrs. 
Margaret Scruggs Carruth, 3715 Turtle 
Creek Boulevard, Dallas 4, Texas, one 
of the leading Southern researchers has 
given the following list of counties and 
the starting dates of their records, 
which you will note, are entirely differ- 
ent than their organization dates: Al- 
corn, 1842; Attala, 1870; Calhoun, Dec. 
22, 1922; Chickasaw, 1863; Forest 
(formed 1906), 1876; Green, 1875; Jack- 
son, 1875; Jasper, 1932; Kemper, 1912; 
Newton, 1876; Neshola, 1836; Panola, 
1870 (newspaper files since 1840); Tish- 
amingo, 1877; Wayne, 1892. Mrs. Car- 
ruth also says, "Since the Mississippi 
law forbids county clerks or anyine 
employed in their offices to do any 
research work, it is of no use to con- 
tact any of them by letter.'^ 

The Evans Memorial Library, Aber- 
deen, Miss., has a collection of tens 
of thousands of manuscripts, old church 
records, account books, letters, etc., all 
indexed in a card file. This is their an- 
nouncement: 

"The Manuscript Division of the Evans 
Memorial Library is inaugurating a 
"March of Monroe County Families". 
The object of this is to have every fam- 
ily represented with a collection of man- 
uscript material in the files. By Manu- 
script is meant old letters, land grants, 
bills, paroles, clippings, diaries, account 
books, copied Bible records, scrapbooks, 
bulletins, old music, newspapers etc. A 
collection can be two, two hundred or 
two thousand! Yes, we have some family 
collections containing over 2,000! The 
Gifts will be recorded, then placed in 
manila folders labeled with the family 
name which the donor prefers, then 
placed in locked steel filing cabinets. 
Authors, historians, research people who 
come to the library, study these mater- 
ials for facts, descriptions, dates, names, 
etc., needed in their writing about the 



84 



THIRD EDITION OF THE HANDY BOOK FOR GENEALOGISTS 



South. From time to time, certain items 
are placed on display in the locked mus- 
eum case. These materials are never 
checked out but are used in the library. 

"This 'March' begins March 1, and 
closes June 1. These materials on our 
Southland are being burned, misplaced 
lost. Your library wants to help preserve 
bits of your heritage for your country, 
lor you. Let your families be represented 
v/on't you?" 

Other Mississippi libraries: 

Jackson, (Hinds). Carnegie Public Li- 
brary. 323 N. Congress St.; Meridian. 



(Lauderdale), City and County Public 
Library. 628 25th Ave. 

Books which have been published by gene- 
alogical and historical researchres may as- 
sist you in your Mississippi research: 

Hendricks, Mary Louise Flowers. Mis- 
sissippi Court Records from the Files ot ihc 
High Court ol Errors and Appeals. 1799- 
1559. Pub. 1950. 

Welch. Alice Tracy, Family Records 
Mississippi Revolutionary Soldiers. Pub. 
1953-56 by The Mississippi Society of the 
Daughters of the American Revolution. 
State Board of Management. 



Mississippi County Histories 

(Population figures to nearest thousand. 1950 Census) 



Name 

Adamfr 

Alcorn 

Amite 

Attala 

Benton 

Bolivar 

Calhoun 

Carroll 

Chickasaw 



Census 
Map Date Pop. Reports 

Index Formed By M Available 



Parent County 



County Seat 



Coahoma 

Colfax 

Copiah 

Covington 

DeSoto 

Forest 

Franklin 

George 

Greene 

Grenada 



Issaquena 

Itawamba 

Jackson 

Jasper 

Jefferson 

Jefferson 



El 
A4 
El 
C3 
A3 
Bl 
B3 
B2 
B3 



Choctaw C3 

Claiborne Dl 

Clarke D4 

Clay B4 



A2 

D2 
E3 
A2 
E3 
El 
F4 
E4 
B2 



Hancock F3 

Harrison F3 

Hinds D2 

Holmes C2 

Humphreys C2 



CI 

A4 
F4 
D3 
El 



1799 
1870 
1809 
1833 
1870 
1836 
1852 
1833 
1836 



1836 
1871 
1823 
1819 
1836 
1906 
1809 
1910 
1811 
1870 



32 

27 
19 
27 
9 
63 
18 
15 
19 



1833 11 

1802 12 

1833 19 

1871 18 



30 
16 
25 
45 
11 
10 
8 
19 



1812 12 

1841 84 

1821 142 

1833 33 

1918 23 

1844 5 

1836 17 

1812 31 

1833 19 

1799 11 



1820-80 

1870-80 

1820-80 

1840-80 

1880 

1840-80 

1860-80 

1840-80 

1840-80 

1840-80 
1820-80 
1840-80 
1880 



49 1840-30 



1820-80 
1820-80 
1840-80 

1820-80 

1820-80 
1870-80 

1820-80 
1850-80 
1830-80 
18 10-80 



1850-80 
1840-80 
1820-80 
1840-80 
1820-80 



Natchez District Natchez 

Tippaw. Tishomingo Corinth 

Wilkinson Liberty 

Choctaw Cession Kosciusko 

Marshall. Tippah Ashland 

Choctaw Cession .... Rosedale, Cleveland 

Lafayette Pittsboro 

Choctaw Cession Carrollton-Valden 

Chickasaw Cession 

of 1832 Houston-Okolona 

Chickasaw Session of 1832 .... Ackerman 

Jefferson Port Gibson 

Choctaw Cession Quitman 

Chickasaw, Lowndes. Monroe, 

Oktibbeha West Point 

Chickasaw Cession 1836 Clarksdale 

Name changed to Clay, 1876 

Hinds Hazelhurst 

Lawrence, Wayne Collins 

Indian Lands Hernando 

Perry Hattiesburg 

Adams Meadville 

Greene, Jackson Lucedale 

Amita. Franklin. Wayne Leakesville 

Carrol, Yalobusha. Choctaw, 

Talahatchie Grenada 

Mobile District Bay St. Louis 

Hancock. Jackson Gulfport 

Choctow Cession, 1820 .. Jackson-Raymond 

Yazoo Lexington 

Holmes, Washington, Yazoo, 

Sunflower Belzoni 

Washington Mayersville 

Chickasaw Cession, 1832 Fulton 

Mobile District Pascagoula 

Indian Lands Bay Springs, Paulding 

Natchez, originally Pickering .... Fayette 



MISSISSIPPI 



85 



Name 



Map 
Index 



Date Pop. 
Formed By M 



E2 
E3 
C4 
A3 
E3 



Davis 
Jones 
Kemper 
Lafayette 
Lamar 
Lauderdale D4 
Lawrence E2 
Leake C3 

Lee A4 

Leflore B2 



Lincoln 

Lowndes 

Madison 

Marion 

Marshall 

Monroe 

Montgomery B3 

Neshoba C3 

Newton 

Noxubee 

Oktibbeha 

Panola 



E2 
C4 
C2 
E2 
A3 
B4 



D3 
C4 
B4 
A2 



Pearl River F3 



Perry 

Pike 

Pontotoc 

Prentiss 

Quitman 

Rankin 

Scott 

Sharkey 



E3 
E2 
A3 
A4 
A2 
D2 
D3 
C2 



Simpson D2 

Smith D3 

Stone F3 

Sunflower B2 
Tallahatchie B2 

Tate A2 

Tippah A3 

Tishomingo A4 

Tunica A2 

Union A3 

Walthall E2 

Warren D2 

Washington CI 

Wayne E4 

Webster B3 



1906 
1826 
1833 
1836 
1904 
1833 
1814 
1833 
1866 
1871 

1870 
1830 
1828 
1811 
1836 
1821 
1871 
1833 
1836 
1833 
1833 
1836 
1890 
1820 
1815 
1836 
1870 
1877 
1828 
1833 
1876 

1824 
1833 
1916 
1844 
1833 

1873 
1836 
1836 
1836 
1870 
1914 
1809 
1827 
1809 
1871 



Wilkinson El 1802 
Winston C3 1833 
Yalobusha B3 1833 

Yazoo C2 1823 
U. S. Census Note: 



16 
57 
16 



13 
64 
13 
22 
38 
52 

28 
38 
34 
24 
25 
37 
14 
26 
23 
20 
25 
31 
21 
9 
35 
20 
20 
26 
29 
22 
13 

22 
17 
6 
56 
30 

18 
18 
16 
22 
20 
16 
40 
71 
17 
12 



Census 

Reports 

Available 



1830-80 
1840-80 



Parent County 



County Scat 



Covington, Lawrence Prentiss 

Covington, Wayne Ellisville, Laurel 

Choctaw Cession, 1832 DeKalb 



23 1840-80 Chickasaw Cession Oxford 



Marion Purvis 

1840-80 Choctaw Cession Meridian 

1820-80 Marion Monticello 

1840-80 Choctaw Cession Carthage 

1870-80 Itawamba, Pontotoc Tupelo 

1880 Carroll, Sunflower. Tallahatchie Green- 

wood, Amite, Pike, Lawrence, 

Franklin Brookhaven 

Monroe Columbus 

Yazoo Canton 

Amite, Wayne, Franklin Columbia 

Chickasaw Cession of 1832 .. Holly Springs 

Chickasaw Cession 1821 Aberdeen 

Carroll, Choctaw Winona 

Choctaw Cession 1830 Philadelphia 

Neshoba Decatur 

Choctaw Cession 1830 Macon 

Choctaw Cession 1830 Starkville 

Chickasaw Cession 1832 .. Batesville, Sardis 

Hancock Poplarville 

Greene New Augusta 

Marion Magnolia 

Chickasaw Cession of 1832 .... Pontotoc 

Tishomingo Booneville 

Panola, Coahoma Marks 

Hinds Brandon 

Choctaw Cession, 1832 Forest 

Warren, Washington, 

Issaquena Rolling Fork 

Choctaw Cession of 1820 .... Mendenhall 

Choctaw Cession of 1820 Raleigh 

Harrison Wiggins 

Bolivar Indianola 

Choctaw Cession 

of 1820 Charleston. Sumner 

Marshall, Tunica Senatobia 

Chickasaw Cession of 1832 Ripley 

Chickasaw Cession of 1832 luka 

Chickasaw Cession of 1832 Tunica 

Pontotoc, Tippah New Albany 

Marion, Pike Tylertown 

Natchez District Vicksburg 

Warren, Yazoo Greenville 

Washington Waynesboro 

Montgomery, Chickasaw, Choctaw, 
Oktibbeha, (originally Summer, 

name changed 1882) Walthall 

Adams Woodville 

Choctaw Cession of 1830 Louisville 

Choctaw Cession 

'30 Coffeyville, Water Valley 

Hinds Yazoo City 

1810 census reports are missing. 



1870-80 

1830-80 

1830-80 

1820-80 

1840-80 

1820-80 

1880 

1840-80 

1840-80 

1840-80 

1840-80 

1840-80 

1820-80 

1820-80 

1840-80 

1870-80 

1880 

1830-80 

1840-80 

1880 

1830-80 
1840-80 

1850-80 
1840-80 

1880 

1840-80 

1840-80 

1840-80 

1880 

1820-80 
1820-80 
1820-80 
1880 



14 1820-80 
22 1840-80 

15 1840-80 

36 1830-80 

The 1800 and 



THIRD EDITION OF THE HANDY BOOK FOR GENEALOGISTS 



County Map of Mississippi 



D 




Missouri 

Capital, Jefferson City 

If you'll look at a map of the United From 1682 until 1803 control over the 

States, you'll notice that Missouri is in Missouri section was passed back and 

a peculiar position or relationship to the forth between France and Spain, In 

rest of the nation. Kansas City, Mo., the Louisiana Purchase consumated in 

for instance, is about equidistant from 1803 ownership passed into the hands of 

Washington, D.C. and Salt Lake City, the United States. 

Utah. Two states lie between Missouri In 1805 Missouri became part of the 

and the Canadian border, and two be- Territory of Louisiana and remained so 

tween Missouri and the Gulf of Mexico, until 1812 when it became a Territory 

The mileage between each of those ex- in its own name. At that time it claim- 

treme points and Kansas City is also ed a population of 20,000, Most of its 

about the same. For these reasons, it early settlers came from Kentucky and 

has been said that Missouri belongs to Virginia, and some from North and 

the east as well as the west, the north South Carolina, Maryland, Pennsylvania, 

as well as the south. and Tennessee. In those early days, In- 

The Mississippi, five hundred miles dian tribes, enticed by the British, con- 

of which is the eastern border of Mis- stantly scourged the Missouri settlers 

souri, was first seen by a white man in in severe plundering raids. It was not 

1541 when the Spanish explorer Her- until about 1815 that these raids were 

nando or Fernando De Soto saw that halted through peace treaties with the 

mighty river. It was 132 years later various Indian tribes within the terri- 

that two French explorers, Marquette tory. 

and Joliet, were the first to see the Missouri became a state in 1821. Then 
Missouri river. Only nine years later, it had about 56,000 white settlers. She 
in 1682, another French explorer, Ro- became the twenty-fourth state in the 
bert Cavelier de La Salle, took posses- Union. At present she has 114 counties 
sion of the section as part of Louisiana and one independent city, St, Louis, 
and claimed it for France, A Catholic For many decades after 1830 a steady 
mission was established on the present stream of European immigrants came 
site of St, Louis about 1700. The first into the state, as a result of which St. 
permanent Missouri settlement was es- Louis has a distinct German flavor, 
tablished about 1750 by the French. Many Irish, English, Polish, Swiss, Bo- 
It was located along the Mississippi hemian and Italian natives settled in 
about 50 miles south of St. Louis and various parts of the state. In his "Cre- 
was called Sainte Genevieve. oles of St. Louis," (1893), Paul Beck- 

The first actual American settlement with does full justice to the early 

in Missouri was in 1787 when one John French immigration, the so called Cre- 

Dodge established himself in Ste. Gene- oles, the Chouteaus, Gratiots, Cabannes, 

vieve County. He was followed there by Papins, Pauls, etc. 

Israel Dodge in 1790, and three years Throughout the Civil War, numerous 
later by Dr, Jesse Bryan, A John Moore skirmishes and bloody battles were 
is said to have made his home in 1790 fought in Missouri which was one of 
in what since then has become Perry the important battle grounds of the con- 
County which borders Ste. Genevieve flict, keeping the population in constant 
County on the southeast. In 1795 Amer- excitement and fear. 

ican settlements were established on Missouri has 3,954,653 inhabitants, 
Femme Osage creek in what is now which makes her the eleventh state in 
St. Charles County, north of St. Louis, population. About 61.5% of the popula- 
It was then called Upper Louisiana or tion live in cities, and 38.5% in the 
New Spain. Authority for these state- farming regions. The largest cities in 
ments comes from Pioneer Families of the state are St. Louis, 856,796; Kansas 
Missouri," published in 1876 by Wm. S. City, 456,622; St. Joseph, 78,588; Spring- 
Bryan and Robert Rose, and reprinted field, 66,731; University City, 39,892; 
in 1935 with an introduction by W. W. Joplin, 38,711; Independence, 39,693. 
Elwang. Birth and death dates after June 1, 



87 



88 



THIRD EDITION OF THE HANDY BOOK FOR GENEALOGISTS 



1907, are obtainable at the State Bureau 
of Vital Statistics, Jefferson City, Mis- 
souri. Births and deaths from 1883 to 
1891 may be obtained from the clerk 
of the respective counties. Information 
OH marriages from 1825 to date may 
be had at the office of the Recorder of 
Deeds in each county. In those offices 
are also the records of deeds. Wills are 
in the Probate Courts. Tax payer lists 
are in the offices of the county assessors. 
War .service records are under the care 
of the Adjutant General at Jefferson 
City, Mo. A law originating in 1863 
makes it permissible for the Recorder 
of Deeds in each county to file birth 
information on request. The first death 
recording began in St. Louis in 1841. 

Many of the county court houses in 
Missouri have been lost through fire. 
With them were lost at the same time 
many old records. 

Among organizations and institutiors 
able to give much genealogical informa- 
tion are the Nancy Hunter Chapter, 
Daughters of the American Revolution, 
Cape Girardeau, Mo., Ann Haynes Chap- 
ter, DAR. Kirksville, Mo., the Missouri 
Historical Society, St. Louis, Mo., the 
Missouri Valley Historical Society Kans- 
as City, Mo. 

The following libraries may also be 
of great assistance: 

Columbia, (Boone). University of Mis- 
souri Library, (Western Americana, books 
and manuscripts); Jefferson City, (Cole), 
State Library, State Office Bldg.; Kans- 
as City, (Jackson). City Public Library. 
9th «fe Locust Sts., Uocal and western 
history, genealogy); St. Louis, Missouri 
Historical Society Lfbrary, Jefferson 
Memorial Bldg.; County Library, 6814 
Natural Bridge Rd.; St. Louis Public Li- 
brary, Olive, 13th & 14th Sts., (genealogy 
and local history); Springfield, (Green), 
Public Library, Central & Jefferson Sts. 

From the secretary of State Histor- 
ical Society of Missouri, corner Hitt and 
Lowry Streets, Columbia, Mo., comes this 
information: 

"No official compilation of the vital 
statistics of Missouri has been issued 
and for the most part, such records as 



are still existant are to be found in the 
archives of the several counties. Regis- 
tration of births, marriages and deaths 
began in 1909 and are on file in the 
Bureau of Vital Statistics of the Mis- 
souri State Board of Health at Jeffer- 
son City. 

"The biographical sections of a num- 
ber of the general histories of Missouri 
and those in the histories of Missouri 
counties contain informaton of value to 
persons undertaking genealogcal re^ 
search. And, of course, numbers of sep- 
arate volumes on individual families of 
the state have been published. 

"The greater number of Missouri 
county histories are now out of print and 
can only be bought through second-hand 
book sellers. There are several dealers 
from whom some of these volumes 
might be obtained. 

"The MISSOURI HISTORICAL RE- 
VIEW is a quarterly magazine exclu- 
sively to Missouri history and biography. 
Biographical and genealogical informa- 
tion is frequently included in the articles 
on various phases of the state's history 
published in the Review, but we do 
not maintain a genealogical department 
or publish genealogical queries in the 
magazine. In certain early volumes of 
the Review a few articles of a gen- 
ealogical nature were published .such, 
as "Monumental Inscriptions in Missouri 
Cemeteries'* (Volumes 5, 6, 7 and 8), 
early marriage records of Carroll coun- 
ty, 1833-1852 (Volume 9. No. 2), and 
Pike County marriage records, 1818-1837 
(Volume 9, No. 3). The Review was 
fiist published in October, 1906 and com- 
plete unbound sets are available. 

"Our Society has an excellent collec- 
tion of general genealogical books and 
periodicals which is made available to 
anyone visiting our library. Unfortun- 
ately, because of the large number of 
requests we receive and the amount of 
time required for work of this kind, we 
find it impossible to undertake genea- 
logical research even for our members. 

"For anyone interested in enrolling 
as a member of the Society, the annual 
dues are $1, which includes a free sub- 
scription to the MISSOURI HISTORI- 
CAL REVIEW". 



MISSOURI 



89 



Missouri County Histories 

(Population figures to nearest thousand. 1950 Census) 

Prepared and published through the courtesy of 

MISS NANON L. CARR 

6102 the Paseo, Kansas City 10, Missouri 

Census 
Map Date Pop. Reports 

Name Index Formed By M Available Parent County County Seat 

Adair A2 1841 20 1850-80 Macon Kirksville 

Andrew Al 1841 12 1850-80 Platte Purchase Savannah 

Arkansas 1813 New Madrid 

(abolished 1819 when Territory of Arkansas was formed) 
Atchison Al 1845 11 1850-80 Holt Rockport 

(Part of Platte Purchase; attached to Holt co, until 1854; lost 10-mile strip 

to Iowa, 1848) 
Audrain B3 1836 24 1840-80 Monroe Mexico 

(Created in 1831, but remained attached to Callaway, Monroe, and Ralls cos. 

until 1836. In 1842 gained an additional 31 sq. miles from Monroe co.) 
Barry Dl 1835 22 1840-80 Greene Cassville 

(Error in survey, rectified in 1876, established the western line 2V-z miles 

east of previous boundary. In 1872 many records in circuit clerk's office 

were destroyed by fire) 
Barton Dl 1855 13 1860-80 Jasper Lamar 

(Courthouse burned in 1860; no mention of fate of records) 
Bates CI 1841 18 1850-80 Jackson Butler 

(Feb. 22, 1855. the three southern tiers of townships in Cass co. were 

added to Bates; courthouse burned in 1861; no mention of fate of records) 
Benton C2 1835 9 1840-80 Pettis, St. Clair Warsaw 

^Remained unorganized until Jan. 1837; in 1845, 24 sq. miles of n. w. part 

of Benton became parts of Pettis, and Hickory co. was created, reducing 

Benton to its present size) 
Bollinger D4 1851 11 1860-80 Cape Girardeau, Stoddard. 

Wayne Marble Hill 

(In 1866, courthouse destroyed by fire and with it some of the records; in 

1884, courthouse burned while occupied only by the county clerk's office) 

Boone C2 1820 48 1830-80 Howard Columbia 

Buchanan Bl 1839 97 1840-80 Platte Purchase Saint Joseph 

Butler E4 1849 38 1850-80 Wayne Poplar Bluff 

Caldwell B2 1836 10 1840-80 Ray Kingston 

(April 19, 1860, courthouse destroyed by fire, together with all records 

except those of the probate court; Nov. 28, 1896, courthouse destroyed by 

fire) 

Callaway C3 1820 23 1830-80 Montgomery Fulton 

Camden C2 1841 8 1850-80 Benton. Pulaski Camdenton 

(Organized as Kinderhook, renamed Feb. 23, 1843; line between Camden 

and Miller changed in 1845) 
Cape Girardeau D4 1812 38 1830-80 Original District Jackson 

(Present size since Mar. 5. 1849; in 1870 courthouse burned; no mention 

of fate of record ) 

Carroll B2 1833 16 1840-80 Ray Carrollton 

Carter D3 1859 5 1860-80 Ripley. Shannon Van Buren 

Cass CI 1835 19 1850-80 Jackson Harrisonville 

(Organized as Van Buren renamed Feb. 19, 1849; three southern tiers of 

townships relinquished to Bates co.. Feb. 22, 1855) 

Cedar CI 1845 11 1850-80 Dade, St. Clair Stockton 

Chariton B2 1820 15 1830-80 Howard Kaytesville 

(Courthouse burned Sept. 20, 1864; only a few records lost) 
Christian D2 1859 12 1860-80 Greene, Taney, Webster Ozark 

(Sources differ on date organized, some say Mar. 8. 1859. others Mar. 8, 

1860; county seat, Ozark, selected May 1859; courthouse burned in 1865; 

no mention of fate of records) 



90 THIRD EDITION OF THE HANDY BOOK FOR GENEALOGISTS 

Census 
Map Date Pop. Reports 

Name Index Formed By M Available Parent County County Seat 

Clark (old) 1818 Arkansas 

(Never organized; abolished in 1819 when Territory of Arkansas was 
created) 

Clark A3 1836 9 1840-80 Lewis Kahoka 

Clay Bl 1822 45 1830-80 Ray Liberty 

Clinton Bl 1833 12 1840-80 Clay Plattsburg 

Cole C2 1820 35 1830-80 Cooper Jefferson City 

Cooper C2 1818 17 1830-80 Howard Eoonville 

Crawford C3 1829 12 1830-80 Gasconade Steelville 

(1829-1835 county court records lost; courthouse burned Feb. 15, 1873; 
courthouse burred Jan. 5, 1884; no mention of fate of records) 

Dade Dl 1841 9 1850-80 Greene Greenfield 

(Lost 10-mile strip on northern boundary to Cedar co., and 9-mile strip on 
southern boundary to Lawrence co., reducing it to its present limits, Mar. 
28, 1845; courthouse burned in 1863, but records had been removed to 
safety) 

Dallas D2 1844 10 1850-80 Polk Buffalo 

(Organized 1842 as Niangua co.; in 1844 boundaries slightly changed and 
name changed to Dallas; courthouse burned Oct. 18, 1863; second court- 
house burned July 30, 1864, and records destroyed; the replaced records 
were burned Sept. 3, 1867) 

Daviess A2 1836 11 1840-80 Ray Gallatin 

DeKalb Al 1845 8 1850-80 Clinton Maysville 

(In 1878 courthouse burned, many records being destroyed, but records of 
circuit clerk's office were preserved along with a few papers of other 
offices) 

Dent D3 1851 11 1860-80 Crawford, Shannon Salem 

(Courthouse burned in 1864, destroying some of the court records) 

Dodge 1851 Putnam 

(Discontinued in 1853; had lost territory when Iowa boundary was estab- 
lished, bringing its area below the constitutional limit of 400 sq. miles; its 
territory was added to Putnam co.) 

Douglas D2 1857 13 1860-80 Ozark, Taney Ava 

(Territory increased in 1864 by addition of portions of Taney and Web- 
ster COS.) 

Dunklin E4 1845 45 1850-80 Stoddard Kennett 

(In 1853 a strip one mile wide was taken from Stoddard and added to 
northern boundary; courthouse burned during Civil War; in 1872 a newly- 
completed courthouse burned with all the records; all records prior to 1872 
are lost) 

Franklin C3 1818 36 1830-80 St. Louis Union 

(Boundaries not accurately defined until 1845) 

Gasconade C3 1820 12 1830-80 Franklin Hermann 

(In 1869 relinquished 36 sq. miles to Crawford Co.) 

Gentry Al 1841 11 1850-80 Clinton Albany 

(Organization completed 1843; Mar. 6, 1885 courthouse burned with all 
county records) 

Greene D2 1833 105 1840-80 Crawford Springfield 

(Courthouse burned in 1861; no mention of fate of records) 

Grundy A2 1841 13 1850-80 Livingston Trenton 

Harrison A2 1845 14 1850-80 Daviess Bethany 

(Jan. 7, 1874, courthouse destroyed by fire; land books, court records, 
probate records and most of the county records were saved ; tax books were 
destroyed) 

Hempstead 1818 Arkansas 

(Abolished 1819 when Territory of Arkansas was created) 

Henry CI 1834 20 1850-80 Lafayette Clinton 

(Originally Rives co.; name changed Oct. 15, 1841) 

Hickory C2 1845 5 1850-80 Benton, Polk Hermitage 

(Courthouses burned 1852 and 1881; many records destroyed) 



MISSOURI 91 

Census 
Map Date Pop. Reports 

Name Index Formed By M Available Parent County County Scat 

Holt Al 1841 10 1850-80 Platte Purchase Oregon 

Howard B2 1816 12 1830-80 St. Charles, St. Louis Fayette 

(Courthouse burned 1887; no mention of fate of records) 

Howell E2 1857 23 1860-80 Oregon, Ozark West Plains 

(Courthouse destroyed during Civil War no mention of fate of r-ocords) 
Iron D3 1857 9 1860-80 Dent, Madison, Reynolds, St. Francis. 

Washington, Wayne Ironton 

Jackson Bl 1826 541 1830-80 Lafayette Independence 

(Nearly all its territory was acquired frm Osage and Kansas Indians, 
June 2, 1825) 

Jasper Dl 1841 79 1850-80 Newton Carthage 

(Courthouse destroyed in 1863; records had been removed and were re- 
turned in 1865; courthouse burned in 1883; no mention of fate of records) 

Jefferson C4 1818 38 1830-80 Ste. Genevieve. St. Louis Hillsboro 

Johnson CI 1834 21 1840-80 Lafayette Warrenburg 

Kinderhook 1841 Benton, Pulaski 

(Renamed Camden Feb. 23, 1843) 

Knox A3 1845 8 1850 80 Scotland Edina 

Laclede D2 1849 19 1850-80 Camden. Pulaski. Wright Lebanon 

Lafayette B2 1820 25 1830-80 Cooper Lexington 

(Originally called Lillard; changed Feb. 16, 1825) 

Lawrence (old) 1815 New Madrid 

(Abolished 1818) 

Lawrence Dl 1845 23 1850-80 Barry, Dade Mount Vernon 

Lewis B3 1833 11 1840-80 Marion Monticello 

Lillard 1820 Cooper 

(Changed to Lafayette, Feb. 16, 1825) 

Lincoln C3 1818 13 1830-80 St. Charles Troy 

Linn B2 1837 19 1840-80 Chariton Linneus 

Livingston B2 1837 17 1840-80 Carroll Chillicothe 

McDonald Dl 1849 14 1850-80 Newton Pineville 

(In 1876 an error in survey was corrected, establishing a new eastern line 
which annexed a 2M; mile strip previously included in Barry co.; in 1863. 
courthouse and records were burned) 

Macon B2 1837 18 1840-80 Randolph Macon 

Madison D4 1818 10 1830-80 Cape Girardeau, Ste. 

Genevieve Fredericktown 

Maries C3 1855 7 1860-80 Osage, Pulaski Vienna 

(In 1859 and 1868, small tracts of land were exchanged with Phelps co.; 
Nov. 6, 1868 courthouse burned with nearly all the records) 

Marion B3 1826 30 1830-80 Ralls Palmyra 

Mercer A2 1845 7 1850-80 Grundy Princeton 

(March 24, 1898, courthouse burned; nearly all records of the circuit clerk 
and recorder, treasurer, and sheriff were destroyed or badly damaged; re- 
cords in office of probate judge and county clerk were saved, but many 
were badly damaged) 

Miller C2 1837 14 1840-80 Cole Tuscumbia 

(Line between Camden and Miller changed 1845; territory from Morgan 
annexed 1860; minor changes in 1868) 

Mississippi E4 1845 23 1850-80 Scott Charleston 

Moniteau C2 1845 11 1850-80 Cole, Morgan California 

Monroe B3 1831 11 1840-80 Ralls Paris 

Montgomery C3 1818 12 1830-80 St. Charles Montgomery City 

(County records burned in 1864) 

Morgan 02 1833 10 1840-80 Cooper Versailles 

(Courthouse burned 1887; no mention of fate of records) 

New Madrid E4 1812 39 1830-80 Original district New Madrid 

Newton Dl 1838 28 1840-80 Barry Neosho 

(In 1846 a strip two miles wide was detached from Newton and attached 
to Jasper; courthouse burned 1862; no mention of fate of records) 



92 THIRD EDITION OF THE HANDY BOOK FOR GENEALOGISTS 

Census 
Map Date Pop. Reports 

Name Index Formed By M Available Parent County County Seat 

Niangua 1842 Polk 

(BouiK^aries slightly changed and name changed to Dallas, Dec. 10, 1844) 

Nodaway Al 1845 24 1850-80 Andrew Maryville 

Oregon E3 1845 12 1850-80 Ripley Alton 

(Courthouse burned during Civil War; no mention of fate of records) 
Osage C3 1841 11 1850-80 Gasconade Linn 

(Mar, 1, 1855, boundaries between Osage and Pulaski defined Nov. 15, 1880, 

courthouse burned; fireproof vaults saved records) 



County Map of Missouri 


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MISSOURI 



93 



Census 
Map Date Pop. Reports 

Name Index Formed By M Available Parent County County Seat 

Ozark E2 1841 9 1850-80 Taney Gainesville 

Pemiscot E4 1851 46 1860-80 New Madrid Caruthersville 

(Courthouse and contents burned 1883) 

Perry D4 1820 15 1830-80 Ste. Genevieve Perryville 

Pettis C2 1833 32 1840-80 Cooper. Saline Sedalia 

Phelps C3 1857 22 1S60-80 Crawford, Pulaski, Maries Rolla 

Pike B3 1818 17 1830-80 St. Charles Bowling Green 

(Courthouse burned 1864; no mention of fate of records) 

Platte Bl 1838 15 1840-80 Platte Purchase Platte City 

(Attached to Clay for civil and military purpose from Dec. 1836 to Dec. 
31. 1838) 

Polk D2 1835 16 1840-80 Greene Bolivar 

Pulaski (old) 1818 Franklin 

(Organization not perfected and much of its territory became Gasconade in 
1820; abolished 1819 when Territory of Arkansas was created) 

Pulaski D2 1833 10 1840-80 Crawford Waynesville 

Putnam A2 1845 9 1850-80 Linn Unionville 

(When Iowa boundary was established, the areas of both Putnam and 
Dodge were below the constitutional limit; Dodge disorganized in 1853 and 
its territory was regained by Putnam) 

Ralls B.'' 1820 9 1830-80 Pike New London 

Randolph B2 1829 23 1830-80 Chaiiton Huntsville 

(A few records lost when courthouse burned 1880) 

Ray Bl 1820 16 1830-80 Howard Richmond 

Reynolds D3 1845 7 1850-80 Shannon Centerville 

(Courthouse burned during Civil War; no mention of damage to records) 

Ripley E3 1833 11 1840-80 Wayne Doniphan 

Rives 1834 Lafayette 

(Name changed to Henry, Oct. 15. 1841) 

St. Charles C4 1812 30 1830-80 Original district St. Charles 

St. Clair CI 1841 10 1850-80 Rives (later Henry) Osceola 

St. Francois D4 1821 35 1830-80 Jefferson. Ste. Genvieve, 

Washington Farmington 

Ste. Genevieve D4 1812 11 1830-80 Original district Ste. Genevieve 

St. Louis C4 1812 406 1830-80 Original district Clayton 

St. Louis CityC4 1764 857 1830-80 St. Louis 

Saline B2 1820 27 1830-80 Cooper Marshall 

Schuyler A3 1845 6 1850-80 Adair Lancaster 

Scotland A3 1841 7 j850-80 Lewis Memphis 

Scott E4 1821 33 1830-80 New Madrid Benton 

Shannon D3 1841 8 1850-80 Ripley. Washington Eminence 

(Courthouse destroyed during Civil War; no mention of fate of records) 

Shelby B3 1835 10 1840-80 Marion Shelbyville 

Stoddard E4 1835 33 1840-80 Cape Giradeau Bloomfield 

(Courthouse burned 1864. but records had been removed to safety) 

Stone Dl 1851 10 1860-80 Taney Galena 

Sullivan A2 1845 11 1850-80 Linn Milan 

Taney E2 1837 10 , 1840-80 Greene Forsyth 

(County records destroyed by fire 1885) 

Texas D2 1845 19 1850-80 Shannon, Wright Houston 

Van Buren 1835 Jackson 

(Name changed to Cass, Feb. 19. 1849) 

Vernon CI 1855 23 1860-80 Bates Nevada 

(Created Feb. 15, 1851. but act was declared unconstitutional since its ter- 
ritory was exactly that of Bates; legally created Feb. 27, 1855; reorganized 
Oct. 17, 1865 after total suspension of civil order during Civil War; court- 
house destroyed during that period but clerk had taken the records with 
him when he joined the army and all records were later recovered except 
one deed book) 



94 THIRD EDITION OF THE HANDY BOOK FOR GENEALOGISTS 

Census 
Map Date Pop. Reports 

Name Index Formed By M Available Parent County County Seat 

Warren 03 1833 8 1840-80 Montgomery Warrenton 

Washington 03 1813 15 1830-80 Ste. Genevieve Potosi 

Wayne D3 1818 11 1830-80 Cape Girardeau Greenville 

(Courthouse burned with all the records 1854) 
Webster D2 1855 15 1860-80 Greene. Wright Marshfield 

(Courthouse burned 1863 but records were saved with the exception of 

tax rolls and election returns) 

Worth Al 1861 5 1870-80 Gentry Grant City 

Wright D2 1841 16 1850-80 Pulaski Hartville 

(1864 courthouse burned, destroying many records; 1897 courthouse 

destroyed with all its records) 

BIBLIOGRAPHY 
Conrad, Howard L. Encyclopedia of the History of Missouri, 6 vols. New York: 1901 
Missouri: A Guide to the "Show Me" State: American Guide Series, New York: 1941 
Violette, Eugene Morrow. A History of Missouri. 1918 (Reprint, Cape Girardeau: 

1951) 
Williams, Walter. A History of Northwest Missouri. 3 vols. Chicago: 1915. 



Montana 



Capital, Helena 

At least sixteen tribes of Indians Germany, England, Russia, and Sweeden. 

roamed over Montana when white e\- I" 1952 Montana had a population of 

, ... • * *u f 591,024 of which 43.7 per cent lived in 

plorers first came mto the section. . ' ... ^ kc o * * 

*^ its cities and 56.3 per cent roaming its 

Traders from France, Scotland and Eng- ^ills and valleys. The extent of its 

land were the first whites to visit there, wide-open spaces is indicated by the 

The eastern part of Montana was part density of its population — four persons 

of the Louisiana Purchase in 1803. Mem- per square mile. 

bers of the Lewis and Clark Expedition The State has 56 counties. Of the or- 

crossed the state in 1805 en route west igmai counties, nine were formed in 

and on the return trip in 1806. 1864 and two in 1865. Eleven counties 

The western part of Montana was in- have census reports available from 1860 

eluded in the section that came to the on. 

Uniied States in 1846 through the Ore- Birth and death records from June 

gon Treaty. 1907 to the present are at the office of 

The first influx of people really al- the Stale Registrar, State Board of 

traded to Montana was in 1862 when Health, Helena, Montana. No birth and 

gold was discovered in what is now Mad- death records are available before 1907, 

ison county, southeast of Butte. About with the exception of Bozeman, Great 

tv-enty years later, copper and silver Falls, and Helena at the office of the 

were found in the Butte region. To county ckrk. Butte and Missoula have 

work the resulting mines, many workers some records in the office of the city 

were shipped in from Ireland, Germany, health department. 

Austria, Poland, and Czechoslovakia. Marriage license information is at the 

In 1864 Montana became an organized office of the county clerks, where records 

Territory. Prior to this, various parts of wills, probate matters, deeds and 

of the section had belonged at sundry land records also are available, 

times to surrounding Territories, in- Library facilities in Montana are in 

eluding those of Missouri, Nebraska, keeping with its population. Libraries 

Oregon, Washington, and Idaho. are established in about seventy-five 

Montana became the forty-first state cities. Among the larger libraries, most 
late in 1889. From then on many people of which have fine historical collections, 
were attracted to the state for agricul- are the Historical Society of Montana 
lural and livestock reasons. People to at Helena, the public libraries at Bil- 
till the soil and herd the flocks of sheep lings, Butte. Missoula, and Great Falls, 
and cattle that roamed the wide-stretch- and the Montana State University Li- 
ed hills came from Canada, Norway, brary at Missoula. 



MONTANA 



95 



Montana County Histories 



(Population fi 



Map 
Index 

E4 
B4 
C2 
D3 
C4 
A4 
D2 
D2 
A3 
Al 
A2 
E3 
A3 
C2 
El 
D3 
B2 
El 



Name 

Beaverhead 

Big Horn 

Blaine 

Broadwater 

Carbon 

Carter 

Cascade 

Chouteau 

Custer 

Daniels 

Dawson 

Deer Lodge 

Fallon 

Fergus 

Flathead 

Gallaton 

GarfieM 

Glacier 

Golden 

Valley 
Granite 
Hill 

Jefferson 
Judith Basin D2 
Lake E2 

Lewis and 

Clark 
Liberty 
Lincoln 
McCone 
Madison 
Meagher 
Mineral 
Missoula 
Musselshell 
Park 

Petroleum 
Phillips 
Pondera 
Powder 



C3 
E3 
Dl 
E3 



E2 
D2 
Fl 
A2 
E4 
D3 
F2 
E2 
C3 
D4 
C2 
B2 
E2 



River 
Powell 
Prairie 
Ravalli 
Richland 
Roosevelt 
Rosebud 
Sanders 
Sheridan 
Silver Bow 
Stillwater 



A4 
E2 
A3 
F3 
A2 
A2 
B3 
F2 
Al 
E3 
C4 



Sweet Grass D3 
Teton E2 
Toole Dl 
Treasure B3 
Valley B2 
Wheatland D3 
Wilbaux A3 
Yellowstone C3 

Census Note: 
portion). 



Date 
Formed 

1864 
1913 
1912 
1897 
1895 
1917 
1887 
1864 
1865 
1920 
1865 
1864 
1913 
1885 
1893 
1864 
1919 
1915 

1920 
1893 
1912 
1864 
1920 
1923 

1864 
1920 
1909 
1919 
1864 
1864 
1914 
1864 
1911 
1887 
1917 
1915 
1919 

1921 
1901 
1915 
1893 
1914 
1919 
1901 
1906 
1911 
1881 
1913 
1895 
1893 
1914 
1919 
1893 
1917 
1914 
1893 



Pop. 
By M 
7 

10 
9 
3 

10 
3 

53 
7 

13 
4 
9 

17 
4 

14 

31 

22 
2 

10 

1 

3 
14 

4 

3 
14 

25 
2 
9 
3 
6 
2 
2 

35 
5 

12 
1 
6 
6 

3 

6 

2 
13 
10 
10 

7 

7 

7 
48 

5 

4 

7 

7 

1 
11 

3 

2 
56 



gures to nearest thousand. 1950 Census 

Census 

Reports 
Available 

1860-80 
1860-80 



For all of the 



Parent County Countv Seat 

Original county Dillon 

Rosebud Hardin 

Chouteau, Hill Chinook 

Jefferson, Meagher Townsend 

Park, Yellowstone Red Lodge 

Custer Ekalaka 

Chouteau, Meagher Great Falls 

1860-80 Original county Fort Benton 

Original county Miles City 

Valley Scobey 

1860-80 Original county Glendive 

1860-80 Original county Anaconda 

Custer Baker 

Meagher Lewistown 

Missoula Kalispell 

1860-80 Original county Bozeman 

Valley, McCone Jordan 

Flathead, Teton Cut Bank 

Musselshell Ryegate 

Deer Lodge Philipsburg 

Chouteau Havre 

1860-80 Original county Boulder 

Fergus, Cascade Stanford 

Flathead, Missoula Poison 

1860-80 Original county Helena 

Chouteau Chester 

Flathead Libby 

Dawson, Richland Circle 

1860-80 Original county Virginia City 

1860-80 Original county .... White Sulpher Springs 
Missoula Superior 

1860-80 Original county Missoula 

Fergus, Meagher Roundup 

Gallatin Livingston 

Fergus, Garfield Winnett 

Valley Malta 

Yellowstone Conrad 



Custer Broadus 

Missoula Deer Lodge 

Custer Terry 

Missoula Hamilton 

Dawson Sidney 

Valley, Richland Wolf Point 

Dawson Forsyth 

Missoula Thompson Falls 

Custer Plentywood 

Deer Lodge Butte 

Sweet Grass, Yellowstone .— Columbus 
Meagher, Park, Yellowstone .. Big Timber 

Chouteau Choteau 

Teton Shelby 

Big Horn Hyshani 

Dawson Glasgow 

Meagher, Sweet Grass Harlowton 

Dawson Wibaux 

Gallatin, Meagher, Custer Billings 

1860 census see Nebraska, vol. 1, (unorganized 



96 



THIRD EDITION OF THE HANDY BOOK FOR GENEALOGISTS 



County Map of Montana 



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Nebraska 



Capital, Lincoln 



Nebraska was long a choice spot for 
several rather belligerent Indian tribes. 
The first settlers were stragglers of the 
California Gold Rush days and the Ore- 
gon migration. Others unused to moun- 
tain terrain returned to the level lands 
of Nebraska which had formed a de- 
lightful picture in their memory as they 
were westward bound. 

The first settlement was established 
in 1823. It was called Bellevue, and is 
situated less than ten miles below Omaha 
on the Missouri. 

Nebraska was part of the Missouri 
Territory before 1820. In 1834 it was 
carved into three sections and placed 
under the supervision of Arkansas, Mi- 
chigan and the state of Missouri. Twenty 
years later it became a Territory in its 
own name, including sections of Colorado, 
Montana, North and South Dakota, and 
Wyoming. 

All during the 1850's many Germans 
settled in Nebraska. Twenty years later 
a large contingent of Germans came out 
of Russia and settled Lancaster and 
nearby counties. Many Scandinavians 
established homes there after the adop- 
tion of the Homestead Act of 1862. 

In 1861 Nebraska was admitted to the 
union — the thirty-seventh state. Many 
Civil War veterans secured cheap land 
after the close of that struggle. 

Most Nebraskans of today are of Ger- 
man, Czech, Swedish or Russian descent. 



The 1950 census gave Nebraska a 
population of 1,325,510 with 46.9 per cent 
living in cities and 53.1 per cent in the 
agricultural district. The density of the 
population is 17.2 persons per square 
mile. 

Among its leading cities are Omaha, 
251,117; Lincoln, 98,884; Grand Island, 
22,682; Hastings, 20,211; North Platte, 
15,533; Fremont, 14,762. 

Birth and death records since 1904 and 
marriage records since 1909 are at the 
Bureau of Vital Statistics, State De- 
partment of Health, Lincoln, Nebraska. 
Prior to those dates, the birth, death and 
marriage records are available at the 
offices of the county clerks, where wills 
and probate matters are recorded. 

Land records, such as deeds, mort- 
gages and all land titles are recorded 
in the office of the Register of Deeds 
in the various county seats. 

The earliest census record of any Ne- 
braska county is that of 1860. The State 
has 92 counties. Of the 24 original count- 
ies one was formed in 1853, fourteen 
were formed in 1854, seven in 1855, and 
two in 1857. 

Nebraska Libraries — Lincoln, (Lan- 
caster), Nebraska State Historical Li- 
brary, Capital Bldg., (local manuscripts, 
newspapers of state, midwest lore) ; Uni- 
versity of Nebraska, Don L. Love Me- 
morial Library, (history of Great Plains 
region); Omaha, (Douglas), Public Li- 
brary, Harney & 19th Sts. 



Nebraska County Histories 

Population figures to nearest thousand, 1950 Census] 



Name 



Census 
Map Date Pop. Reports 

Index Formed By M Available 



Adams 


C3 


1870 


29 


1870-80 


Antelope 


B2 


1875 


12 


1880 


Arthur 


E2 


1888 


1 




Banner 


F2 


1888 


1 




Blaine 


D2 


1885 


1 




Boone 


B2 


1871 


11 


1880 


Box Butte 


F2 


1886 


12 




Boyd 


CI 


1890 


5 




Brown 


D2 


1883 


5 




Buffalo 


C3 


1857 


25 


1860-80 


Burt 


A2 


1855 


12 


1860-80 


Butler 


B3 


1857 


11 


1860-80 


Cass 


A3 


1854 


16 


1860-80 


Cedar 


Bl 


1855 


14 


1860-80 



Parent County County Seat 

Clay Hastings 

Pierce Neligh 

Unorganized Territory Arthur 

Cheyenne Harrisburg 

Custer Brewster 

Platte Albion 

Unorganized Territory Alliance 

Holt Butte 

Unorganized Territory Ainsworth 

Original county Kearney 

Original county Tekamah 

Unorganized Territory David City 

Original county Plattsmouth 

Original county Hartington 



97 



98 



THIRD EDITION OF THE HANDY BOOK FOR GENEALOGISTS 



Name 



Census 
Map Date Pop. Reports 

Index Formed By M Available 



Chase 


E3 


1873 


5 


1880 


Cherry 


E2 


1883 


8 




Cheyenne 


F3 


1867 


12 


1870-80 


Clay 


B3 


1857 


9 


1860-80 


Colfax 


B2 


1865 


10 


1870-80 


Cuming 


B2 


1860 


13 


1860-80 


Custer 


D3 


1875 


19 


1880 


Dakota 


A2 


1854 


10 


1860-80 


Dawes 


Fl 


1885 


10 




Dawson 


D3 


1871 


19 


1860-80 


Deuel 


E3 


1888 


3 




Dixon 


B2 


1853 


9 


1860-80 


Dodge 


B2 


1855 


26 


1860-80 


Douglas 


A3 


1854 


281 


1860-80 


Dundy 


E4 


1873 


4 


1880 


Fillmore 


B3 


1865 


10 


1860-80 


Franklin 


C4 


1867 


7 


1870-80 


Frontier 


D3 


1872 


5 


1880 


Furnas 


D4 


1877 


9 


1880 


Gage 


A4 


1855 


28 


1860-80 


Garden 


E2 


1887 


4 




Garfield 


C2 


1884 


3 




Gosper 


D4 


1877 


3 


1880 


Grant 


E2 


1887 


1 




Greeley 


C2 


1875 


6 


1880 


Hall 


C3 


1855 


32 


1860-80 


Hamilton 


B3 


1870 


9 


1870-80 


Harlan 


C4 


1871 


7 


1880 


Hayes 


D3 


1873 


2 


1880 


Hitchcock 


D4 


1873 


6 


1880 


Holt 


C2 


1876 


15 


1880 


Hooker 


E2 


1889 


1 




Howard 


C3 


1871 


7 


1880 


Jefferson 


B4 


1872 


14 


1870-80 


Johnson 


A3 


1854 


7 


1860-80 


Kearney 


C3 


1854 


6 


1860-80 


Keith 


E3 


1873 


7 


1880 


Keya Paha 


Dl 


1884 


2 




Kimball 


F3 


1888 


4 




Knox 


Bl 


1854 


15 


1860-80 


Lancaster 


A3 


1854 


120. 


1860-80 


Lincoln 


D3 


1867 


27 


1870-80 


Logan 


D2 


1885 


1 




Loup 


C2 


1883 


1 




McPherson 


D2 


1887 


1 




Madison 


B2 


1865 


24 


1860-80 


Merrick 


B3 


1854 


9 


1860-80 


Morrill 


F2 


1887 


8 




Nance 


B3 


1879 


7 




Nemaha 


A3 


1855 


11 


1860-80 


Nuckolls 


B4 


1871 


10 


1860-80 


Otoe 


A3 


1854 


17 


1860-80 


Pawnee 


A4 


1854 


7 


1860-80 


Perkins 


E3 


1887 


7 




Phelps 


C3 


1873 


9 


1880 


Pierce 


B2 


1867 


9 


1870-80 


Platte 


B2 


1854 


20 


1860-80 


Polk 


B3 


1854 


8 


1860-80 



Parent County County Seat 

Unorganized Territory Imperial 

Unorganized Territory Valentine 

Unorganized Territory Sidney 

Original county Clay Center 

Dodge Schuyler 

Burt Westpoint 

Unorganized Territory Broken Bow 

Original county Dakota 

Sioux Chadron 

Buffallo Lexington 

Cheyenne Chappell 

Original county Ponca 

Original county Fremont 

Original county Omaha 

Unorganized Territory Benkelman 

Unorganized Territory Geneva 

Kearney Org. 1871 Franklin 

Unorganized Territory ,.... Stockville 

Unorganized Territory Beaver City 

Original county Beatrice 

Unorganized Territory Oshkosh 

Wheeler Burwell 

Unorganized Territory Elwood 

Unorganized Territory Hyannis 

Boone Greeley 

Original county Grand Island 

York Aurora 

Unorganized Territory Alma 

Unorganized Territory Hayes Center 

Unorganized Territory Trenton 

Knox O'Neill 

Unorganized Territory Mullen 

Hall Saint Paul 

Gage Fairbury 

Original county Tecumseh 

Original county Minden 

Lincoln Ogallala 

Brown, Rock Springview 

Cheyenne Kimball 

Formerly L'Eau Qui Court Center 

Original county Lincoln 

Unorganized Territory North Platte 

Custer Stapleton 

Unorganized Territory Taylor 

Lincoln, Keith Tryon 

Platte Madison 

Original county Central City 

Cheyenne Bridgeport 

Merrick Fullerton 

Original county Auburn 

Clay Nelson 

Original county Nebraska City 

Original county Pawnee City 

Keith Grant 

Unorganized Territory Holdrege 

Madison Pierce 

Original county Columbus 

Original County Osceola 



NEBRASKA 



99 



County Map of Nebraska 




100 



THIRD EDITION OF THE HANDY BOOK FOR GENEALOGISTS 



Census 
Map Date Pop. Reports 

Name Index Formed By M Available Parent County County Scat 

Red Willow D4 1873 13 1880 Frontier McCook 

Richardson A4 1855 17 1860-80 Original county Falls City 

Rock C2 1888 3 Brown Bassett 

Saline B3 1871 14 1860-80 Gage. Lancaster Wilber 

Sarpy A3 1854 16 1860-80 Original county Papillion 

Saunders A3 1865 17 1870-80 Sarpy, Douglas Wahoo 

Scotts Bluff F2 1888 34 Cheyenne Gering 

Seward B3 1867 13 1870-80 Lancaster Seward 

Sheridan E2 1885 10 Sioux Rushville 

Sherman C3 1873 6 1880 Buffalo Loup City 

Sioux F2 1877 3 1880 Unorganized Territory Harrison 

Stanton B2 1865 6 1870-80 Dodge Stanton 

Thayer B4 1872 11 1880 Jefferson Hebron 

Thomas D2 1887 1 Blaine Thedford 

Thurston A2 1865 9 1870-80 Burt Pender 

Valley C2 1871 7 1880 Unorganized Territory Ord 

Washington A2 1854 12 1860-80 Original county Blair 

Wayne B2 1867 10 1870-80 Thurston Wayne 

Webster C4 1871 7 1880 Unorganized Territory Red Cloud 

Wheeler C2 1877 2 Boone Bartlett 

York B3 1854 14 1860-80 Original county York 

Census Notes on Nebraska: The following discontinued counties have census 
figures as indicated, Blackbird, 1870; Calhoun, 1860; Jackson, 1870; Jones, 1860; 
L'Eau qui Court, 1860 and 1870, see Knox County; Shorter, 1860; Taylor, 1870; 
Thurston, 1870, see Blackbird County; Winnebago Indian Reservation, 1870; (Un- 
organized portion): 1860; (Schedules not bearing names of counties represent por- 
tions of Nebraska Territory (1860) now included in the states of Montana and Wy- 
oming.) 



Nevada 



Capital, Carson City 



Twelve years after the Mormon 
Pioneers had reached the Great Salt 
Lake City, gold and silver were found 
in the Comstock Mine in Virginia City, 
Nevada, midway — twenty or twenty-five 
miles — between Reno and Carson City. 
The strike was rich enough to turn Cal- 
ifornia gold seekers eastward. Almost 
overnight, the Nevada population, which 
up to that time iiad stood around a 
thousand, doubled over and over again. 
Among Europeans attracted by the rich 
mineral discovery were people from all 
sections of Britain, Italy, Scandinavia, 
Germany, and France. Many Mexicans 
came also. 

Nevada became a territory in 1861 and 
three years later was admitted into the 
union as the thirty-sixth state. 

New discoveries of rich ore deposits in 
different sections of the state have 
gradually increased the population to 



160,083, which is the smallest of any 
of the states in the union. However, the 
population has had a tremendous in- 
crease since 1940 when the census fig- 
ures were about 50,000 less than those 
of 1950. In recent years, farming and 
grazing has attracted permanent set- 
tlers. Many Mormons have settled in the 
state and several communities are al- 
most entirely of that religious faitri. 
Still, the Catholics predominate, the ma- 
jority of the miners and smelter work- 
workers belonging to that church. 

The state is the sixth in area and the 
forty-eighth in population. Nevada has 
seventeen counties. All nine of the or- 
iginal counties were formed in 1861. Only 
one of its present counties has census 
figures available from the 1860 census, 
Humboldt. Twelve counties have census 
figures from 1870. 

Its largest cities are Reno, 32,497; 



NEVADA 



101 



County Map of Nevada 



B 



PERSHING 



CHURCHILL 



fws^ LYON 

DOUGLAS 



( 



ESMERALDA 



WHITE PINE 



t 



102 



THIRD EDITION OF THE HANDY BOOK FOR GENEALOGISTS 



Las Vegas, 24,624; Sparks, 8,203; Elko, 
5,393; North Las Vegas, 3,875. 

Birth and death records from 1887 
to June 30, 1911, marriage records from 
1864 to date, deeds and land records 
from 1864 to date are all in the office 
of the Recorder of each county. 

Birth and death files from July 1, 
1911 to date are at the Nevada State 
Department of Health, Division of Vital 



Statistics, Carson City, Nevada. 

Marriage bans are not filed. 

Wills from 1864 to date are in the 
office of the clerk of each county. 

The records of the state Census of 
1872 are in the custody of the Secretary 
of State, Carson City, Nevada. 

Tax payers lists from 1864 are at the 
office of the Assessor of each county. 

Library — Reno, (Washoe), University 
of Nevada Library. 



Nevada County Histories 

(Population figures to nearest thousand, 1950 Census) 
Census 
Map Date Pop. Reports 

Name Index Formed By M Available Parent County County Seat 

Churchill C2 1861 6 1870-80 Original county Fallon 

Clark F4 1909 48 Lincoln Las Vegas 

Douglas CI 1861 2 1870-80 Original county Minden 

Elko A4 1875 12 1870-80 Lander Elko 

Esmeralda D2 1861 1 1870-80 Original county Godfield 

Eureka B3 1873 1 1880 Lander Eureka 

Humboldt A2 1861 5 1860-80 Original county Winnemucca 

Lander B3 1861 2 1870-80 Original county Austin 

Lincoln D4 1869 4 1870-80 Nye Pioche 

Lyon CI 1861 4 1870-80 Original county Yerington 

Mineral D2 1911 6 Esmeralda Hawthorne 

Nye D3 1864 3 1870-80 Esmeralda Tonopah 

Ormsby CI 1861 4 1870-80 Original county Carson City 

Pershing B2 1919 3 Humboldt Lovelock 

Storey CI 1861 1 1870-80 Original county Virginia City 

Washoe Bl 1861 50 1870-80 Original county Reno 

White Pine C4 1864 9 1870-80 Elko, Lincoln Ely 

U. S. Census Notes: The following discontinued Nevada counties have census 
figures as follows: Carson, 1860, see Utah; Pahute, 1870; Roop, 1870; St. Mary's, 1860, 
see Utah. 



New Hampshire 



Capital, Concord 



New Hampshire, in the northeast 
corner of the United States, is one of 
the thirteen original colonies. Its his- 
tory dates back to 1603 when an English- 
man, Martin Pring anchored in 
Piscataqua harbor. The French explor- 
er, Samuel de Champlain discovered the 
Isles of Shoals in 1605 while sailing along 
the coast of N. H. In 1614 Captain John 
Smith landed on its shores. It was settled 
about 1623 at Rye (Little Harbor), Dover 
and Portsmouth. This was only three 
years after the landing of the Pilgrim 
Fathers in Massachusetts. A little later 
settlements were made at Exeter and 



Hampton. These places were on or near 
the coast, or on a river bank near its 
mouth. After these first settlements, 
little effort was put iorth to establish 
new settlements for almost a hundred 
years. The fear of Indians kept the set- 
tlers from moving inland. 

New Hampshire became part of the 
Massachusetts colony in 1641, and con- 
tinued so, with brief interruptions, for 
about a hundred years. In 1741 it be- 
came a Royal British Province and re- 
mained so until the Revolutionary War. 

A large part of the early settlers 
came from Massachusetts and Connect!- 



NEW HAMPSHIRE 



103 



cut. The Connecticut River is the west- 
ern boundary of the state. Apparently 
it was much easier to go up the river 
than to cut long roads through the for- 
ests from the eastern shore. Many of 
the river towns, as a result, are much 
older than those in the interior. If 
the ancestory of the early settlers of 
one of those towns is sought, it will 
more than likely be found in Connecticut 
or western Massachusetts. 

Of New Hampshire. Archibald F. Ben- 
nett, secretary of the Genealogical So- 
ciety of Utah, has said: "In the great 
migration to the west, New Hampshire 
and Vermont were stopping places for 
a few years for one or more genera- 
tions of families now established far 
from there. Many families from their 
homelands in Massachusetts and Connec- 
ticut seemed to pause here briefly, and 
then resume their westward trek. Their 
residence in New Hampshire was often 
during the pioneer period when records 
were not kept too regularly. Then they 
removed so early that almost all trace 
of their presence in those localities is 
obliterated. Consequently, many ances- 
tral lines of western families are fol- 
lowed back to New Hampshire or Ver- 
mont, and then are hopelessly lost. Yet 
there are actually many sources which 
can assist in the solution of such prob- 
lems." 

During the first two hundred years or 
more of its history, it was mainly people 
from England who came to New Hamp- 
shire. During the next seventy-five years, 
tens of thousands came into the state 
from the Scandinavian countries and 
from Greece, Italy and France. 

New Hampshire entered the union 
in 1788, the ninth state to ratify the 
constitution. 

The 1950 Census gives New Hampshire 
a population of 533,242 residents, which 
places her as the forty-fourth state in 
population, with 57.5 per cent of its res- 
idents being city dwellers and 42.5 per 
cent living in the country. Its largest 
cities are Manchester, 82,732; Nashua, 
34,669; Concord, 27,988; Portsmouth, 
18,300; Berlin 16,615. 

Vital statistics have been kept in the 
towns since 1640, though they are not 
complete. Copies of all statistics re- 
cords since that date have been made. 
They include town records, church re- 
cords, cemetary records, and all other 
available old records. These have all 
been indexed, and may be searched for 



a small fee. These records are available 
at the office of the Registrar of Vital 
Statistics, State House, Concord, N. H., 
and at some of the offices of the town 
clerks. Wills are in the charge of the 
clerks of the probate courts of the ten 
counties. The Registrars of deeds are 
in charge of deeds and land titles. The 
State Library at Concord has charge of 
the Census Records. Cemetery records 
are handled by the cemetery superinten- 
dents or selectmen of the towns. Tax 
payers are handled by the town and 
city clerks throughout the state. 

Almost all towns have town histories. 
Many of these contain much genealogi- 
cal information about the early settlers. 
In the genealogical departments of the 
public libraries will be found many books 
with valuable information about the 
town families. Many records are abail- 
able at the New Hampshire State Li- 
brary and the New Hampshire State Li- 
brary and the New Hampshire Histor- 
ical Society, both in Concord. The Cen- 
sus; reports from 1800 are available, as 
well as those of subsequent years. 

New Hampshire libraries — Concord, 
(Merrimac), Public Library, 45 Green 
St.; New Hampshire Historical Society 
Library, 30 Park St., (local histories of 
state, family and genealogical records, 
old maps, early newspapers); New Hamp- 
shire State Library, 20 Park St.; Man- 
chester, (Hillsboro), City Public Library, 
405 Pine St., (community articles). 

Valuable genealogy records are found 
in the following books which form only 
a small part of the many that have been 
written about this state and its people: 

Sterns, Ezra S.. Genealogy and Family 
History o/ the State o/ New Hampshire. 
4 vol. Pub. 1908 Lewis Publishing Co.. New 
York, Chicago. 

Ayling, Augustus D., Revised Register 
of the Soldiers and Sailors of N. H. in the 
War of Rebellion 1861-1866.. Pub. 1895 by 
the New Hampshire Legislature. 

New Hampshire Towns 
Organized Before 1800 

BELKNAP COUNTY — Alton, 1770; 
Barnstead, 1727; Belmont; Center Har- 
bor, 1797, Gilmanton, 1761; Meredith, 
1748; New Hampton, 1765; Sanbornton, 
1764. 

CARROLL COUNTY — Albany, 1766; 
Bartlett, 1790; Brookfield, 1794; Conway, 
1764; Chatham, 1767; Eaton, 1760; Ef- 
fingham, 1749; Hart's Location, 1773; 
Jackson, 1778; Madison, 1785; Moulton- 
borough, 1763; Ossipee, 1765; Sandwich, 



104 



THIRD EDITION OF THE HANDY BOOK FOR GENEALOGISTS 



1763; Tamworth, 1771; Tuftonboro, 1750; 
Wakefield, 1774; Wolfeboro, 1768. 

CHESHIRE COUNTY — Alstead, 1763; 
Chesterfield, 1761; Dublin, 1752; Fitz- 
william, 1752; Gilsum, 1764; Jaffray, 
1752; Keene, 1754; Marlborough, 1752; 
Marlow, 1753; Nelson, 1767; Rindge, 1754; 
Richmond, 1758; Stoddard, 1769 Sulli- 
van, 1760; Swanzey, 1753; Surry, 1769; 
Walpole, 1749; Westmoreland, 1741; 



Winchester, 1732. 

COOS COUNTY —. Berlin, 1771; Coles- 
brook, 1762; Columbia, 1762; Cambridge, 
1793; Drummer, 1773; Dalton, 1764; Jef- 
ferson, 1765; Lancester, 1763; Milan, 
1771; Northumberland, 1767; Randolph, 
1772; Stark, 1788; Shelburne, 1770; Strat- 
ford, 1775. 

GRAFTON COUNTY — Alexandria, 
1782; Benton, 1764; Bath, 1765; Bethle 



County Map of New Hampshire 




NEW HAMPSHIRE 



105 



hem, 1799; Bridgewater, 1788; Canaan, 
1761; Compton, 1765; Danbury, 1795; 
Dorchester, 1761; Enfield, 1761; Ells- 
worth, 1769; Franconia, 1754; GrafLon, 
1772; Groton, 1761; Hanover, 1765; Hav- 
erhill, 1763; Holderness, 1751; Hebron, 
1792; Landaff, 1764; Lebanon, 1761; Lis- 
bon, 1763; Littleton, 1764; Lyme. 1764: 
Lyman, 1761; Lincoln, 1764; Orange, 
1790; Oxford, 1765; Pierpont, 1768; Ply- 
mouth, 1764; Rumney, 1705; Thornton, 
1770; Warren, 1767; Wentworth, 1766; 
Woodstock, 1763. 

HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY -- Amherst, 
1760; Antrim, 1744; Bedford, 1736; Brook- 
line, 1769; Deering, 1765; Francestov/n, 
1752; Goffstown, 1733; Greenfield, 1771; 
Hancock, 1765; Hillsborough, 1735; Hollis, 
1731; Hudson, 1722; Litchfield, 1720; 
Lyndeborough, 1759; Manchester, 175.1; 
Mason, 1768; Merrimack, 1722; Milford, 
1740; Nashua, 1673; New Boston, 1735; 
New Ipswich, 1735; Petersborough, 1749; 
Pelham, 1745; Sharon, 1791; Temple, 
1750; Weare, 1735; Wilton, 1749; Windsor^ 
1798. 

MERRIMACK COUNTY — Allenstown, 
1747; Andover, 1761; Boscowan, 1760; 
Bow, 1727; Bradford, 1771; Canterbury, 
1723-50; Chichester, 1727; Concord, 1727; 
Dunbarton, 1746, Danbury, 1795; Epsom, 
1727; Henniker, 1760; Hill, 1768; Hop- 
kinton, 1740; Loudon, 1765; Newbury, 



1762; New London, 1758; Northfield, 
1760; Pembroke, 1728; Pittsfield, 1782; 
Salisbury, 1750; Sutton, 1767; Warner, 
1773. 

ROCKINGHAM COUNTY — - Atkinson, 
1728; Auburn, 1734; Brentwood, 1742; 
Candia, 1748; Chester, 1720; Danville, 
1738; Deerfield, 1750; E. Kingston, 1738; 
Epping, 1741; Exeter, 1638; Fremont, 
1764; Greenland, 1704; Hempstead, 1728; 
Hampton, 1635; Hampton Falls, 1726; 
Kensington, 1737; Kingston, 1694; Lon- 
donderry, 1719; Newcastle, 1693; New- 
ington, 1670; Newfields, 1681; Newmar- 
ket, 1727; Newton, 1749; North Hamp- 
ton, 1690; Northwood, 1763; Nottingham, 
1722; Plaistow, 1642; Portsmouth, 1623; 
Raymond, 1764; Rye, 1635; Sandown, 
1756; Seabrook, 1758; South Hampton, 
1742; Stratham, 1629; Windham, 1741. 

STAFFORD COUNTY — Barrington, 
1762; Dover, 1623; Durham, 1623; Farm- 
ington, 1798; Lee, 1766; Madbury, 1755; 
Middleton, 1778; Milton, 1760; New Dur- 
ham, 1749; Rochester, 1722; Somers- 
worth, 1754. 

SULLIVAN COUNTY — Acworth, 1767; 
Charlestown, 1735; Claremont, 1764; 
Cornish, 1765; Croydon, 1766; Goshen, 
1761; Grantham, 1761; Langdon, 1773; 
Lempster, 1785; Newport, 1765-6; Plain- 
field, 1765; Springfield, 1772; Unity, 
1754; Washington, 1768. 



New Hampshire County Histories 

(Population figures to nearest thousand, 1950 Census) 



Name 



Census 
Map Date Pop. Reports 

Index Formed By M Available 



Parent County 



County Seat 



Belknap D2 
Carroll C2 

Cheshire El 
Coos B2 

Grafton* CI 
Hillsboro El 
Merrimack Dl 
Rockingham E2 
Strafford D2 
Sullivan Dl 
*1820 Census 



1842 
1842 
1771 
1803 
1771 



27 
16 
39 
36 

48 



1771 157 
1823 63 
1771 70 
1771 52 
1827 26 
missing. 



1850-80 
1850-80 
1790-80 
1810-80 
1790-80 
1790-80 
1830-80 
1790-80 
1790-80 
1830-80 



Strafford, Merrimac Laconia 

Grafton Ossipee 

Orig. county, Keene 

Grafton Lancaster 

Orig. county Woodsville 

Orig. county Manchester and Nashua 

Rockingham, Hillsboro Concord 

Orig. county Exeter 

Orig. county Dover 

Cheshire Newport 



New Jersey 

Capital, Trenton 

French explorers sailed along the New later the Dutch had settlers opposite 
Jersey coast as early as 1524. In the the present upper New York City. Corn- 
service of Holland, Henry Hudson sailed missioned by their King, Swedish ad- 
up the Hudson River in 1609. Nine years venturers established a colony in the 



106 THIRD EDITION OF THE HANDY BOOK FOR GENEALOGISTS 

Delaware Valley, shortly after the Dutch able in New Jersey as in some other 

came to the area. states. Since they were not required 

With the experience gained in col- by law to keep a record of births and 

onizing southern sections of America, deaths the family Bible was about the 

two English court favorites, Lord Berk- only place where these things were re- 

eley and Sir George Carteret induced corded. And yet, researchers willing 

the Duke of York to grant them the to dig into available records can find 

area between the Hudson and the Dela- a wealth of information, 

ware rivers. They named the colony The office of the State Registrar of 

New Jersey after the English Channel Vital Statistics, State Department of 

home of Carteret. Throwing the terri- Health, Trenton 7, New Jersey, has 

tory open to land-seekers in 1664, the birth records from 1848 to 1929 and 

promoters made tempting offers to death records from 1878 to 1929. Mar- 

those willing to come. To the small riage information from 1848 to 1929 is 

Dutch communities along the Hudson also available there, although some are 

came folks from every section of Brit- incomplete. 

ain. Puritans came down from Connec- Only in Hudson County does the county 

ticut and established Newark. Scotch- clerk issue marriage licenses. In all other 

Irish Presbyterians poured into the east- counties such licenses are handled by 

ern counties, and English Quakers came the town or city clerks, the township as- 

into the fertile regions of the Dela- sessor or the local registrar of vital sta- 

ware. tistics. 

While differing strongly in their re- Early marriage records which were 
ligious convictions, the settlers were sol- kept by the Secretary of State are print- 
idly united against the tax and monetary ed in the Archives. 

ideas of the Crown and the proprietors. Divorce records are kept in the Su- 

Disgusted with the lack of financial perior Court, Chancery Division, at the 

returns in the venture, the proprietors State House in Trenton, 

sold out to William Penn and his Quak- The federal circuit and district courts 

ei- Friends. and the State Supreme court, all in Tren- 

In the intervening years, difficulties ton, and the county circuit courts have 

were erased and more unity ensued. In records of naturalization proceedings, 

the early part of the eighteenth century. Most of the churches in the state have 

New Jersey and New York had the records of their respective memberships 

same royal governor, but this ended in for many years back. 

1738, During the next 49 years New Jer- The originals of wills and probate 

sey had a governor and a legislature matters, together with early guardian- 

of its own. ship and orphans' court proceedings are 

She became the third state to ratify in the custody of the Secretary of State 

the constitution of the United States in in Trenton. Copies of Wills and admin- 

1878. Three years later, the first U. S. istrations of estates beginning in 1804 

Census gave New Jersey a population of are at the county court houses. Wills 

184,139. The majority of these were and administrations of estates from 1682 

English from the Old World as well as to 1805 have been digested and published 

from New England. The Dutch and the in the State Archives. There are ten 

Swedes were also represented by large volumes, each completely indexed. The 

numbers. In the west part of the state state also published an Index of New 

were many French and Scotch. Jersey Wills, three volumes. These wills 

Before William Penn acquired Penn- extend to a much later date than those 

sylvania, he and a company of Quakers given in the Archives. Many libraries, 

settled West Jersey. The early Swedish including the Cache County Library in 

and Dutch settlers continued to live Logan, Utah, have a complete set of 

there. Hence, a New Jersey pedigree the Archives of New Jersey, 

may trace back to the English Quakers, Although thirteen of the twenty-one 

the Puritans from New England, the counties in New Jersey were established 

Swedes who waged war on the early before 1790, no federal census schedules 

English settlers, the Dutch settlers who are available until the 1830 census. All 

came from New Amsterdam (New York) of the New Jersey schedules for 1790, 

and the Huguenots who fled from France 1800, 1810, and 1820 are missing. The 

in search of religious liberty and peace, available schedules are enumerated in 

Research conditions are not so favor- the New Jersey County Histories in this 



NEW JERSEY 



107 



section. 

The New Jersey State Library has 
custody of the state census records taken 
every ten years since 1855. 

More than 275 libraries serve the 
people of New Jersey. Many of these 
have valuable genealogical and histor- 
ical books on their shelves. 

Among the libraries are the following: 

Atlantic City, (Atlantic), Free Public 



Library, Illinois and Pacific Aves., (gene- 
alogical material on N. J., N. Y., and 
Pa., limited number of family histories 
and family Bible recor'ds); Camden, 
(Camden), (across the Delaware River 
from Philadelphia), County Free Pub- 
lic Library; City Public Library; Jersey 
City, (Hudson), (across the river from 
New York City), Free Public Library, 
472 Jersey Ave.; Morristown, (Morris), 



County Map of New Jersey 



B 






D 




108 



THIRD EDITION OF THE HANDY BOOK FOR GENEALOGISTS 



County Free Library, Courthouse, do- braries or book stores: 

cal histories and genealogies) ; City Pub- Barber, John W. Historical Collections 

lie Library, Miller Road and South Street, o/ New Jersey, Past and Present, biogra- 

( family histories and genealogical publi- phies, the State Census of all the towns in 

cations); Newark, (Essex), Public Li- 1865. 543 pp. New Haven, 1868. 

brary, 5 Washington St., (state and lo- Clayton, W. Woodford. History of 

cal history); Genealogical Society of New Union and Middlesex Counties, with biogra- 

Jersey, 33 Lombardy St., (genealogies phies of many pioneers and prominent men. 

and local history); New Brunswick, 885 pp. Philadelphia, 1882. 

(Middlessex), Rutger University Library, Folsom, Joseph S. The Municipalities o[ 

(old newspapers and local histories); Essex County, 1666-1924. Four volumes. 

Paterson, (Passaic), Free Public Li- New York, 1925. 

brary; Princeton, (Mercer), Princeton Hatfield, Edwin F. History of Eliza- 

University Library, (American History, beth, including the Early History of Union 

especially Southern States); Trenton, County. 701 pp. New York, 1868. 

Free Public Library, 120 Academy St.; Lee, Francis B. Genealogical and Per- 

New Jersey State Teachers College Li- sonal Memorial of Mercer County. Two vol- 

brary. umes. New York, 1907. 

Many books have been printed over Stewart, Frank H. Notes on Old Glow 

the years concerning the history of the cester County. 342 pp. Camden. 1917. 

various communities and families of New Wickes, Stephen. History of the Oranges 

Jersey. The following are only a mere in Essex County, from 1666 to 1806. 334 

mention of half a dozen available in li- pp. Newark. 1892. 

New Jersey County Histories 

(Population figures to nearest thousand, 1950 Census) 



Nai 



Census 
Map Date Pop. Reports 

Index Formed By M Available 



Atlantic 


D2 


1837 


132 


1840-80 


Bergen 


A3 


1682 


539 


1830-80 


Burlington 


D2 


1682 


136 


1830-80 


Camden 


D2 


1844 


301 


1850-80 


Cape May 


E2 


1692 


37 


1830-80 


Cumberland 


E2 


1753 


49 


1830-80 


Essex 


B3 


1861-2 


906 


1830-80 


Gloucester 


D2 


1681-2 


92 


1830-80 


Hudson 


E3 


1840 


647 


1840-80 


Hunterdon 


B2 


1692 


43 


1830-80 


Mercer 


C2 


1838 


230 


1840-80 


Middlesex 


B3 


1682 


265 


1830-80 


Monmouth 


C3 


1682 


225 


1830-80 


Morris 


B2 


1738 


164 


1830-80 


Ocean 


C3 


1850 


57 


1850-80 


Passaic 


A3 


1837 


337 


1840-80 


Salem 


Dl 


1681-2 


50 


1830-80 


Somerset 


B2 


1688 


99 


1830-80 


Sussex 


A2 


1753 


34 


1830-80 


Union 


B3 


1857 


398 


1860-80 


Warren 


B2 


1824 


54 


1830-80 



Parent County County Seat 

Burlington Mays Landing 

Original county Hackensack 

Original county Mt. Holly 

Burlington, Glouc Camden 

Cumberland Cape May C. H. 

Salem Bridgeton 

Original county Newark 

Original county Woodbury 

Bergen Jersey City 

Somerset Flemington 

Somerset, Middles Trenton 

Original county ....: New Brunswick 

Original county Freehold 

Hunterdon Morristown 

Monmouth, Burlington Toms River 

Bergen, Essex Paterson 

Original county Salem 

Middlesex Somerville 

Morris Newton 

Essex, Middles Elizabeth 

Sussex, Hunterdon Belvidere 

Northern N. J. 



New Mexico 



Capital, Sante Fe 

Until 1821 when the 780-mile Santa or Europeans had made their homes in 
Fe Trail was opened from Independence, New Mexico. For years, the region had 
Mo., to Santa Fe, N. M., few Americans belonged to Mexico and was inhabited 



NEW MEXICO 



109 



mainly by Indians and Spanish-Ameri- 
cans. Its main city, Santa Fe, had been 
the capital of the Mexican territory 
since 1609. At that early date and for 
the next 150 years or more, its con- 
nections were more with Mexico than 
the United States. Indians and Spanish- 
Americans were its only inhabitants un- 
til the first part of 1800. 

Its present 681,187 population consists 
of about 34,000 Indians, 227,000 Spanish 
Americans, and 420,000 from the United 
States and Europe. The latter are main- 
ly from Italy, Germany, England and 
Greece. 

New Mexcio became part of the Unit- 
ed States in 1848. In 1850 when it was 
created a territory, it included most of 
its present domain, plus Arizona and 
Colorado. The Gadsden Purchase in 
1854 included within its boundaries the 
Gila Valley in Catron and Grant count- 
ies 

The Colorado section was taken from 
New Mexico in 1861 and made into a 
separate territory. Two years later, Ari- 
zona was also withdrawn and created 
into a separate territory. 

After operating for 62 years under 
territorial laws. New Mexico became a 
state in 1912, when it was made the 
forty-seventh state in the union. 

New Mexico has thirty-two counties. 



In eleven counties, formed between 1852 
and 1869, the U. S. Census schedules 
are available. 

Birth and death records from 1919 
are at the office of the State Health 
Department, Santa Fe, N. M. They are 
not complete. 

The County Clerk in each county seat 
has marriage records, wills, property 
deeds, and administration of estates. 

Land grants are at the office of the 
State Land Office in Santa Fe, N. M. 

Tax payers lists are at the office of 
the County Assessors, war service re- 
cords at the office of the Adjutant Gen- 
eral, cemetery records with the cemetery 
boards, and guardianship proceedings 
with the district courts. 

Valuable genealogical information is 
contained in hundreds of volumes in the 
Stephen Watts Kearney Chapter of the 
Daughters of the American Revolution 
in Santa Fe and the New Mexico His- 
torical Society, Santa Fe, New Mexico. 
Other libraries in the larger cities have 
also much genealogical information. Al- 
buquerque, (Bernalillo), Public Library, 
423 E. Central Ave., (Southwest lore); 
University of New Mexico Library, (Mex- 
ican and South American publications 
and history. Southwest lore); Santa Fe, 
(Santa Fe), Nwe Mexico State Library 
Commission, 301 Don Caspar, (South- 
western lore). 



New Mexico County Histories 

(Population figures to nearest thousand, 1950 Census) 



Name 



Census 
Map Date Pop. Reports 

Index Formed By M Available 

1850-80 



1870-80 



Bernalillo 


B2 


1852 


146 


Catron 


CI 


1921 


4 


Chaves 


C3 


1887 


41 


Colfax 


A3 


1869 


17 


Curry 


B4 


1909 


23 


De Baca 


C3 


1917 


3 


Dona Ana 


D2 


1852 


40 


Eddy 


D4 


1887 


41 


Grant 


Dl 


1868 


22 


Guadalupe 


B3 


1905 


7 


Harding 


A4 


1921 


3 


Hidalgo 


Dl 


1920 


5 


Lea 


D4 


1917 


31 


Lincoln 


C3 


1880 


7 


Los Alamos 


B2 


1949 


10 


Luna 


D2 


1901 


9 


McKinley 


Bl 


1899 


27 


Mora 


A3 


1859 


9 


Otero 


D3 


1899 


15 



1860-80 



1870-80 



1860-80 



Parent County County Seat 

Original county Albuquerque 

Socorro Reserve 

Lincoln Roswell 

Mora Raton 

Quay, Roosevelt Clovis 

Chaves, Guadalupe, 

Roosevelt Fort Sumner 

Original county Las Cruces 

Lincoln Carlsbad 

Socorro Silver City 

Lincoln, San Miguel Santa Rosa 

Mora, Union Mosquero 

Grant Lordsburg 

Chaves, Eddy Lovington 

Socorro Carrizozo 

Sandoval, Santa Fe Los Alamos 

Dona Ana, Grant Deming 

Bernalillo, Valencia, San Juan .... Gallup 

San Miguel Mora 

Dona Ana, Lincoln, Socorro .. Alamogordo 



110 



THIRD EDITION OF THE HANDY BOOK FOR GENEALOGISTS 











Census 




Map 


Date 


Pop. 


Reports 


Name 


Index 


Formed By M 


Available 


Quay 


B4 


1903 


14 




Rio Arriba 


A2 


1852 


25 


1850-80 


Roosevelt 


C4 


1903 


16 




Sandoval 


B2 


1903 


12 




San Juan 


Al 


1887 


18 




San Miguel 


B3 


1852 


27 


1850-80 


Santa Fe 


B3 


1852 


38 


1860-80 


Sierra 


C2 


1884 


7 




Socorro 


02 


1852 


10 


1860-80 


Taos 


A3 


1852 


17 


1850-80 


Torrance 


B3 


1903 


8 




Union 


A4 


1895 


7 




Valencia 


Bl 


1852 


22 


1850-80 



Parent County 



County Seat 



Chaves Tucumcari 

Original county Tierra Amarilla 

Chaves Portales 

Rio Arriba Bernalillo 

Rio Arriba Aztec 

Original county Las Vegas 

Original county Santa Fe 

Socorro Hot Springs 

Original county Socorro 

Original county Taos 

Lincoln, San Miguel, 

Socorro, Santa Fe Estancia 

Colfax, Mora, San Miguel Clayton 

Original county Los Lunas 



U. S. Census reports for discontinued counties: Arizona, 1860; Santa Ana, 1850-70. 



County Map of New Mexico 



RIO ARRIBA 



B 



LOS ALAMOS 




CX3NA ANA 



New York 

Capital, Albany 

The Dutch settled New York in 1624 mainly built up on the southern end of 

when they established a colony at Al- the- Manhattan Island, there were 60,000 

bany, then called Fort Orange. The next persons in the city; in 1830 there were 

year other settlers from Holland came 200,000, of which 80,000 had arrived in 

to New York City, then New Amster- the previous ten years; by 1860 it had 

dam. Previously, at least two explorers, increased four-fold, and numbered 807,- 

Hudson and Champlain, had looked over 000; in 1900, almost 3,500,000. 

the territory. New York is described as a land of 

In the next few years the Dutch in- many tongues, not less than sixty lang- 

duced individuals from Scandinavia, uages being heard. The predominating 

Great Britain, and Germany to come nationalities are Italian, Russian, Ger- 

with them to the New World. man, Polish, Irish, Austrian, English, 

Many Puritan families in Massachu- Hungarian, Swedish, Norwegian, Czech, 

setts and Connecticut drifted south into Greek, French, Finish and Danish. 

New York around 1640. Some sixty The researcher interested in New 

years later German families came into York records should first of all, before 

the Mohawk Valley looking for places undertaking any search whatsoever, 

in which to build their homes. About spend a day or two or more carefully 

the same time French settlers were reading Rosalie Fellows Bailey's "Guide 

straggling into the new section from to Genealogical Sources for New York 

Canada. Other French families, together City, 1783-1898." The Guide "is in its 

with some Spaniards and Portuguese, field one of the most important, perhaps 

disturbed by the uprisings in the West the most important, in the United 

Indies, where they had been for some States." This most worthy appraisal 

time, sought refuge in New York. comes from one of the foremost present- 

The total population of the colony in day genealogists, an individual who ha.s 

1740 was established at only 50,000. About devoted much thought and energy to the 

that time many former Connecticut science of genealogy. Carefully adhear- 

dwellers went across the sound and ing to Miss Bailey's suggestions in her 

settled in Long Island. Others came in- valuable treatise "will give reasonable 

to Dutchess, Westchester and Orange hope that any problem within its limit of 

counties. A population check previous to time and place may be solved." 

the outbreak of the Revolutionary War Births, Deaths, and Marriages, from 

would find settlers on Long Island, on 1880 to present, for the entire state 

the banks of the Hudson River, a few exclusive of all New York City records 

Palatine Germans along the Mohav/k and certain records of Albany, Buffalo 

River and some New Englanders in the and Yonkers, noted below, are in the 

extreme south-eastern part of the state, charge of the Director, Office of Vital 

In 1776 New York broke with the Statistics, State Department of Health, 

Mother Country, and joined the other Alfred E. Smith State Office Building, 

colonies in their fight for freedom. This Albany. The records of Albany, Buffalo 

struggle continued until 1781. Seven and Yonkers not on file in the Health 

years later New York became the elev- Department but available in the regis- 

enth state in the Union by ratifying the trars' office of the cities concerned are: 

constitution. Births and deaths prior to Jan. 1, 1914; 

The New York state census reports marriages prior to Jan. 1, 1908. The 
show these populations: in 1790 340,120 central office for New York City vital 
(surpassed by Virginia, Pennsylvania, records is Board of Health, 125 Worth 
North Carolina and Massachusetts); in Street, New York City. For data on 
1800, 589,051 (surpassed by Virginia and records prior to 1880, when the Depart- 
Pennsylvania); in 1810, 959,049 (sur- ment of Health became the central de- 
passed only by Virginia);^ in 1820, pository for the state, see Historical 
1,049,458 (surpassed by none); in 1830, records .survey. New York State, "Guide 
1,918,608; in 1840. 2,428,921; in 1850, to Public Vital Statistics in New York 
3,097,394; in 1860, 3,880.735. State," 1942, 3v. wherein the status of 

In 1800 when New York City was the vital records of each community is 

111 



112 THIRD EDITION OF THE HANDY BOOK FOR GENEALOGISTS 

given. Slate and Federal Census Records," 
Marriage Bonds, from 1752 to 1784, 1942, showing the available schedules 
originally 40v., are in charge of Asso- from each county. From one to 14 dif- 
ciate Librarian, Manuscripts and History ferent schedules are on hand at the 
Section, New York State Library, Al- office of the County Clerk of each 
bany. These and other licenses, some county. In addition to those noted 
as early as, 1641 which are contained therein, the Manuscripts and History 
in other series filed in the State Library, Section, New York State Library has 
are indexed in Secretary of State, microfilm of the 1800, 1810, and 1830 
"Names of Persons for Whom Marriage P'ederal Censuses for New York State. 
Licenses were Issued by the Secretary Originals are on file in the National 
of the Province of New York Previous Archives, Washington, D. C. 
to 1784." 1860. See also "Supplemen- Tax Payers Lists — The New York 
tary List of Marriage Licenses," (State State Library, Manuscripts and History 
Library Bulletin, History No. 1, April Section, Albany, has some assessment 
1898) for list of bonds for years 1752- rolls in its collections, both public and 
53, 1755-56, and 1758, formerly bound private. No inventory of them is avail- 
as V.41 of Marriage Bonds. able. 

Wills — usually in county surrogates' Local divisions of government — county, 

office. For other wills see Berthold town, etc. — frequently have such re- 

Fernow ed., "Calendar of Wills on File cords on file. 

and Recorded in the Offices of the Clerk Church or Parish Records Transferred 
of the Court of Appeals, of the County to State — In the custody of the Associ- 
Clerk at Albany, and of the Secretary ate Librarian, Manuscripts and History 
of State, 1626-1836," 1896. For abstracts Section, New York State Library, Al- 
of wills on file in the Surrogate's of- bany, is a large collection of church re- 
fice, City of New York, 1665-1800, see cords, originals and copies. See Histor- 
New York Historical Society, "Collec- ical Records Survey, New York State, 
tions." v.25-41. Included therein are "Guide to Vital Statistics Records of 
wills for the southern district of New Churches in New York State," 1942 2v. 
York State, for information concerning those on 
In the Manuscripts and History Sec- file in the State Library and elsewhere, 
ticn, New York State Library are wills. War Service Records — Colonial and 
1823-1940, of non-resident property Revolutionary war service records for 
owners. New York State are in the custody of 
Deeds and Land Grants — deeds are the Associate Librarian, Manuscripts and 
usually on file in the county clerk's History Section, New York State Li- 
offices, brary, Albany. War of 1812, 1860-65, 
The following are state records: Spanish-American, World War I and 
Patents, land papers, deeds 1630-64 World War II records for this state 
(Dutch) in New York Colonial Manu- are in the office of the Adjutant Gen- 
scripts, v.GG and HH in custody of Asso- eral. Bureau of War Records, 112 State 
ciate Librarian, Manuscripts and His- Street, Albany. 

tory Section, New York State Library, Cemetery Records — The Manuscripts 
Albany. and History Section, New York State 
New York Colonial Manuscripts in- Library, Albany, has a large collection 
dorsed Land Papers, 1643-1803. Same of New York State cemetery records, 
custody as preceding. Guardianship and Orphan Court Pro- 
Deeds, including mortgages and re- ceedings — In custody of county surro- 
leases to state, 1642 to present, in cus- gate's offices. 

tody of Secretary, Land Board, Depart- New York Libraries — Albany, (Albany), 

ment of State, 164 State Street, Albany. New York State Library (state and local 

Letters — Patent of Lands, 1664-1878. histories and genealogy). Binghampton, 

Custody same as preceding. (Broome), Public Library, 78 Exchange 

Census Records — All schedules of the St. Brooklyn, (Kings), Public Library, 

Federal Census from 1790 to and in- Grand Army Plaza, (Civil War Records) ; 

eluding 1940 are at Bureau of the Cen- Long Island Historical Society, Library, 

sus, Washington, D. C. 128 Pierrepont St. (local and personal 

From the State Librarian, New York histories); St. Johns University Library, 

State Library, Albany, N. Y., may be 75 Lewis Ave. (Irish History). Buffalo, 

obtained "An Inventory of New York (Erie), Public Library, 120 W. Eagle St.; 



NEW YORK 



113 



The Grosvenor Library, Edward and 
Franklin Sts., (genealogy and local his- 
tory). Cooperstown, (Otsego), New York 
State Association Library, (community 
and personal histories). Ithaca, (Tomp- 
kins), Cornell University Library, (col- 
lections on Iceland, history of the states, 
Civil War). New York City, (N. Y.), 
American Irish Historical Society Li- 
brary, 991 Fifth Ave., (Irish in colonial 
America and later, genealogy, personal 
histories); Columbia University Librar- 
ies, 535 W. 114th St., School of Journa- 
lism, (newspaper files); Editor and Pub- 
lisher Library, 1475 Broadway, (news- 
paper files); Fordham University, Duane 
Library, (early American collections); 
The Holland Society of New York Li- 
brary, 90 West St., (genealogical collec- 
tions) ; National Lutheran Council Li- 
brary, 50 Madison Ave., (history of Lu- 
theran Church in America); New York 
Genealogical and Biographical Society 
Library, 122 E. 58th St.; New York Her- 
ald Tribune Library, 230 W. 41st. St. 
(newspaper collection); The New York 
Historical Society Library, 170 Central 
Park West, (genealogy, newspapers, lo- 
cal histories of N. Y.); The New York 
Public Library, fifth Ave. and 42nd St., 
(Irish History, Local History, British and 
American genealogies, manuscript per- 
sonal histories); New York Times Li- 
brary, 229 W. 43rd St., (more than a mil- 
lian biographical files) ; Sons of the Rev- 
olution Library, 54 Pearl St.; James T. 
White & Co. Library, 101 Fifth Ave., 
(state, county and personal histories) 
Rochester, (Monroe), Public Library, 
115 South Ave., (Rochester Historical 
Society collection); University of Ro- 
chester Library, (Western New York 
hi.story collection). Syracuse, (Onondaga). 
Public Library, 335 Montgomery Street, 
(local histories and genealogies). 



Thousands upon thousands of volumes 
have been written about New York people 
and communities and every library in 
the nation have some of them on its 
shelves. Just to make a mere mention, 
consider these, some of whch are very 
valuable: 

Barber, John W. and Howe, Henry. 
Historical Collections o/ the State of New 
York. 608 pp. New York. 1841. 

Census o[ New York, 1790, First Federal 
Census. 308 pp. Washington, D. C, 1908. 

New York Genealogical and Biographical 
Record, a quarterly magazine. Eighty seven 
volumes. 1870-1956. 

New York Historical Society Collections. 
Sixty six volumes. 1868-1923. 

O'Callaghan, E. B. The Documentary 
History o[ the State of New York. Vol. I, 
536 pp. A roll of names and surnames of 
1689; N.Y. Army List of 1700; 1702. 1714 
and 1720 Census of Orange, Dutches and 
Albany counties; 1703 Census of N. Y. City; 
inhabitants of Hempstead in 1673; roll of 
those taking oath of allegiance in N. Y. in 
1687; inhabitants in 1698. Vol. II. 1676 As- 
sessment Rolls; 711 pp.. Vol. III. Early 
Immigrants to New Netherlands, 1657- 
1664. and where they came from; restora- 
tion of N. Y. to the English; state of re- 
ligion in province; names of some resi- 
dents in 1737; papers relating to the Pala- 
tines and the first settlement of Newburgh, 
Orange Co.; Ulster County Freeholders in 
1728; Quakers and Moravians; state of 
Anglo-American Church. 748 pp. Vol 4, 
Journal of New Netherland. 1647; a descrip- 
tion of New Netherland in 1644; 1663 massa- 
cre of Wildwyck, now Kingston; assessment 
rolls of the five Dutch towns of Kings 
Co.. L. I. in 1675; census of Flat Bush. 
Flatt Lands, Gravesend. New Utrecht. 
Brockland, Bushwyck, Suffolk County, 
Dutchess County, and soldier lists, all of 
1738; 674 pp. Weed. Parsons and Company, 
Albany, N. Y.. 1850. 



New York County Histories 

(Population figures to nearest thousand, 1950 Census] 



\ 











Census 




Map 


Date 


Pop. 


Reports 


Name 


Index 


Formed 


By M 


Available 


Albany 


B3 


1683 


239 


1790-80 


Allegany 


D2 


1806 


44 


1810-80 


Bronx 


B4 


1914 


1451 




Broome 


C3 


1806 


185 


1810-80 


Cattaraugus E2 


1808 


78 


1810-80 


Cayuga 


C2 


1799 


70 


1800-80 


Chautauqua 


E2 


1808 


135 


1810-80 


Chemung 


D2 


1836 


87 


1840-80 



Parent County County Seat 

Original county Albany 

Genessee Belmont 

New York Bronx 

Tioga Binghamton 

Genesee Little Vallley 

Onondaga Auburn 

Genesee Mayville 

Tioga Elmira 



114 



THIRD EDITION OF THE HANDY BOOK FOR GENEALOGISTS 



Census 

Map Date Pop. Reports 

Name Index Formed By M Available Parent County County Seat 

Chenango C2 1798 39 1800-80 Herkimer Norwich 

Clinton Al 1788 54 1790-80 Washington Plattsburg 

Columbia B3 1786 43 1790-80 Albany Hudson 

Cortland C2 1808 32 1820-80 Onondaga Cortland 

Delaware B3 1797 44 1800-80 Luster .Otsego Delhi 

Dutchess B3 1683 137 1790-SO Original county Poughkeepsie 

Erie D2 1821 899 1830-80 Niagara Buffalo 




NEW YORK 



115 



Census 

Map Date Pop. Reports 

Name Index Formed By M Available Parent County County Seat 

Essex A2 1199 35 1800-80 Clinton Elizabethtown 

Franklin Al 1808 45 1810-80 Clinton Malone 

Fulton B2 1838 51 1840-80 Montgomery Johnstown 

Genesee Dl 1802 48 1810-80 Ontario Batavia 

Greene B3 1800 29 1800-80 Ulster, Albany Catskill 

Hamilton B2 1816 4 1820-80 Montgomery Lake Pleasant 

Herkimer B2 1791 61 1800-80 Montgomery Herkimer 

Jefferson Bl 1805 86 1810-80 Oneida Watertown 

Kings B4 1683 2738 1790-80 Original county Brooklyn 

Lewis Bl 1806 23 1810-80 Oneida Lowville 

Livingston D2 1821 40 1830-80 Genesee, Ontario Geneseo 

Madison C2 1806 46 1810-80 Chenango Wampsville 

Monroe Dl 1821 488 1830-80 Genesee Rochester 

Montgomery B2 1772 60 1790-80 Albany Fonda 

Nassau B4 1899 673 Queens Mineola 

New York B4 1683 1960 1790-80 Original county New York 

Niagra Dl 1808 190 1810-80 Genesee Lockport 

Oneida B2 1798 223 1800-80 Herkimer Utica, Rome 

Onondaga C2 1798 342 1800-80 Herkimer Syracuse 

Ontario D2 1789 60 1790-80 Montgomery Canandaigua 

Orange B4 1683 152 1790-80 Original county Goshen 

Orleans Dl 1824 30 1830-80 Genesee Albion 

Oswego C2 1816 77 1820-80 Oneida Oswego, Pulaski 

Otsego B2 1791 51 1800-80 Montgomery Cooperstown 

Putnam B4 1812 20 1820-80 Dutchess Carmel 

Queens B4 1551 1800-80 New York Jamaica 

Rensselaer A3 1791 133 1800-80 Albany Troy 

Richmond B4 1683 192 1790-80 Original county St. George 

Rockland B4 1798 89 1800-80 Orange New City 

St. Lawrence Bl 1802 99 1810-80 Clinton Canton 

Saratoga A2 1791 75 1800-80 Albany Ballston Spa 

Schenectady B2 1809 142 1810-80 Albany Schenectady 

Schoharie B3 1795 23 1800-80 Albany, Ostego Schoharie 

Schuyler D2 1859 14 1860-80 Tompkins, Steuben. 

Ostego, Chenango Watkins Glen 

Seneca C2 1804 29 1810-80 Cayuga Ovid, Waterloo 

Steuben D2 1796 91 1800-80 Ontario Bath 

Suffolk B4 1685 276 1790-80 Original county Riverhead 

Sullivan B3 1809 41 1810-80 Ulster Monticello 

Tioga C3 1791 30 1800-80 Montgomery Owego 

Tompkins C2 1817 59 1820-80 Cayuga, Seneca Ithaca 

Ulster B3 1683 93 1790-80 Original county Kingston 

Warren A2 1813 39 1820-80 Washington Lake George 

Washington A2 1772 47 1790-80 Albany Hudson Falls 

Wayne C2 1827 57 1830-80 Ontario, Seneca Lyons 

Westchester B4 1683 626 1790-80 Original county White Plains 

Wyoming D2 1841 33 1850-80 Genesee Warsaw 

Yates D2 1823 18 1830-80 Ontario Penn Yan 

U. S. Census Notes — The 1810 schedules of Cattaraugus and Chautauques 
counties are included with those of Niagara, vol. 4, all of the schedules for Erie 

county include those of the city of Buffalo; all Kings County schedules include 
city of Brooklyn; all New York County schedules include those of the city of New 

York; the 1870 census for New York's 22 wards contains an original enumeration 
and re-enumeration. 



North Carolina 



Capital, Raleigh 

The first permanent settlement in "banns" published or announced from 

North Carolina territory was established the pulpit or they could buy a license. 

^___ ^ - ,^, Those married by license had to furnish 

in 1653 when groups of settlers came .... a -u a rj.. ^A 

^ ^ a fifty pound bond. Those old marriage 

south from Virginia to occupy the sec- bo^ds. many of which are still in the 
tion north of the Albemarle Sound. The county court houses, are full of gen- 
influx of new settlers was so limited that ealogical information. In the parish reg- 
in an eighty year period the population isters kept by the priests were re- 
had increased only to about 14,000. cords of births, deaths and marriages. 

For several years prior to the Revo- Some of the old parish records are in 
lution. Highland Scotch immigrants were the office of the State Historical Corn- 
arriving frequently in the North Caro- mission, though some are still in the 
lina section. Most of them established offices of the County Clerk or the Coun- 
themselves in the southeast section. So ty Register of Deeds. 

rapidly did they arrive that in a few The National Archives have the Cen- 

years there were more than 20,000 of sus schedules for all of the North Caro- 

them in that territory. lina counties. Almost half of the hun- 

When large groups of Scotch-Irish de- dred counties were represented in the 
parted from Pennsylvania down the Shen- 1790 Federal Census, 
andoah Valley to settle in Virginia, many North Carolina libraries — Charlotte, 
continued on into North Carolina. For (Mecklenburg), Public Library 310 N. 
religious reasons they had been banished Tryon St.; Durham, (Durham), Duke 
from Scotland, where their strong Pro- University Library, (Southern history, 
testant views irked the religious leaders, lore, and newspapers); Raleigh, (Wake), 
Thousands of them were transplanted in- North Carolina State Library, Morgan 
to Ireland, where they remained long St., (South history and genealogy) ; Win- 
enough to get an opportunity to come to ston-Salem, (Forsyth). Carnegie Public 
the New World. Many of them estab- Library, 
lished homes in the western section of the Books on North Carolina: 
state, around the present region of Ire- Allen, W. C. The Annals o/ Haywood 
dell County. County, N. C, historical, sociological, bi- 

Many Germans came into North Caro- ographical. and genealogical. 632 pp. 1935. 

lina in the early days. In 1760 there Crittenden, Charles Christopher and 

were about 15,000 in Forsyth and Guil- Lacy, Dan. The Historical Records o[ North 

ford counties. A colony of English speak- Carolina. Vol. I. 491 pp. County Records of 

ing Quakers from Virginia, Pennsyl- Alamance through Columbus Counties. Vol. 

vania, and Nantucket, Mass., settled in II. 568 pp. Craven through Moore Counties. 

Rockingham, Guilford, and Chatham Vol III. 760 pp. Nash through Yancey Coun- 

counties. Disliking slavery, they later ties. North Carolina Historical Commission, 

moved to Ohio and Indiana. However, Raleigh. 1939. 

some of them remained and their de- Griffen, Clarence W. History ot Old 

scendants are still in North Carolina. Tryon and Rutherford Counties, N. C, 1730- 

Before the Revolution, the Church of 1936. 640 pp. The Miller Printing Co., Ashe- 
England was in "power" in North Caro- ville. N. C. 1937. 

lina as in Virginia. Only the ordained Grimes, J. Bryan. North Carolina Wills 

ministers of that church were permitted and Inventories, 587 pp. Abstract of Wills, 

to perform marriage ceremonies. Those 1690-1760. 670 pp. Edwards 6 Broughton 

who wished to marry could have their Printing Co.. Raleigh. 1912. 

North Carolina County Histories 

(Population figures to nearest thousand. 1950 Census) 

Census 
Map Date Pop. Reports 

Name Index Formed By Iv! Available Parent County County Seat 

Alamance Dl 1849 71 1850-80 Orange Graham 

Albemarle Al 1663 1 of 3 original cos. discontinued in 1751 

116 



NORTH CAROLINA 



117 





Map 


Date 


Pop. 


Census 
Reports 


Name 


Index 


Formed 


By M 


Available 


Alexander 


El 


1847 


15 


1850-80 


Alleghany 


El 


1859 


8 


1860-80 


Anson 


D2 


1750 


27 


1790-80 


Ashe 


El 


1799 


22 


1800-80 


Avery 


C3 


1911 


13 




Bath 




1696 






Beaufort 


B2 


1712 


37 


1790-80 


Bertie 


Bl 


1722 


26 


1790-80 


Bladen 


C3 


1734 


30 


1790-80 


Brunswick 


C3 


1764 


19 


1790-80 


Buncombe 


D4 


1791 


124 


1800-80 


Burke 


C4 


1777 


46 


1790-80 


Bute 




1764 






Cabarrus 


E2 


1792 


64 


1800-80 


Caldwell 


El 


1841 


43 


1850-80 


Camden 


Al 


1777 


5 


1790-80 


Cartaret 


B2 


1722 


23 


1790-80 


Caswell 


Dl 


1777 


21 


1800-80 


Catawba 


E2 


1842 


62 


1850-80 


Chatham 


D2 


1771 


25 


1790-80 


Cherokee 


E4 


1839 


18 


1840-80 


Chowan 


Bl 


1670 


13 


1790-80 


Clay 


E4 


1861 


6 


1870-80 


Cleveland 


E2 


1841 


64 


1850-80 


Columbus 


C3 


1808 


61 


1810-80 


Craven 


B2 


1712 


49 


*1790-80 


Cumberlanc 


C2 


1754 


96 


1790-80 


Currituck 


Al 


1670 


6 


**1790-S0 


Dare 


Al 


1870 


5 


1870-80 


Davidson 


Dl 


1822 


62 


1830-80 


Davie 


El 


1836 


15 


1840-80 


Dobbs 




1758 






Duplin 


B2 


1750 


41 


1790-80 


Durham 


CI 


1881 


102 




Edgecombe 


Bl 


1741 


52 


1790-80 


Forsyth 


Dl 


1849 


146 


1850-80 


Franklin 


CI 


1779 


31 


**1800-80 


Gaston 


E2 


1846 


111 


1850-80 


Gates 


Bl 


1779 


10 


1800-80 


Glasgow 




1791 






Graham 


E4 


1872 


7 


1800 


Granville 


CI 


1746 


32 


1800-80 


Greene 


B2 


1791 


18 


* 1800-80 


Guilford 


Dl 


1771 


191 


1790-80 


Halifax 


Bl 


1758 


58 


1790-80 


Harnett 


C2 


1855 


48 


1860-80 


Haywood 


D4 


1808 


38 


1810-80 


Henderson 


D4 


1838 


31 


1840-80 


Hertford 


Bl 


1759 


21 


1790-80 


Hoke 


C2 


1911 


16 




Hyde 


A2 


1712 


6 


1790-80 


Iredell 


El 


1788 


56 


1790-80 


Jackson 


D4 


1851 


19 


1860-80 


Johnston 


C2 


1746 


66 


1790-80 


Jones 


B2 


1778 


11 


1790-80 


Lee 


C2 


1907 


24 




Lenoir 


B2 


1791 


46 


1800-80 


Lincoln 


E2 


1779 


27 


1790-80 


Macon 


E4 


1728 


16 


1830-80 



Parent County County Seat 

Iredell, Caldwell & Wilkes .... Taylorsville 

Ashe Sparta 

Bladen Wadesboro 

Wilkes Jefferson 

Caldwell, Mitchell & Watauga .... Newland 
Discontinued in 1739 

Bath Washington 

Chowan, Bath Windsor 

New Hanover, Bath Elizabethtown 

New Hanover, Bladen Southport 

Burke, Rutherford Asheville 

Rowan Morganton 

AJpl. 1779 

Mecklenburg Concord 

Burke, Wilkes Lenoir 

Pasquotank Camden 

Bath Beaufort 

Orange Yanceyville 

Lincoln Newton 

Orange Pittsboro 

Macon Murphy 

Prec. Albemarle Edenton 

Cherokee Hayesville 

Rutherford, Lincoln Shelby 

Bladen, Brunswick Whiteville 

Prec. Bath Co New Bern 

Bladen Fayetteville 

Albemarle Currituck 

Currituck, Tyrell Manteo 

Rowan Lexington 

Rowan Mocksville 

Johnston, abol. 1791 

New Hanover Kenansville 

Orange, Wake Durham 

Bertie Tarboro 

Stokes Winston-Salem 

Bute Louisburg 

Lincoln Gastonia 

Chowan, Hertford Gatesville 

Discontinued 1799 

Cherokee Robbinsville 

Edgecombe, Orig. Glasgow Oxford 

Dobbs Snow Hill 

Rowan, Orange Greensboro 

Edgecombe Halifax 

Cumberland Lillington 

Buncombe Waynesville 

Buncombe Hendersonville 

Bertie, Chowan, Northampton .... Winton 

Cumberland, Robeson Raeford 

Wickham, Pres. 

Bath County Swanquarter 

Rowan Statesville 

Haywood, Macon Sylva 

Craven Smithfield 

Craven Trenton 

Chatham, Harnett, Moore Sanford 

Dobbs Kinston 

Tyron Lincolnton 

Haywood Franklin 



118 



THIRD EDITION OF THE HANDY BOOK FOR GENEALOGISTS 



Census 
Map Date Pop. Reports 

Name Index Formed By M Available Parent County County Seat 

Madison D4 1851 21 1860-80 Buncombe, Yancey Marshall 

Martin Bl 1774 28 1790-80 Halifax, Tyrell Williamston 

McDowell D4 1842 26 1850-80 Burke, Rutherford Marion 

Mecklenburg E2 1762 197 1790-80 Anson Charlotte 

Mitchell D4 1861 15 1870-80 Burke, Caldwell, 

McDowell, Watauga Bakersville 




NORTH CAROLINA 



119 



Name 



Census 
Map Date Pop. Reports 

Index Formed By M Available 



Montgomery D2 


1779 


17 


**1790-80 


Moore 


D2 


1784 


33 


1790-80 


Nash 


CI 


1777 


60 


1790-80 


New Hanover B3 


1729 


63 


*1790-80 


Northampton Bl 


1741 


28 


1790-80 


Onslow 


B2 


1734 


42 


1790-80 


Orange 


CI 


1752 


34 


1800-80 


Pamlico 


B2 


1872 


10 


1880 


Pasquotank 


Al 


1670 


24 


1790-80 


Pender 


B3 


1875 


18 


1880 


Perquimans 


Al 


1670 


10 


1790-80 


Person 


CI 


1791 


24 


1800-80 


Pitt 


B2 


1760 


64 


1790-80 


Polk 


D4 


1855 


12 


1860-80 


Randolph 


C2 


1779 


51 


** 1790-80 


Richmond 


D2 


1779 


40 


1790-80 


Robeson 


C3 


1787 


88 


1790-80 


Rockingham Dl 


1785 


65 


1790-80 


Rowan 


E2 


1753 


75 


1790-80 


Rutherford 


D4 


1779 


75 


1790-80 


Sampson 


D2 


1784 


50 


1790-80 


Scotland 


D2 


1899 


26 




Stanly 


D2 


1841 


37 


1850-80 


Stokes 


Dl 


1789 


22 


1790-80 


Surry 


El 


1771 


46 


1790-80 


Swain 


E4 


1871 


10 


1880 


Transylvania D4 


1861 


15 


1870-80 


Tyrrell 


Al 


1729 


5 


1790-80 


Union 


E2 


1842 


42 


1850-80 


Vance 


CI 


1881 


32 




Wake* 


CI 


1771 


136 


** 1790-80 


Warren 


CI 


1779 


24 


1790-80 


Washington 


Bl 


1799 


13 


1800-80 


Watauga 


El 


1849 


18 


1850-80 


Wayne 


C2 


1779 


64 


1790-80 


Wilkes 


El 


1777 


45 


1790-80 


Wilson 


B2 


1855 


55 


1860-80 



Yadkin El 1850 22 1860-80 

Yancey D4 1833 16 1840-80 

*1810 Census schedule missing. 

**1820 Census schedule missing. 



Parent County County Seat 

Anson Troy 

Cumberland Carthage 

Edgecombe Nashville 

Preceding Bath Wilmington 

Bertie Jackson 

Preceding Bath Jacksonville 

Bladen, Granville Hillsboro 

Beaufort, Craven Bayboro 

Prec. Albemarle Elizabeth City 

New Hanover Burgaw 

Prec. Albemarle Hertford 

Caswell Roxboro 

Beaufort Greenville 

Henderson, Rutherford Columbus 

Guilford Asheboro 

Anson Rockingham 

Bladen Lumberton 

Guilford Wentworth 

Anson Salisbury 

Burke, Tyron Rutherfordton 

Duplin, New Hanover Clinton 

Richmond Laurinburg 

Montgomery Albemarle 

Surry Danbury 

Rowan Dobson 

Jackson, Macon Bryson City 

Henderson, Jackson Brevard 

Prec. Albemarle Columbia 

Anson Mecklenburg Monroe 

Franklin, Granville, Warren .... Henderson 
Cumberland, Johnston, Orange .... Raleigh 

Bute, Abol. 1779 Warrenton 

Tyrrell Plymouth 

Ashe, Caldwell, Wilkes, Yancey .... Boone 

Craven, Dobbs Goldsboro 

Burke, Surry Wilkesboro 

Edgecombe, Johnston, Nash, 

Wayne Wilson 

Surry Yadkinville 

Buncombe, Burke Burnsville 



North Dakota 



Capital, Bismarck 



Many Indian tribes roamed the Dakota 
plains when the white man began to 
build the mid-section of the American 
continent. Although explorers had visit- 
ed the section off and on since the 
early 1700s, it was not until 1851 that 
the region was thrown open for settle- 
ment. 

The first settlers were attracted there 
by the highly productive Red River 



district soil. That river is the boundary 
line between North Dakota and Minne- 
sota. Farm folks from the northern 
European countries, especially from 
Norway, came there in large numbers 
in the mid 1800s. In the early days of 
the section, bloody skirmishes between 
the Redmen and the settlers were com- 
mon place occurances. 

The Dakota Territory was organized 



120 



THIRD EDITION OF THE HANDY BOOK FOR GENEALOGISTS 



in 1861. It embraced the two Dakotas 
and Montana and Wyoming. In 1864 the 
Wyoming and Montana parts of the 
territory were formed into a separate 
section as the Montana Territory. The 
remaining Dakota Territory was divided 
about equally, north and south, into 
North Dakota and South Dakota about 
1873. In 1889 North Dakota became the 
thirty-ninth state in the Union. 

It was the vision of homes and fertile 
acres, big barns and cattle, that drew 
the poor peasants of northern and mid- 
dle Europe to North Dakota. From 
Norway they came in the largest num- 
bers, scattering all over the state. They 
were accompanied by large groups of 
Swedes, Danes and Icelanders, while 
numbers of Czechs, Poles and Dutch also 
came at that time. Previously French- 
Canadians came down from the north 
following the Red River. Many Germans 
and other Europeans settled around Bis- 
marck and the south-central counties 
as indicated by the many German place 



names in that area, like Lepzig, Strass- 
burg, and Danzig. 

Genealogical records are difficult to 
obtain in North Dakota. No birth or 
death records are obtainable from the 
county offices. They must come from the 
office of the State Registrar of Vital 
Statistics, Bismarck, N. D. Marriag? 
records are also on file there, but may 
also be secured from the Judge of the 
county in which the ceremony was per- 
formed. 

The County Clerks have charge of all 
estate matters and wills. The Register 
of deeds has charge of deeds and land 
titles. 

North Dakota Libraries — Bismarck, 
(Burleigh), State Library, (North Dakota 
lore); Fargo, (Cass), Public Library; 
North Dakota Agricultural Colllege Li- 
brary; Grand Forks, (Grand Forks), 
University of North Dakota Library, 
(North Dakota and Scandinavian lore); 
Minot, (Ward), Public Library; North 
Dakota State Teachers College Library. 



North Dakota County Histories 

(Population figures to nearest thousand, 1950 Census) 











Census 




Map 


Date 


Pop. 


Reports 


Name 


Index 


Formed 


By M 


Available 


Adams 


E4 


1907 


5 




Barnes 


B3 


1875 


17 


1880 


Benson 


C2 


1883 


11 




Billings 


F3 


1879 


2 


1880 


Bottineau 


Dl 


1873 


12 


1884 


Bowman 


F4 


1883 


4 




Burke 


El 


1910 


7 




Burleigh 


D3 


1873 


26 


1800 


Cass 


A3 


1873 


59 


1880 


Cavalier 


Bl 


1873 


12 


1880 


Dickey 


B4 


1881 


9 




Divide 


Fl 


1910 


6 




Dunn 


E3 


1883 


7 




Eddy 


B2 


1885 


5 




Emmons 


C4 


1879 


10 


1880 


Foster 


B3 


1873 


5 


1880 


Golden Valley F3 


1912 


3 




Grand Forks A2 


1879 


39 


1880 


Grant 


E4 


1916 


7 




Griggs 


B3 


1881 


5 




Hettinger 


E4 


1883 


7 




Kidder 


C3 


1873 


6 


1880 


LaMoure 


B4 


1873 


9 


1880 


Logan 


C4 


1873 


6 


1880 


McHenry 


D2 


1873 


13 


1880 


Mcintosh 


C4 


1883 


8 




McKenzie 


F2 


1883 


7 




McLean 


D2 


1883 


19 




Mercer 


E3 


1875 


9 


1880 



Parent County County Seat 

Stark Hettinger 

Cass -^ Valley City 

Ramsey Minnewaukan 

Unorganized Territory Medora 

Unorganized Territory Bottineau 

Billings Bowman 

Ward Bowbells 

Buffalo discontinued Bismarck 

Original county Fargo 

Pembina Langdon 

Lamoure Ellendale 

Williams Crosby 

Howard discontinued Manning 

Foster New Rockford 

Unorganized Territory Linton 

Pembina Carrington 

Billings Beach 

Pembina Grand Forks 

Morton Carson 

Foster Cooperstown 

Stark Mott 

Buffalo Steele 

Pembina La Moure 

Buffalo Napoleon 

Buffalo Towner 

Logan Ashley 

Howard Watford City 

Stevens Washburn 

Original county Stanton 



NORTH DAKOTA 



121 



County Map of North Dakota 

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122 



THIRD EDITION OF THE HANDY BOOK FOR GENEALOGISTS 



Name 



Census 
Map Date Pop. Reports 

Index Formed By M Available 



Morton 


D3 


1878 


19 


1880 


Mountrail 


F2 


1909 


9 




Nelson 


B2 


1883 


8 




Oliver 


D3 


1885 


3 




Pembina 


Al 


1871 


14 


1880 


Pierce 


C2 


1887 


8 




Ramsey 


B2 


1873 


14 


1880 


Ransom 


A4 


1873 


9 


1880 


Renville 


El 


1873 


5 


1880 


Richland 


A4 


1873 


20 


1880 


Rolette 


CI 


1873 


11 


1880 


Sargent 


A4 


1883 


8 




Sheridan 


D2 


1873 


5 


1880 


Sioux 


D4 


1914 


4 




Slope 


F4 


1915 


2 




Stark 


E3 


1879 


16 


1880 


Steele 


A3 


1871 


5 


1880 


Stutsman 


B3 


1873 


24 


1880 


Towner 


CI 


1885 


6 




Traill 


A3 


1875 


11 


1880 


Walsh 


A2 


1881 


19 




Ward 


D2 


1885 


19 




Wells 


C3 


1881 


10 




Williams 


Fl 


1890 


16 





Parent County County Seat 

Original county Mandan 

Ward Stanley 

(Old Mountrail annexed to Ward in 1891) 

Foster, Grand Forks Lakota 

Mercer Center 

Indian Lands Cavalier 

De Smet Rugby 

Pembina Devils Lake 

Pembina Lisbon 

Duel, Pembina Mohall 

Original county Wahpeton 

Buffalo Rolla 

Ransom Forman 

Buffalo McClusky 

Standing Rock Reservation .... Fort Yates 

Billings Amidon 

Unorganized Territory Dickinson 

Original county Finley 

Pembina Jamestown 

Rollette Cando 

Grand Forks Hillsboro 

Grand Forks Grafton 

Renville Minot 

Sheridan Fessenden 

Mountrail Williston 



Ohi 



to 

Capital, Columbus 



Prior to the mid-1700s the established 
American communities were located east 
of the Alleghenies along the Atlantic 
Coast. The constantly increasing popula- 
tion was ever on the alert for the best 
available land at the lowest possibJe 
cost. The presence of numerous Indian 
tribes prevented the land-longing immi- 
grants from going too far away from 
the colonies established along the At- 
lantic sea coast. 

For a long time the French and the 
British had quarrelled over the owner- 
ship of a large tract east of the Missis- 
sippi, between the Ohio River and Can- 
ada. After France had rescinded all 
claims to the territory and had trans- 
ferred jurisdiction of the area to Brit- 
ain, the United States claimed posses- 
sion by virtue of its victory over the 
British in the Revolutionary War. 

The idea then prevailed for a time 
that the boundary lines of the original 
colonies would be extended westv/ard 
to include the newly acquired territory. 
After the creation of the Northwest 
Territory in 1787 that idea was discard- 



ed. Instead the central government de- 
cided the land should be used to pay 
off the soldiers in the Revolutionary 
War and it was opened for settlement 
through the Ordinance of 1787 establish- 
ing the Northwest Territory. 

Within sixty-one years five full states 
and part of a sixth had been created 
and admitted into the union from the 
Northwest Territory. 

Massachusetts and Connecticut not- 
too-ardent Puritans formed the Ohio 
Company which purchased about a mil- 
lion acres of land for two-thirds of a 
dollar per acre, including what after- 
wards became Washington, Noble, Mor- 
gan, Athens, Meigs, and Gallia coun- 
ties. 

Known as the Virginia Military Boun- 
ty, about four and a quarter mllion 
acres were set aside between the Scioto 
and the Little Miami Rivers for settle- 
ment by Virginians and Kentuckians 
about 1800. 

The Chillicote section in Ross County 
attracted many impatient and unre- 
strained Kentuckians and Tennesians. 



OHIO 123 

During the last two or three years in Residents of Maryland settled in Sen- 
the 1870s' two other districts were eca County. 

thrown open to settlers. The first of From Massachusetts came settlers to 
these movements brought large groups Knox, Meigs and Washington counties, 
of Scotch-Irish, Germans and Quakers Many New Englanders came to Ath- 
from the neighboring Pennsylvania, ens, Knox, Lorain, Crawford, and Wood 
across the Ohio to the section from whicli counties. 

later were created Columbiana, Carroll. From New Jersey came many people 
Jefferson, Harrison, Belmont, and Mori- to Hamilton, Warren and Logan coun- 
roe counties. ties. 

The second of these migrations brought From North Carolina came settlers 
settlers from New Jersey floating down to Clinton and Highland counties, 
the Ohio and settling the area between From New York early settlers estaii- 
thc two Miami Rivers, the Little and Ushed themselves in Delaware and Sen- 
tho Big. They and some Scotch-Irish and eca counties. 

Dutch began the cultivation of some 300,- From Pennsylvania settlers came to 
000 acres in that southwestern corner Harrison, Jefferson, Monroe, Coshoctoi, 
of Ohio. Cincinnati became an important Hocking, Holmes, Jackson, Tuscarawas, 
part of that colonization. Ashland, Clinton, Highland, Pickaway, 

After General Anthony Wayne and Pike, Miami, Allen, Hancock, Logan, 
his United States' forces had driven the Putnam, and Seneca counties, 
hostile Indian tribes westward from the From Scotland came immigrants to 
Lake Erie section in 1794, another four Knox County. 

million acre tract, known as the West- Scotch-Irish settlers came into Col- 
ern Reserve, was opened for settlement umbiana County. 

in the northeast corner of Ohio, along Virginians settled in Jefferson, Mon- 
Lake Erie. It was settled mainly by roe, Coshoctan, Hocking, Jackson, Adams, 
former Connecticut residents. Closely Fayette, Greene, Pickaway, Pike, Ross, 
allied with that project was the settle- and Logan counties. 

ment of the half-a-million acres in what From We$t Virginia settlers found 
became the Erie and the Huron county their way into Tuscawara County, 
just south of Lake Erie. The settlers of in 1799 Ohio was organized as*^ a terri- 
that tract were also former Connect!- tory included in which was the Indiana 
cut residents whose holdings had been section. The very next year, Indiana was 
burned out by the British during the organized as a Territory, and in 1803 
Revolutionary War. For that reason Ohio became a state ,the seventeenth 
that section was often referred to as in the Union, 
"the Fire Lands." Birth and death records before 1909 

During the War, English colonists are in the custody of the Clerks of the 
and Tories were moved west from the Probate Court in the respective coun- 
seaboard colonies to a narrow tract ties, and in the offices of the City 
four or five counties wide about straight Board of Health. From 1909 to the pre- 
west of the present Wheeling, W. Va, sent the records are in the charge of the 
It was known as the Refugee Tract. Department of Health, Columbus, Ohio. 

After 1815 the large north-western sec- Marriage records and licenses are on 
tion of the state was thrown open to file in each county office of the Clerk 
settlers who flocked there from east and of the Probate Court, where are also 
south. The opening of the Erie Canal records of wills and real estate mat- 
m 1825 brought more settlers along that ters. 
route from the north-eastern states. Each County Recorder has charge of 

Early Connecticut residents later set- land records within the county, 
tied in Lawrence, Meigs, Washington Much genealogical information is ob- 
Cuyahoga, Erie. Geauga, Huron, and Lake tainable in the following libraries: 
counties. Akron, (Summit), Akron Beacon Journal 

French immigrants established homes Library, 44 E. Exchange St., (news- 
in Gallia County. papers); Public Library, 11 Summit St.; 

Germans settled in Columbiana. Noble, Canton, (Stark), Public Library Associa- 
Perry, Auglaize, Crawford, Henry, Ot- tion, 326 Third St., S. W.; Cincinnati, 
tawa, Wood, and Defiance counties. (Hamilton), Chamber of Commerce Li- 

Kentuckians settled in Adams Clin- brary, (historical collections) ; Public Li- 
ton, Fayette, Greene and Ross counties, brary, 629 Vine St., (Ohio Valley history 



124 



THIRD EDITION OF THE HANDY BOOK FOR GENEALOGISTS 



and genealogy, old family Bibles); Circle- 
ville, (Pickaway), Pickaway County Dis- 
trict Public Library, Main St., (Ohio his- 
tory and genealogical collections); Cleve- 
land, (Cuyahoga), City Public Library, 
325 Superior Ave., (Ohio lore); County 
Public Library, 1150 W. Third St.; West- 
ern Reserve Historical Society Library, 
10825 East Blvd.; Columbus, (Franklin), 
Public Library, 96 S. Grant Ave.; Ohio- 
ana Library; Ohio State Archaeological & 
Historical Society Library; State Library, 
State Office Bldg.; Dayton, (Montgom- 
ery), Public Library, 215 E. Third St., 



(Dayton and Miama Valley collections); 
Delaware, (Delaware), Ohio Wesleyan 
University, (Ohio Methodists Historical 
Society); Oxford, (Butler), Miami Uni- 
versity Library, (Ohio Valley history); 
Portsmouth, (Scioto), Public Library, 
(old Northwest Territory collections); 
Toledo, (Lucus), Public Library, 325 
Michigan St., (Northwestern Ohio his- 
tory and genealogy); University of To- 
ledo Library, 2801 West Bancroft St., 
(American biographies and histories); 
Youngstown (Mahoning), City and Coun- 
ty Library, 305 Wick Ave., (local his- 
tory and genealogy). 



Ohio County Histories 

(Population figures to nearest thousand, 1950 Census] 



Name 

Adams 

Allen 

Ashland 

Ashtabula 

Athens 

Auglaize 



Map 
Index 

D2 
Bl 
B3 
A4 
C3 
Bl 



Belmont C4 

Brown D2 

Butler CI 

Carroll B4 

Champaign C2 

Clark C2 

Clermont D2 

Clinton C2 

Columbiana B4 

Coshocton B3 

Crawford 

Cuyahoga 

Darke 

Defiance 

Delaware 

Erie 

Fairfield 

Fayette 

Franklin 

Fulton 

Gallia 

Geauga 

Greene 

Guernesy 

Hamilton 

Hancock 

Hardin 

Harrison 

Henry 

Highland 

Hocking 

Holmes 



B2 
A3 
CI 
Al 
B2 
A3 
C3 
C2 
C2 
A2 
D3 
A3 
C2 
C3 
Dl 
B2 
B2 
B4 
A2 
D2 
C3 
B3 



Date Pop. 
Formed By M 



1797 
1820 
1846 
1807 
1805 
1848 



20 
88 
33 
79 
46 
31 



1801 88 

1817 22 

1803 147 

1832 19 



1805 
1817 
1800 
1810 
1803 
1811 
1820 
1810 
1809 
1845 
1808 
1838 
1800 
1810 
1803 
1850 
1803 
1805 
1803 
1810 
1790 
1820 
1820 
1814 
1820 
1805 
1818 
1824 



27 
112 
42 
26 
99 
31 
39 
1390 
42 
26 
30 
53 
52 
23 
503 
26 
25 
27 
59 
38 
724 
44 
29 
19 
22 
28 
20 
19 



Census 
Reports 

Available Parent County County Seat 

1820-80 1 of 4 Orig. Cos West Union 

1830-80 Mercer Lima 

1850-80 Wayne Ashland 

1820-80 Trumbull Jefferson 

1820-80 Washington Athens 

1850-80 Allen, Logan, Drake, 

Shelby, Mercer Wapakoneta 

1820-80 Jefferson St. Clairsville 

1820-80 Adams, Clermont Georgetown 

1820-80 Hamilton Hamilton 

1840-80 Columbiana, Stark, 

Harrison, Jefferson Carrollton 

1820-80 Greene, Franklin Urbana 

1820-80 Champaign, Madison, (Greene .... Springfield 

1820-80 Original county Batavia 

1820-80 Highland Wilmington 

1820-80 Jefferson, Washington Lisbon 

1820-80 Muskingum Coshocton 

1830-80 Old Indian Territory Bucyrus 

1820-80 Geauga Cleveland 

1820-80 Miami Greenville 

1850-80 Williams, Henry, Paulding Defiance 

1820-80 Franklin Delaware 

1840-SO Huron, Sandusky Sandusky 

1820-80 Franklin Lancaster 

1820-80 Ross, Highland Washington C. H. 

1830-80 Ross Columbus 

1850-80 Lucas, Henry, Williams Wauseon 

1820-80 Washington Gallipolis 

1820-80 Trumbull Chardon 

1820-80 Hamilton, Ross Xenia 

1820-80 Belmont Cambridge 

1820-80 1 of 4 Orig. Cos Cincinnati 

1830-80 Indian Lands Findlay 

1820-80 Indian Lands Kenton 

1820-80 Jefferson, Tuscarawas Cadiz 

1830-80 Wood Napoleon 

1820-80 Ross, Adams, Clermont Hillsboro 

1820-80 Athens, Ross Logan 

1830-80 Coshocton Millersburg 



OHIO 



125 











Census 




Map 


Date 


Pop. 


Reports 


Name 


Index 


Formed 


By M 


Available 


Huron 


B3 


1809 


39 


1820-80 


Jackson 


D3 


1816 


28 


1820-80 


Jefferson 


B4 


1797 


96 


1820-80 


Knox 


B3 


1808 


35 


1820-80 


Lake 


A3 


1840 


76 


1840-80 


Lawrence 


D3 


1816 


49 


1820-80 


Licking 


C3 


1817 


71 


1820-80 


Logan 


B2 


1817 


31 


1820-80 


Lorain 


A3 


1822 


148 


1830-80 


Lucas 


A2 


1835 


396 


1840-80 


Madison 


C2 


1810 


22 


1820-80 


Mahoning 


B4 


1846 


258 


1850-80 


Marion 


B2 


1824 


50 


1830-80 


Medina 


B3 


1812 


40 


1820-80 


Meigs 


D3 


1819 


23 


1820-80 


Mercer 


Bl 


1820 


28 


1820-80 


Miami 


CI 


1807 


61 


1820-80 


Monroe 


B4 


1813 


15 


1820-80 


Montgomer 


yCl 


1805 


398 


1820-80 


Morgan 


C3 


1818 


13 


1820-80 


Morrow 


B2 


1848 


17 


1850-80 



Parent County County Seat 

Indian Lands Norwalk 

Pike Jackson 

Original county Steubenville 

Fairfield Mt. Vernon 

Geauga, Cuyahoga Painesville 

Gallia Ironton 

Fairfield Newark 

Champaign Bellefontaine 

Huron, Cuyahoga, Medina Elyria 

Wood Toledo 

Fayette London 

Columbiana, Trumbull Youngstown 

Crawford Marion 

Portage Medina 

Gallia, Athens Pomeroy 

Darke Celina 

Montgomery Troy 

Belmont, Wash., Guernsey .... Woodsfield 

Hamilton, Ross Dayton 

Washington McConnelsville 

Knox( Marion, Delaware, 

Richland Mt. Gilead 



County Map of Ohio 



B 




126 



THIRD EDITION OF THE HANDY BOOK FOR GENEALOGISTS 



Muskingum C3 1804 75 1820-80 Washington, Fairfield Zanesville 

Noble 03 1851 12 1860-80 Monroe Caldwell 

Ottawa A2 1840 29 1840-80 Erie, Sandusky, Lucas Port Clinton 

Paulding Bl 1820 15 1830-80 Indian Lands Paulding 

Perry C3 1817 29 1820-80 Washington, Fairfield, 

Muskingum New Lexington 

Pickaway C2 1810 29 1820-80 Ross, Fairfield, Franklin Circleville 

Pike D2 1815 15 1820-80 Ross, Highland, Scioto Waverly 

Portage B3 1807 64 1820-80 Trumbull, Jackson Ravenna 

Preble CI 1808 27 1820-80 Montgomery, Butler Eaton 

Putnam Bl 1820 25 1830-80 Old Indian Territory Ottawa 

Richland B3 1813 91 1820-80 Knox Mansfield 

Ross C2 1798 54 1800-80 6th Co. from N.-west Terr Chillicothe 

Sandusky A2 1820 46 1820-80 Huron Fremont 

Scioto D2 1803 83 1820-80 Indian Territory Portsmouth 

Seneca B2 1824 83 1820-80 Sandusky Tiffin 

Shelby Bl 1819 28 1820-80 Miami Sidney 

Stark B3 1809 283 1820-80 Old Indian Land Canton 

Summit B3 1840 440 1840-80 Portage, Medina. Stark Akron 

Trumbull A4 1800 159 1820-80 Jefferson Warren 

Tuscarawas B3 1808 70 1820-80 Jefferson New Philadelphia 

Union B2 1820 21 1820-80 Franklin, Madison, Logan .... Marysville 

Van Wert Bl 1820 27 1830-80 Indian Territory Van Wert 

Vinton C3 1850 11 1850-80 Gallia, Athens, Ross, Jackson .... McArthur 

Warren CI 1803 39 1820-80 Hamilton Lebanon 

Washington C3 1788 44 1820-80 Original county Marietta 

Wayne B3 1796 59 1820-80 Original county Wooster 

Williams Al 1834 26 1830-80 Henry Bryan 

Wood A2 1820 60 1830-80 Indian Lands Bowling Green 

Wyandot B2 1845 20 1850-80 Marion, Crawford, 

Hardin, Hancock Upper Sandusky 

Census Note — All 1800 and 1810 schedules of the Federal Census are missing; 
the 1820 schedules for Franklin and Wood counties are also missing. 



Oklahoma 



Capital, Oklahoma City 



"Westward" for the red man ended 
with Oklahoma when it became the last 
gathering place of the displaced Indian. 
Here the Indian gave up the nomadic 
existance of his forefathers and accepted 
the white man's mode of living. 

Little significance attaches to the fact 
that Spanish and French explorers, in 
search of the proverbial pot of gold 
at the end of the rainbow, traversed 
the Oklahoma section time and again 
from 1590. 

While the territory was still dedicated 
for the use of the Indians, white set- 
tlers came there in such hordes to se- 
cure land that eventually they had to 
be driven away by United States soldiers. 
The clamor for more land became so 
vociferous that the government purchas- 
ed from the Indians about two million 
acres in the section adjacent to Logan 



and Oklahoma counties. 

During the influx of new settlers, Illi- 
nois, Iowa and Kansas farmers seemed 
to favor the western and the north- 
v/estern sections of the state, while those 
from Arkansas, Missouri and Texas pre- 
ferred the southern and the eastern 
parts of the state. 

After Oklahoma became part of the 
United States with the Louisiana Pur- 
chase in 1803, it was included in the In- 
diana Territory. In 1812 it was com- 
bined with the Missouri Territory, and 
in 1819 with the Arkansas Territory. 
For several years, most of Oklahoma 
was included in what was called the 
Indian Territory, which continued until 
about 1893 when the section was divided 
into the Indian Territory and the Okla- 
homa Territory, the latter being thrown 
open to white settlements. 



OKLAHOMA 



127 



In 1890 the Territorial Government was 
established with Guthrie as its first 
Capital. 1891 saw two new counties 
formed and in 1892 six more were form- 
ed. The Cherokee Outlet in the north- 
west section of the state, next to the 
panhandle, was opened for white settlers 
in 1893. A court decision and an act of 
congress awarded Greer County to 
Oklahoma in 1896. Prior to that time it 
had been claimed by both Oklahoma and 
Texas. In 1906 Congress passed the en- 
abling act. Oklahoma became the forty- 
sixth state to enter the Union when it 
was admitted November 16, 1907. The 
capital was moved from Guthrie to 
Oklahoma City in 1910. 

The first seven counties of the Okla- 
homa Territory were designated First, 
Second, Third, Fourth, Fifth, Sixth and 
Seventh, thereafter, as other counties 
were added they were named after the 
letters of the alphabet. Later on by vote 
of the people they were given their pres- 
ent names. The original seven counties 
took the following names when this 
change was accomplished: Logan, Cleve- 
land, Oklahoma, Canadian, Kingfisher, 
Payne and Beaver. 

Birth and death records since 1908 
are obtainable at the Department of 
Health, Division of Vital Statistics, 
Oklahoma City, Okla. 

Marriage records may be obtained 



from the respective County Clerks, who 
also have supervision of all court and 
land records. 

Johnson, Roy. M., Oklahoma South of 
the Canadian. Historical and biographical. 
Published by S. J. Clarke Publishing Co., 
Chicago. 1925. Three Vols. 

Oklahoma libraries — Muskogee, (Mus- 
kogee) Public Library; Oklahoma, 
(Oklahoma), City Public Library, NW 
at Robinson; Oklahoma Historical So- 
ciety Library, Historical Bldg., (histori- 
cal and genealogical collections) ; State 
Library, 109 State Capital, (biography, 
genealogy); Tulsa, (Tulsa), Public Li- 
brary, 220 South Cheyenne Ave., (Tul- 
sa and Oklahoma histories). 

We are indebted to Mrs. Merlyn 
Houck, Rt. 2, Stillwater, Okla. for infor- 
mation on the organization of the count- 
ies of Oklahoma. In checking it with the 
information found in the 1953 Handy 
Book for Genealogists we noted con- 
siderable discord. A further check was 
made with other sources and these some- 
times confirmed either one or the other 
and in some cases gave still different 
data. In the Oklahoma County Histories 
which follow you will find printed in 
parenthesis the data furnished by Mrs. 
Houck which does not coincide with that 
found in the 1953 Handy Book for Gene- 
alogists. In each case the information 
from Mrs. Houck is under the data in 
question. 



Oklahoma County Histories 

(Population figures to nearest thousand. 1950 Census) 



Name 


Map 
Index 


Date 
Formed 


Pop. 
By M 


Census 

Reports 

Available 


Adair 


B4 


1907 


15 




Alfalfa 


B2 


1907 


11 




Atoka 


D3 


1907 


14 




Beaver 


Al 


1890 
(1892) 


7 




Beckham 


CI 


1907 


22 




Blaine 


B2 


1895 
(1892) 


15 




Bryan 


D3 


1907 


29 




Caddo 


C2 


1891 
(1906) 


35 




Canadian 


C2 


1890 


26 




Carter 


D2 


1907 


36 




Cherokee 


B4 


1907 


19 




Choctaw 


D4 


1907 


20 




Cimarron 


Al 


1907 


5 




Cleveland 


C2 


1890 


41 




Coal 


C3 


1907 


8 





Parent County County Seat 

Cherokee Lands Stillwell 

Woods Cherokee 

Choctaw Lands Atoka 

Original county Beaver 

(Public Lands) 

Roger Mills Sayre 

(Green and Roger Mills) 

Original county Watonga 

( Cheyenne- Arapaho Lands) 

Choctaw Lands Durant 

Original Lands Anadarko 

(Wichita-Caddo Lands) 

Original county El Reno 

Chickasaw Lands Ardmore 

Cherokee Lands Tahlequah 

Choctaw Lands Hugo 

Beaver Boise City 

Unassigned Lands Norman 

Choctaw Lands Colgate 



128 



THIRD EDITION OF THE HANDY BOOK FOR GENEALOGISTS 



Census 
Map Date Pop. Reports 

Name Index Formed By M Available Parent County County Seat 

Comanche C2 1907 55 Kiowa, Comanche, 

Apache Lands Lawton 

Cotton D2 1912 10 Comanche Walters 

(1914) 

Craig B4 1907 18 Cherokee Lands Vinita 

Creek B3 1907 43 Creek Lands Sapulpa 

Custer CI 1891 21 Cheyenne, Arapo Lands Arapaho 

(1892) 

Day 1892 (Cheyenne-Arapaho Lands) Discontinued 

Delaware B4 1907 9 Cherokee Jay 

Dewey Bl 1895 9 Original county Taloga 

(1892) (Cheyenne-Arapaho Lands) 

Ellis Bl 1907 7 Day, Woodward Arnett 

Garfield B2 1895 53 Original county Enid 

(1893) (Cherokee Outlet) 

Garvin C2 1907 30 Chickasaw Lands Pauls Valley 

Grady C2 1907 35 Caddo, Comanche Chickasha 

(Chickasaw Lands) 

Grant B2 1895 10 Original county Medford 

(1893) (Cherokee Outlet) 

Greer CI 1890 12 Org. by Texas, to Okla. 

by court decision Mangum 

(Organized as Greer Co., Texas in 1886. An act of Congress on May 4, 1896 de- 
clared it Greer Co., Okla. A fire in 1901 destroyed the county records.) 

Harmon CI 1909 8 Greer Hollis 

Harper Bl 1905 6 Indian Lands Buffalo 

(1907) (Woods County) 

Haskell C4 1907 13 Choctaw Lands Stigler 

Hughes C3 1907 21 Creek Lands Holdenville 

(Creek and Choctaw Lands) 

Jackson CI 1907 20 Greer Altus 

Jefferson D2 1907 11 Comanche Waurika 

(Chickasaw) 
Johnston C3 1907 11 Chickasaw Lands Tishomingo 

(Choctaw Lands) 

Kay B2 1895 49 Original county Newkirk 

(1893) (Cherokee Outlet) 

Kingfisher B3 1890 13 Original county Kingfisher 

Kiowa CI 1891 19 Original county Hobart 

(1906) (Kiowa-Comanche-Apache Lands) 

Latimer C4 1907 10 Choctaw Lands Wilburton 

Le Flore C4 1907 35 Choctaw Lands Poteau 

Lincoln C3 1891 22 Original county Chandler 

(1890) (lowa-Kickapoo-Sac-Fox Lands) 

Logan B2 1891 22 Original county Guthrie 

(1890) 

Love D2 1907 8 Chickasaw Lands Marietta 

McClain C2 1907 15 Chickasaw Lands Purcell 

McCurtain D4 1907 32 Choctaw Lands Idabell 

Mcintosh C4 1907 18 Indian Lands Eufaula 

(Creek Lands) 

Major B2 1909 10 Woods Fairview 

(1907) 

Marshall D3 1907 8 Chickasaw Lands Madill 

Mayes B4 1907 20 Indian Lands Pryor 

(Cherokee Lands) 

Murray D3 1907 11 Chickasaw Lands Sulpher 

Muskogee C4 1907 66 Chickasaw Lands Muskogee 

(Creek and Cherokee Lands) 



OKLAHOMA 



129 



Census 
Map Date Pop. Reports 



Name 


Index 


Formed 


By I 


Noble 


B3 


1897 
(1893) 


12 


Nowata 


B4 


1907 


13 


Okfuskee 


C3 


1907 


17 


Oklahoma 


C2 


1891 
(1890) 


325 


Okmulgee 


C3 


1907 


45 


Osage 


B3 


1907 
(1893) 


32 


Ottawa 


B4 


1907 


32 



Parent County 

Indian Lands ... 
(Ponca-Otoe) 
Cherokee Lands 

Creek Lands 

Original county 



County Seat 

Perry- 



Pawnee B3 1897 14 

(1893) 

Payne B3 1890 46 

Pittsburg C4 1907 41 

Pontotoc C3 1907 31 



Creek Lands 

Osage Indian Lands 

Indian Lands 

(Cherokee Land) 

Indian Lands 

(Pawnee Lands) 

Original county 

Choctaw Lands 

Choctaw Lands 

(Chickasaw Lands) 



Nowata 

Okemah 

Oklahoma City 



Okmulgee 
Pawhuska 



Miami 
Pawnee 



Stillwater 
McAlester 
Ada 



County Map of Oklahoma 




130 



THIRD EDITION OF THE HANDY BOOK FOR GENEALOGISTS 



Name 


Map 
Index 


Date 
Formed 


Pop, 
By M 


Census 

Reports 

Available 


Pottawatomie €3 
Pushmataha D4 


1893 

(1891) 

1907 


44 

12 




Roger Mills CI 

Rogers B4 
Seminole C3 

Sequoyah C4 
Stephens D2 


1895 
(1892) 
1907 
1907 
(1906) 
1907 
1907 


7 

20 
41 

20 
34 




Texas 

Tillman 

Tulsa 


A2 
Dl 
B3 


1907 
1907 
1907 


14 

18 

252 




Wagoner 


B4 


1907 


17 




Washington B3 
Washita CI 

Woods Bl 


1907 

1897 

(1892) 

1893 


33 

18 

15 




Woodward 


Bl 


1907 
(1893) 


14 





Parent County County Seat 

Original county Shawnee 

(Pottawatomie-Shawnee Lands) 

Indian Lands Antlers 

(Choctaw Lands) 

Original county Cheyenne 

( Cheyenne- Arapaho Lands) 

Cherokee Lands Claremore 

Seminole Indian Lands Wewoka 

Cherokee Indian Lands Sallisaw 

Comanche County Duncan 

(Chickasaw Lands) 

Beaver Guymon 

Comanche Indian Lands Frederick 

Creek Indian Lands Tulsa 

(Creek and Cherokee Lands) 

Creek Lands Wagoner 

(Creek and Cherokee Lands) 

Cherokee Lands Bartlesville 

Indian Lands Cordell 

(Cheyenne- Arapaho Lands) 

Original county Alva 

(Cherokee Outlet) 

Indian Lands Woodward 

(Cherokee Outlet) 



Oregon 

Capital, Salem 



Arguments over prior right of Spain, 
Russia, Great Britain, and the United 
States kept things in a turmoil in the 
Oregon country while the western sec- 
tion of our nation was in preparation 
to receive the restless, moving hordes 
always headed for places where oppor- 
tunity beckoned the tireless, willing 
workers. 

Simultaneously as the Mormon Pio- 
neers were headed for the then uninvit- 
ing Utah Valleys as a refuge in relig- 
ious persecutions, and the gold-seekers 
were rushing toward California, thous- 
ands of sturdy tillers of the soil who 
already had broken virgin soil in three 
or four different states were trekking 
toward the northwest with the same en- 
thusiasm as those participating in the 
other movements. A steady stream of 
tliese prairie schooners headed toward 
the Oregon country for several years 
was attracted by a generous offer. In 
1850 the Territorial Legislature of Ore- 
gon guaranteed settlers ownership of 
considerable tracts of land if for four 
years they would live on and cultivate 
those farm lands. At the time there 



were in Oregon slightly more than 13,000 
people. The attractiveness of the free- 
land offer is evident in the four-fold 
increase in population during the follow- 
ing ten-year period. Not only did peo- 
ple from many sections of the United 
States change their residence to Ore- 
gon, but people came there from all 
parts of the world. Among European 
countries whose people came there in 
large numbers are, in order of their 
numerical contributions to its citizenry, 
Germany, Sweden, England, Norway, 
Russia, Finland, Italy, Denmark, Ire- 
land, Austria, Greece, and Czechoslo- 
vakia. 

Oregon became a territory in 1848, 
when it also embraced all of the pre- 
sent Washington and Idaho. It remain- 
ed so for eleven years and then in 
1859 became the thirty-third state in 
the Union. At that time it had been 
shrunk to its present size. 

The State Registrar, State Board of 
Health, 816 Oregon Blvd., Portland, Ore., 
has birth and death records since 1903 
and marriage records since 1907. The 
County Clerks in the respective counties 



OREGON 



131 



have marriage records since creation of 
county in some instances. The County 
Clerk also has custody of the records of 
wills and the administration of estates, 
deeds, and matters pertaining to real 
estate ownership. 

Oregon Libraries — Eugene, (Lane), 
Public Library, 1115 Willamette St. ; Uni- 
versity of Oregon Library, (Oregoniana 



and manuscripts of the Pacific North- 
west) ; Portland, (Washington), Library 
Association of Portland, 901 SW 10th 
Ave.; Oregon Historical Society Li- 
brary, 235 SW 6th Ave., (newspapers and 
manuscripts. Pacific Northwest lore); 
Salem, (Marion), The Oregon State Li- 
brary, State Library Bldg., (genealogy, 
Northwest history, Oregoniana). 



Oregon County Histories 

(Population figures to nearest thousand, 1950 Census) 

Census 

Map Date Pop. Reports 

Name Index Formed By M Available Parent County County Seat 

Baker A2 1862 16 1870-80 Unorganized Territory Baker 

Benton E2 1847 32 1850-80 Original county Corvallis 

Clackamas Dl 1843 87 1850-80 Original county Oregon City 

Clatsop El 1844 31 1850-80 Original county Astoria 

Columbia El 1854 23 1860-80 Washington St. Helens 

Coos F3 1853 42 1860-80 Umpqua, Jackson Coquille 

Crook C2 1882 9 Wasco Prineville 

Curry F4 1852 6 1860-80 Coos Gold Beach 

Deschutes D3 22 Wasco Bend 

Douglas E3 1852 55 1860-80 Umpqua Roseburg 

Gilliam CI 1885 3 Wasco, Umpqua, Umatilla Condon 

Grant B2 1887 8 Harney Canyon City 

Harney B3 1889 6 Lake Burns 

Hood River Dl 1908 13 Wasco Hood River 

Jackson E4 1852 59 1860-80 Wasco Medford 

Jefferson D2 1914 6 Wasco Madras 

Josephine E4 1856 27 1860-80 Jackson Grants Pass 

Klamath D4 1882 42 West part of Lake Co Klamath Falls 

Lake C4 1874 7 1860-80 Unorganized Territory Lakeview 

Lane E3 1851 126 1860-80 Linn, Benton Eugene 

Lincoln E2 1893 21 Benton Toledo 

Linn E2 1847 54 1850-80 Original county Albany 

Malheur A3 1887 23 Baker Vale 

Marion E2 1849 101 1850-80 Original county Salem 

Morrow Dl 1865 5 1870-80 Umatilla Heppner 

Multnomah El 1854 472 1860-80 Umpqua Portland 

Polk E2 1845 26 1850-80 Original county Dallas 

Sherman CI 1889 2 Wasco Moro 

Tillamook El 1853 19 1860-80 Clatsop, Polk, Yamhill Tillamook 

Umatilla Bl 1862 42 1870-80 Wasco Pendleton 

Union Bl 1864 18 1860-80 Umatilla La Grande 

Wallowa Al 1889 7 Union Enterprise 

Wasco D2 1854 16 1860-80 Original conty The Dalles 

Originally embraced entire Eastern Oregon 

Washington El 1843 61 1850-80 Original county Hillsboro 

Wheeler C2 1899 3 Crook, Guillam, Grant Fossil 

Yamhill E2 1843 33 1850-80 Original county McMinnville 

U. S. Census Reports available from following discontinued counties: Clark, 

1850; Lewis, 1850; Umpqua, 1860. 



132 



THIRD EDITION OF THE HANDY BOOK FOR GENEALOGISTS 




Pennsylvania 

Capital, Harrisburg 



Give me your tired, your poor, 
Your huddled masses yearning to 

breathe free. 
The wretched refuse of your teeming 

shore. 
Send these, the homeless, tempest-tost 

to me, 
I lift my lamp beside the golden door. 

Long before the Statue of Liberty had 
been contemplated or Emma Lazarus 
had written these immortal lines for 
its pedestal, William Penn extended an 
invitation to Europe's religiously perse- 
cuted and exiled to come to Pennsyl- 
vania where he had established a haven 
of religious freedom and liberty. 

Responding to the earnest solicitation 
the Society of Friends, or Quakers, came 
from England, Scotland, Ireland and 
Wales; the severely persecuted Palatines 
came from the Rhine section; the Ana- 
baptists, or Mennonites, arrived from 
Germany and Switzerland; the Church 
of the Brethren, or Dunkards, so called 
from their belief in triple baptism, came 
from Germany in 1721; the Roman 
Catholics from England came there in 
1732; the Moravians, or Czech followers 
of John Huss, came from Moravia and 
Bohemia to Pennsylvania via Georgia 
in 1740 and the so-called Dutch, who 
were Germans, not Hollanders. 

With the rapidly advancing mineral 
and business developments in the early 
1800s tens of thousands of workers came 
from Europe in the following numerical 
strength, according to Bureau of Census 
figures: Italians, Poles, Russians, Aus- 
trians, Germans, Czechs, English, Irish, 
Hungarians, Swedes, Greeks, French, 
Norwegians, Danes, and Finns. 

Scotch-Irish immigrants made their 
homes in Adams, Allegheny, Bedford, 
Bucks, Centre, Cumberland, Dauphin, 
Delaware, Fayette, Franklin, Mifflin, 
Northampton, Northumberland, Perry, 
Schuylkill, Somerset, and Westmoreland 
counties. 

Germans came into Allegheny, Bed- 
ford, Berks, Bucks, Carbon, Centre, 
Clearfield, Dauphin, Franklin, Jefferson, 
Lancaster, Lucerne, Potter. Schuylkill, 
Snyder, Union, and Westmoreland coun- 
ties. 

English families settled in Bucks, 



Clearfield, Delaware, Fayette, Lancaster, 
Lebanon, Lehigh, Montgomery, North- 
umberland, Perry, Philadelphia, and 
Westmoreland counties. 

Welsh people felt at home in Cam- 
bria, Delaware, Montgomery, and 
Schuylkill counties. 

French immigrants settled in Clear- 
field County. 

Swedes came to Delaware County. 

Connecticut settlers were transplant- 
ed into Erie, Lackawanna, Luzerne, Mc- 
Kean, Susquehanna, Tioga, Venango, 
Warren, Wayne, and Wyoming counties. 

New York residents moved into Erie, 
McKean, Susquehanna, Tioga, Venango, 
and Warren counties. 

Dutch families established themselves 
in Monroe County. 

Quakers made their homes in Phila- 
delphia. 

Mixed groups coming mainly from the 
New England states, New York and 
eastern Pennsylvania settled in Butler, 
Chester, Washington, and York coun- 
ties. 

For quite a complete list of Pennsyl- 
vania sources see page 34 of "Ways and 
Means of Identifying Ancestors," by 
Evan L. Reed. 

The 1950 Census gave Pennsylvania a 
population of 10,498,012, the third largest 
in the nation. 

Philadelphia has a population of more 
than two million; Pittsburgh, of more 
than half a million; Erie, Scanton, Read- 
ing, and Allentown, of more than 100,000. 

Of untold value to genealogical re- 
search was the law passed by the Penn- 
sylvania Assembly of 1684 which requir- 
ed inhabitants then in the province and 
all who should thereafter arrive to reg- 
ister in their respective counties. 

Marriage licenses were first issued in 
Pennsylvania about 1883. Birth and 
death records have been kept since 
1892. Until 1906 these records were kept 
ill their respective counties, since then 
they have been under the direction of the 
Bureau of Vital Statistics at Harris- 
burg, Pa. The marriage licenses are 
kept at the office of the clerks of the 
respective counties. From 1852 to 1856 
birth and death records were also re- 
corded in the counties. The birth records 



133 



134 



THIRD EDITION OF THE HANDY BOOK FOR GENEALOGISTS 



give the names of other children in the 
family. 

Pennsylvania libraries — Harrisburg, 
(Dauphin), State Library (genealogical 
department); Lancaster, (Lancaster), 
Franklin and Marshall College, Facken- 
thal Library, (state history and biogra- 
phy); Phildelphia (Philadelphia), Amer- 
ican Swedish Historical Foundation Li- 
brary, 19th St. and Pattison Ave., (bio- 
graphies of Swedish-Americans) ; The 
Free Library of Philadelphia, Logan 
Square, (Western manuscripts) ; The 
Historical Society of Pennsylvania. 1300 
Locust St., (biographies and genealogies) ; 



Pittsburgh, (Allegheny), Carnegie Free 
Public Library of Allegheny, Federal & 
Ohio Sts., (histories of Pittsburgh and 
Pennsylvania); Carnegie Library of 
Pittsburgh, 4400 Forbes St., (histories 
and biographies, Pittsburgh newspapers 
from 1768); Reading, (Berks), Public Li- 
brary, Fifth and Franklin Sts., (ma- 
terial on Pennsylvania Dutch) ; State 
College, (Centre), The Pennsylvania 
State Library, (histories and genealo- 
gies); Wilkes-Barre, (Luzerne), Oster- 
hout Free Public Library, 71 S. Frank- 
lin St., (local history); York, (York) 
Martin Memorial Public & York County 
Library, 159 E. Market St. 



Pennsylvania County Histories 







(Population 


figures to 










Census 




Map 


Date 


Pop. 


Reports 


Name 


Index 


Formed 


By M 


Available 


Adams 


C3 


1800 


44 


1800-80 


Allegheny 


CI 


1788 


155 


1790-80 


Armstrong 


Bl 


1800 


81 


1800-80 


Beaver 


Bl 


1800 


175 


1800-80 


Bedford 


C2 


1771 


41 


1790-80 


Berks 


B4 


1752 


256 


1800-80 


Blair 


C2 


1846 


140 


1850-80 


Bradford 


A3 


1810 


52 


1820-80 


Bucks 


B4 


1682 


145 


1790-80 


Butler 


Bl 


1800 


97 


1800-80 


Cambria 


B2 


1804 


210 


1820-80 


Cameron 


A2 


1860 


7 


1870-80 


Carbon 


B4 


1843 


58 


1850-80 


Centre 


B2 


1800 


66 


1800-80 


Chester 


C4 


1682 


159 


1790-80 


Clarion 


Bl 


1839 


38 


1850-80 


Clearfield 


B2 


1804 


86 


1810-80 


Clinton 


B2 


1839 


37 


1840-80 


Columbia 


B3 


1813 


53 


1820-80 


Crawford 


Al 


1800 


79 


1800-80 


Cumberland C3 


1750 


94 


1790-80 


Dauphin 


C3 


1785 


198 


1790-80 


Delaware 


C4 


1789 


414 


1790-80 


Elk 


A2 


1843 


35 


1850-80 


Erie 


Al 


1800 


219 


1800-80 


Fayette 


CI 


1783 


190 


1790-80 


Forest 


Al 


1848 


5 


1860-80 


Franklin 


C2 


1784 


76 


1790-80 


Fulton 


C2 


1850 


10 


1850-80 


Greene 


CI 


1796 


45 


1800-80 


Huntington 


C2 


1787 


41 


1790-80 


Indiana 


B2 


1803 


77 


1810-80 


Jefferson 


B2 


1804 


49 


1810-80 


Juniata 


B3 


1831 


15 


1840-80 


Lackawana 


A4 


1878 


257 


1880 


Lancaster 


C3 


1729 


235 


1790-80 


Lawrence 


Bl 


1849 


105 


1850-80 


Lebanon 


C3 


1813 


82 


1820-80 



nearest thousand, 1950 Census) 

Parent County County Seat 

York Gettysburg 

Westmorland, Washington Pittsburg 

Allegheny, Lycoming, 

Westmoreland Kittanning 

Allegheny, Washington Beaver 

Cumberland Bedford 

Bucks, Lancaster, Philadelphia .... Reading 

Huntingdon, Bedford Hollidaysburg 

Luzerne, Lycoming. Originally 

Ontario, changed 1812 Towanda 

Original county Doylestown 

Allegheny Butler 

Somerset, Bedford, Huntingdon Edensburg 
Clinton, Elk, McKean, Potter .... Emporium 

Northampton, Monroe Mauch Chunk 

Lycoming, Mifflin, Northcumberland, 

Huntingdon Bellefont 

Original county W. Chester 

Venago ,Armstrong Clarion 

Northumberland, Lycoming .... Clearfield 

Lycoming, Centre Lock Haven 

Northumberland Bloomsburg 

Allegheny Meadville 

Lancaster Carlisle 

Lancaster Harrisburg 

Chester Media 

Jefferson, McKean, Clearfield ..- Ridgeway 

Allegheny Erie 

Westmoreland Uniontown 

Jefferson, Venango Tionesta 

Cumberland Chambersburg 

Bedford McConnellsburg 

Washington Waynesburg 

Bedford Huntingdon 

Westmoreland, Lycoming Indiana 

Lycoming Brookville 

Mifflin Mifflintown 

Luzerne Scranton 

Chester Lancaster 

Beaver, Mercer New Castle 

Dauphin, Lancaster Lebanon 



PENNSYLVANIA 



135 











Census 




Map 


Date 


Pop. 


Reports 


Name 


Index 


Formed 


By M 


Available 


Lehigh 


B4 


1812 


198 


1820-80 


Luzerne 


B3 


1786 


392 


1790-80 


Lycoming 


B3 


1795 


106 


1790-80 


McKean 


A2 


1804 


57 


1810-80 


Mercer 


Bl 


1800 


112 


1790-80 


Mifflin 


B2 


1789 


44 


1790-80 


Monroe 


B4 


1836 


34 


1840-80 


Montgomery C4 


1784 


353 


1790-80 


Montour 


B3 


1850 


16 


1850-80 


Northampton B4 


1752 


185 


1790-80 


Northumber- 








land 


B3 


1772 


117 


1790-80 


Perry 


C3 


1820 


25 


1820-80 


Philadelphia C4 


1682 


2072 


1790-80 


Pike 


A4 


1814 


8 


1820-80 


Potter 


A2 


1804 


17 


1810-80 


Schuylkill 


B3 


1811 


201 


1820-80 


Snyder 


B3 


1855 


23 


1860-80 


Somerset 


C2 


1795 


82 


1800-80 


Sullivan 


A3 


1847 


7 


1850-80 


Susquehana 


A4 


1810 


32 


1820-80 


Tioga 


A3 


1804 


35 


1810-80 


Union 


B3 


1813 


23 


1820-80 


Venango 


Bl 


1800 


65 


1800-80 


Warren 


Al 


1800 


43 


1800-80 


Washington 


CI 


1781 


210 


1790-80 


Wayne 


A4 


1798 


28 


1800-80 


Westmoreland CI 


1773 


313 


1790-80 


Wyoming 


A3 


1842 


17 


1850-80 


York 


C3 


1749 


203 


1790-80 


U. S. 


Census Notes— Centre 1800 


census, part missing. 







Parent County County Seat 

Northampton Allentown 

Northumberland Wilkes-Barre 

Northumberland Williamsport 

Lycoming Smethport 

Allegheny Mercer 

Cumberland, Northumberland .... Lewiston 

Pike, Northampton Stroudsburg 

Philadelphia Norristown 

Columbia Danville 

Bucks Easton 

Lancaster, Bedford, Berks, 

Northampton Sunbury 

Cumberland New Bloomfield 

Original county Philadelphia 

Wayne Milford 

Lycoming Coudersport 

Berks, Northampton Pottsville 

Union Middleburg 

Bedford Somerset 

Lycoming Laporte 

Luzerne Montrose 

Lycoming Wellsboro 

Northumberland Lewisburg 

Allegheny, Lycoming Franklin 

Allegheny, Lycoming Warren 

Westmoreland Washington 

Northampton Honesdale 

Bedford Greensburg 

Luzerne Tunkhannock 

Lancaster York 

see Mifflin County; Westmoreland 1800 



County Map of Pennsylvania 




Rhode Island 



Capital, Providence 



Giovanni de Verazzano, a 44-year-old 
Florentine navigator, in 1524 visited 
Block Island and the site of the pre- 
sent Newport on Aquidneck Island, both 
part of today's Rhode Island. He was 
then a privateer in the French service. 

In 1636 Roger Williams, a 30-year-old 
Welshman, and some of his followers 
established the first Rhode Island settle- 
ment at Providence. His religious pro- 
nouncements, too advanced for the 



clergy to accept, led to his banishment 
from Massachusetts. An uncompromis- 
ing advocate of freedom, he held that 
difference of opinion is not a bar to 
friendship. All land he settled or tilled 
was purchased from the Indians. 

The banishment of Williams from 
Massachusetts was soon followed by 
others, including Anne Marbury Hutch- 
inson, John Clarke, and William Cod- 
dington. They established a colony at 



County Map ol Rhode Island 



B 



D 



MASS A CMUSCTTS 







13() 



RHODE ISLAND 



137 



Portsmouth in 1638. Later Clarke and 
Coddington settled Newport, after their 
attempt to establish a government bas- 
ed on the Jewish nation had failed. A 
fourth colony was established at War- 
wick in 1642. 

Many Quakers found a haven in 
Rhode Island in the early days. The 
large majority of the people who came 
into Rhode Island were former residents 
of Massachusetts. 

New England researchers have an 
abundance of material at their com- 
mand. Both the state and the cities 
have large genealogical libraries or gen- 
ealogical sections in their public librar- 
ies. The Rhode Island Historical Society 
has a wonderful assortment of books at 
52 Power Street, Providence 6, R. I. 
The Society has one of the largest gen- 
ealogical collection in New England, 
probably the third largest. Many people 
from various sections, searching for the 
progenitors among Rhode Island families 
have attained splendid results in the li- 
brary of the Rhode Island Historical 
Society. 

Rhode Island became a state in 1790, 
the thirteenth to join the Union. In 
1950 it had a population of 791,896, 
which represented a 60,000 growth in 
the previous ten year period. Only 15.7 
per cent of the population live in farm 
sections. 

Among its large numbers of industri- 
al workers are members of almost every 
nationality. Those with the largest num- 



bers are the Italians, English, Irish, Pol- 
ish, Russians, Swedes, Germans and Aus- 
trians. 

All vital statistics are in the custody 
of the town or city clerks. Birth and 
death records since 1853 are in the office 
of the Registrar of Vital Statistics, 
Providence, R. I. 

, Rhode Island libraries — Newport, (New- 
port), The Peoples Public Library; Provi- 
dence, (Providence), Brown University 
Library, (R. L. history); Providence 
Public Library, 229 Washington St. Zone 
3; Rhode Island Historical Society Li- 
brary, 52 Power St.; Rhode Island State 
Library, State House, (historical, Rev. 
War records). 

Rhode Island Towns 
Organized Before 1800 

BRISTOL COUNTY— Barrington, 1717; 
Bristol, 1681; Warren, 1746-7. 

KENT COUNTY — Coventry, 1741; 
East Greenwich, 1677; Warwick, 1642-3; 
West Greenwich, 1741. 

NEWPORT COUNTY — Jamestown 
1678; Little Compton, 1746-7; Middleton, 
1743; Newport, 1639; New Shoreman, 
1672; Portsmouth, 1638; Tiverton, 1746-7. 

PROVIDENCE COUNTY — - Cranston, 
1754; Cumberland, 1746-7; Foster ,1781; 
Glocester, 1730-1; Johnston, 1759; North 
Providence, Providence, 1636; Scituate, 
1730-1; Smithfield, 1730-1. 

WASHINGTON COUNTY — Charles- 
town, 1738; Exeter, 1742-3; Hopkinton, 
1757; North Kingston, 1641; Richmond, 
1747; South Kingston, 1657-8; Westerly, 
1669. 



Rhode Island County Histories 

(Population figures to nearest thousand, 1950 Census) 



Name 


Map 
Index 


Date 
Formed 


Pop. 
By M 


Census 

Reports 

Available 


Bristol 


C2 


1747 


29 


1790-80 


Kent 


B3 


1750 


78 


1790-80 


Newport 


D3 


1703 


62 


1790-80 


Providence 


Bl 


1793 


575 


1790-80 


Washington 


I B4 


1729 


49 


1790-80 



Parent County County Seat 

Newport Bristol 

Providence, Newport E. Greenwich 

Original county Newport 

Original county Providence 

For. Naragannset W. Kingston 



South Carolina 



Capital, Columbia 

Several attempts by the Spaniards and part of the state in 1671. The settlers 

the French to establish settlements in were a group of English people direct 

what is now South Carolina between from the Old World, and another group, 

1526 and 1664 failed. the members of which had been living 

The first colony was established on on the Barbados Island, the south-east- 

the Ashley River in the southeastern ernmost island in the West Indies group. 



138 THIRD EDITION OF THE HANDY BOOK FOR GENEALOGISTS 

They called their settlement Charles and property records were recorded at 
Town. A few months later some Dutch Charleston where they are still avail- 
families, who had left New York after able at the office of the Judge of Pro- 
the English had taken over there, estab- bate. Since the Episcopal Church held 
lished themselves along the Ashley Riv- full sway in the early days of the col- 
er. They were later joined by many ony, in 1706 an act was passed making 
families direct from Holland. the parishes its legislative units. Re- 

in 1675 a group of Quakers came into gardless of church affiliations, all per- 
the Territory. In 1680 about 45 families sons were required to register their 
of Huguenots also established homes vital statistics with the church officers, 
there. Quite a colony of dissenters from In 1783 offices of Register of Mesne 
the Episcopal Church came in 1683 (legal) Conveyance were authorized in 
from Somersetshire to the present site all counties. 

of Charleston. In that year came also an Archibald F. Bennett, secretary of the 
Irish colony and settled along the Ash- Genealogical Society of Utah, who some 
ley River, In 1684 ten families of Scotch years ago made a personal inspection 
Presbyterians established fhemselves at of all record deposits in South Carolina, 
Port Royal. says that the Judge of Probates office 

Immigrants continued to come in large in Charleston has records of wills and 
streams until by 1730 there were gather- estates back to 1692. They are recorded 
ed "on the banks of the Santee, the in chronological volumes, with indexes. 
Edisto, and the Combahee some of the Records of deeds and other estate 
best elements of the European nations, matters are available from 1719 in 
The Huguenot, the Scotch Presbyterian, Charleston. Those prior to 1719 are in 
the English Dissenter, the loyalist and the office of the Historical Commis- 
High Churchman, the Irish adventurer, sion of South Carolina in Columbia, 
and the Dutch mechanic composed the What few marriage bonds are avail- 
powerful material out of which soon able from those early days have been 
grew the beauty and renown of the printed in the 'South Carolina Histor- 
Palmetto State." (Ridpath's History of ical and Genealogical Magazine." Be- 
the United States.) tween 1778 and 1911 no marriage bonds 

From 1732 until 1736 quite a number or licenses were required in South Caro- 
of families from England, Scotland, Ire- lina, and only for brief intervals were 
land, Wales, Switzerland, and Germany such records kept. 

came into the central section of South "Records of land grants earlier than 
Carolina. Some of the first settlements 1695 are in the office of the Historical 
in the so-called *Up Country", the west- Commission of South Carolina in Col- 
ern half of the state, were created umbia," says Mr. Bennett. 'The Secre- 
from 1745 to 1760 by immigrants from tary of State in Columbia has records 
the Rhine section of Germany, the of land grants from 1695 to the pre- 
northern American colonies, and the sent time, and a plat to land grants 
Ulster section of Ireland. After the In- from 1688, warrants for entry and sur- 
dian Wars, Scotch-Irish immigrants came veys made and certified before the corre- 
about 1761. spending final grants or patents were 

In 1790 the capital of the state, was issued. The plat records and grant rec- 
moved from Charleston to Columbia. ords in the Secretary of State's office are 
From 1845 to 1850 many Irish settled in separate books. There are sets of in- 
in the state because of the potato famine dex books for plats and index books for 
in their own country. The political grants. 

struggle in Germany in 1848 brought 'In our Genealogical Library in Salt 
thousands of the expatriates to the Unit- Lake City, Utah, we have a series of 
ed States, many of them coming to seven printed volumes containing copies 
South Carolina. of the Stub Entries to Indents for Revo- 

South Carolina was the eighth state lutionary Claims. These contain valuable 
to enter the Union, 1788. More than a items for information on the service of 
hundred years before, 1683, the first soldiers who were paid or received boun- 
three counties, Berkley, Tolleton, and ty for service." 

Craven, were established. Only the Birth and death records from 1915 to 

first one exists now. the present are in the office of the 

From the settlement of South Caro- State Health Department, Columbia, S. C. 

lina in 1671 until 1783 all vital statistics Marriage records from July 1, 1950 to 



SOUTH CAROLINA 



139 



the present are also at that office. Mar- 
riages from July 1, 1911 to the present 
are at the office of the Probate Judge, 
County Court House, in respective coun- 
ty seats. 

Birth records kept at the city of 
Charleston are available since 1877 at 
the City Health Department, where also 
are available deaths from 1821 to the 
present. 

The Clerk of the Court in the var- 
ious counties has charge of wills, deeds, 
and land grants. Dates will vary with 
the different counties. 

War service records are in the cus- 
tody of Adjutant General in Columbia, 
S. C. 

Available census records are listed in 
the 'South Carolina County Histories" 
herewith. 

The South Carolina Historical and 
Genealogical Magazine, a quarterly, has 
been published regularly since 1900. It 
contains much valuable information. 
Many libraries have bound volumes of 
this magazine. 

All schedules of the U. S. Census 
for 1790 of South Dakota are avail- 
able, but are not necessarily listed in 
the names of the present counties, 
since most of them, with the probably 
exception of three, have all been formed 
after the 1790 census. 

South Carolina districts were formed 
as follows. Abbeville, 1798; Anderson, 
1826; Barnwell, 1798; Beaufort, 1768; 
Berkeley, 1683; Camden, 1768; Cartar- 
et, 1683; Charleston, 1798; Cheraws, 
1768; Chester, 1798; Chesterfield, 1798; 



Clarendon, 1798; Colleton, 1798; Dar- 
lington, 1798; Dorchester, 1785; Edge- 
field, 1798; Fairfield, 1798; Georgetown, 
1768; Granville, 1700; Greenville, 1798; 
Horry, 1801; Kershaw, 1798; Lancaster, 
1798; Laurens, 1798; Lexington, 1804; 
Marion, 1798; Marlboro, 1798; Newberry, 
1798; Orangeburg, 1798; Pickens, 1826; 
Richland, 1799; Spartanburg, 1798; Sum- 
ter, 1798; Williamsburg, 1804, and York, 
1798. 

South Carolina libraries — Charleston, 
(Charleston), Charleston Free Library, 
94 Rutledge Ave.; Columbia, (Richland), 
Richland County Public Library, 1400 
Sumter St. (South Carolina); South 
Carolina State Library; Spartanburg, 
(Spartanburg). Spartanburg Public Li- 
brary, 224 Magnolia Street. 

South Carolina books: 

Ervin, Sara Sullivan, South Carolinians 
in the Revolution, 186 pp. (Index seperate) 
Pub. 1949, DAR. 

Heads o[ Families at the First Census 
o[ the U.S. 1790, South Carolina, Govern- 
ment Printing Office, 1908. 

Revill, Janie. Copy o[ the Original In- 
dex Book Showing the Revolutionary Claims 
Filed in South Carolina between August 
20. 1783 and August 31, 1786. Kept by James 
McCall, Auditor General. 

Sally. A. S. Jr., Warrants for Lands in 
South Carolina 1672-1679. Published by the 
Historical Commission of South Carolina, 
1910. 

South Carolina Historical & Genealogical 
Magazine. Published since 1900 ^ 57 Vol. 

Young, Miss Pauline, A Collection of 
South Carolina Wills and Records. 2 
Vols. (Vol. 1 printed, vol. 2 mimeographed) 



Name 



South Carolina County Histories 

(Population figures to nearest thousand, 1950 Census) 

Census 
Map Date Pop. Reports 

Index Formed By M Available Parent County County Seat 

1800-80 District 96 Abbeville 

1880 Edgefield Aiken 

Barnwell, Hampton Allendale 

1830-80 Abbeville Anderson 

Barnwell Bamberg 

1880 Barnwell 

1790-80 Original county Beaufort 

Original county Moncks Corner 

Lexington, Orangeburg St. Mathews 

1800-80 Charleston District Charleston 

Union, York Gaffney 

1800-80 Camden District Chester 

1800-80 Cheraws District Chesterfield 

11800-80 Camden District Manning 

1800-80 Charleston District Walterboro 



Abbeville 


Bl 


1868 


22 


Aiken 


B2 


1871 


53 


Allendale 


C3 


1918 


12 


Anderson 


Al 


1868 


91 


Bamberg 


B3 


1897 


18 


Barnwell 


B2 


1868 


17 


Beufort 


C3 


1868 


27 


Berkeley 


B4 


1882 


30 


Calhoun 


B3 


1908 


15 


Charleston 


C4 


1868 


165 


Cherokee 


A2 


1897 


35 


Chester 


A2 


1868 


33 


Chesterfield 


A3 


1868 


36 


Clarendon 


B3 


1868 


32 


Colleton 


C3 


1868 


28 



140 



THIRD EDITION OF THE HANDY BOOK FOR GENEALOGISTS 



Name 



Census 
Map Date Pop. Reports 

Index Formed By M Available 



Darlington 


A3 


1868 


50 


1800-80 


Dillon 


A4 


1910 


31 




Dorchester 


B3 


1868 


23 


1880 


Edgefield 


B2 


1868 


17 


1800-80 


Fairfield 


A2 


1868 


22 


1800-80 


Florence 


A3 


1888 


80 




Georgetown 


B4 


1868 


32 


1790-80 


Greenville 


Al 


1868 


168 


1800-80 


Greenwood 


B2 


1897 


42 




Hampton 


C3 


1878 


18 


1880 


Horry 


A4 


1861 


60 


1810-80 


Jasper 


C3 


1912 


11 




Kershaw 


A3 


1868 


32 


1800-80 


Lancaster 


A3 


1868 


37 


1800-80 


Laurens 


A2 


1868 


47 


1800-80 


Lee 


A3 


1902 


23 




Lexington 


B2 


1868 


44 


1800-80 


McCormick 


B2 


1914 


10 




Marion 


A4 


1868 


33 


1800-80 


Marlboro 


A3 


1868 


32 


1800-80 


Newberry- 


B2 


1868 


32 


1800-80 


Oconee 


Al 


1865 


39 


1870-80 


Orangeburg 


B3 


1868 


69 


1800-80 


Pickens 


Al 


1868 


40 


1830-80 



Parent County County Seat 

Cherwas District Darlington 

Marion Dillon 

Berkeley County St. George 

District 96 Edgefield 

Craven Winnsboro 

Marion, Darlington Florence 

Craven County Georgetown 

District 96 Greenville 

Abbeville, Edgefield Greenwood 

Beaufort Hampton 

Kingston Conway 

Beaufort, Hampton Ridgeland 

Fairfield Camden 

Camden District Lancaster 

District 96 Laurens 

Darlington, Sumter, Kershaw .. Bishopville 

Orangeburg Lexington 

Edgefield, Abbeville McCormick 

Liberty Marion 

Cheraws District Bennettsville 

District 96 Newberry 

Pickens Wahalla 

Original district Orangeburg 

Pendleton Pickens 



County Map of South Carolina 




SOUTH CAROLINA 



141 



Census 
Map Date Pop. Reports 

Name Index Formed By M Available Parent County County Seat 

Richland B3 1868 143 2I8IO-8O Old District Columbia 

Saluda B2 1895 16 Edgefield Saluda 

Spartanburg A2 1868 150 1800-80 District 96 Spartanburg 

Sumter B3 1868 58 1800-80 District 96 Sumter 

Union A2 1873 31 1880 York Union 

Williamsburg B4 1868 44 1800-80 Georgetown Kingstree 

York A2 1868 72 1800-80 Camden District York 

1. Clarendon census schedules missing for 1820, 1830, 1840, 1850. 

2. Richland census schedules missing for 1800. 

Census schedules for the following discontinued counties are available: Clare- 
mont, 1790, 1810, (combined with Clarendon in 1798); Kingston, 1800; Liberty, ISOO; 
Pendleton, 1800, 1810, 1820; Salem, 1800, 1810; Winyaw 1800. 



South Dakota 



Capital, Pierre 



Part of the Louisiana Purchase in 
1803, the Dakotas were wedded to num- 
erous Territorities before finally becom- 
ing states. Until 1820 they were part of 
the Missouri Territory. At intervals, the 
eastern half was tied to the Terri- 
tories of Minnesota, Iowa, Wisconsin, and 
Michigan. During those periods, the 
western parts of the Dakotas belonged 
to the Nebraska Territory. The Dakotas 
were formed into a Territory by itself 
in 1861. In 1887 it was divided into two 
Territories, North and South Dakota. 

Attracted by the rich soil between the 
Big Sioux and the Missouri Rivers, farm 
families from adjoining states establish- 
ed homes there as early as 1857. Sev- 
eral communities were established, most 
of them along the Missouri, but two or 
three along the Big Sioux. The real 
influx of settlers came about 1863, after 
the passing of the first Homestead Act 
in the United States. 

South Dakota became the fortieth 
state to enter the Union. This was in 
1889. All of her 68 counties, with the 
exception of three, were already organ- 
ized at that time. 

The predominating nationality in 
South Dakota is the Norwegian. Other 
nationalities represented among its cit- 
izenry, in the order of their predomi- 
nance, are the German, Russian, Swedish, 
Danish, Czechoslovakian, English, Aus- 
trian, Irish, Finish, Polish, Greek and 



Italian. 

Records of births, marriages, divorces 
and deaths from 1905 to the present 
are on file at the office of the State 
Public Health Department, Pierre, S. D. 

Wills and probate matters are in the 
offices of the Clerk of the Court in 
each county who also have a record 
of marriages since 1905. 

All land records are at the office 
of the Register of Deeds in the county 
of filing. Land grants are at the office 
of the Commissioner of School and pub- 
lic Lands, Pierre, S. D. 

The state census records from 1890 
to the present are in charge of the Will 
Robinson Division, Department of His- 
tory, Pierre, S. D. 

Taxpayers lists are at the offices of 
the County Treasurer of each coimty. 

The war service records are under 
the direction of the Register of Deeds 
of each county. The Sexton of each ceme- 
trey is supervising the records of the 
respective cemeteries. 

Kingsbury, Geo. W., History of Dakota 
Territory. Its History and Its People. Vols, 
four and five, biographical. S. J. Clarke Pub- 
lishing Co., Chicago, 1915. 

Libraries: Aberdeen, (Brown), Alex- 
ander Mitchell Public Library, 21 6th 
Ave., SE; Pierre, (Hughs), South Da- 
ota Free Public Library Commission; 
Sioux Falls, (Minnehaha), Carnegie Free 
Public Library, Tenth & Dakota Sts. 



142 



THIRD EDITION OF THE HANDY BOOK FOR GENEALOGISTS 



South Dakota County Histories 

(Population figures to nearest thousand, 1950 Census) 



Name 



Census 
Map Date Pop. Reports 

Index Formed By M Available 



Armstrong 


C2 


1883 


.05 




Aurora 


B3 


1879 


5 


1880 


Beadle 


B2 


1873 


21 


1880 


Bennett 


D3 


1909 


3 




BonHomme 


A3 




9 




Brookings 


A2 


1868 


18 


1880 


Brown 


Bl 


1879 


33 


1880 


Brule 


B3 


1879 


6 


1880 


Buffalo 


B2 


1872 


2 


1880 


Butte 


E2 


1883 


8 




Campbell 


CI 


1873 


4 


1880 


Charles Mix B3 


1865 


16 


1880 


Clark 


A2 


1873 


8 


1880 


Clay 


A3 




11 


1862 


Codington 


A2 


1878 


19 


1880 


Corson 


Dl 


1909 


6 




Custer 


E3 


1877 


6 


1880 


Davison 


B3 


1875 


17 


1880 


Day 


Al 


1879 


12 


1880 


Deuel 


A2 


1878 


8 


1880 


Dewey 


CI 


1910 


5 




Douglas 


B3 


1873 


6 


1880 


Edmunds 


Bl 


1873 


7 


1880 


Fall River 


E3 


1883 


10 




Faulk 


B2 




5 




Grant 


Al 


1891 


10 




Gregory 


B3 


1889 


9 




Haakon 


D2 


1873 


3 


1880 


Hamlin 


A2 


1878 


7 


1880 


Hand 


B2 


1873 


7 


1880 


Hanson 


A3 


1872 


5 


1880 


Harding 


El 


1881 


2 




Hughes 


C2 


1874 


8 


1880 


Hutchinson 


A3 


1871 


11 


1880 


Hyde 


C2 


1873 


3 


1880 


Jackson 


D3 


1915 


2 




Jerauld 


B2 


1883 


4 




Jones 


C2 


1917 


2 




Kingsbury 


A2 


1879 


10 


1880 


Lake 


A2 


1873 


12 


1880 


Lawrence 


E2 


1877 


17 


1880 


Lincoln 


A3 


1871 


13 


1880 


Lyman 


C3 


1873 


5 


1880 


McCook 


A3 


1873 


9 


1880 


McPherson 


Bl 


1873 


7 


1880 


Marshall 


Al 


1885 


8 




Meade 


D2 


1889 


12 




Mellette 


C3 


1909 


3 




Miner 


A2 


1873 


6 




Minnehaha 


A3 


1865 


71 


1880 


Moody 


A2 


1873 


9 


1880 


Pennington 


E2 


1877 


34 


1880 


Perkins 


Dl 


1909 


7 




Potter 


C2 


1875 


5 


1880 


Roberts 


Al 


1883 


15 




Sanborn 


B2 


1883 


5 





Parent County County Seat 

Unorganized Territory 

Brule Plankinton 

Spink, Clark Huron 

Indian Lands Martin 

Charles Mix Tyndall 

Unorganized Territory Brookings 

Beadle Aberdeen 

Old Buffalo (disc.) Chamberlain 

Territorial County Gannvalley 

Harding Belle Fourche 

Buffalo Mound City 

Original District Lake Andes 

Hanson Clark 

Vermillion 

Indian Lands Watertown 

Boreman, Dewey Mcintosh 

Indian Lands Custer 

Hanson Mitchell 

Clark Webster 

Brookings Clear Lake 

Indian Reservation Timber Lake 

Charles Mix Armour 

Buffalo Ipswich 

Custer Hot Springs 

Faulkton 

Codington, Deuel Milbank 

Burke 

Changed from Schasse Phillip 

Deuel Hayti 

Buffalo Miller 

Buffalo, Deuel Alexandria 

Unorganized Territory Buffalo 

Buffalo Pierre 

Unorganized Territory Olivet 

Buffalo Highmore 

Stanley Kadoka 

Aurora Wessington Springs 

Lyman Murdo 

Hanson De Smet 

Brookings, Hanson Madison 

Unorganized Territory Deadwood 

Minnehaha Canton 

Unorganized Territory Kennebec 

Hanson Salem 

Buffalo Leola 

Day Britton 

Lawrence Sturgis 

Tripp White River 

Hanson Howard 

Territorial County Sioux Falls 

Brookings, Minnehaha Flandreau 

Unorganized Territory Rapid City 

Harding, Butte Bison 

Buffalo Gettysburg 

Grant Sisseton 

Miner Woonsocket 



SOUTH DAKOTA 



143 



Name 

Shannon 

Spink 

Stanley 

Sully 



Map 
Index 



B2 
C2 
C2 



Date Pop. 
Formed By M 



E3 1875 



1879 
1873 
1890 



12 
2 
3 



Census 

Reports 

Available 

1880 



1880 
1880 



Parent County County Seat 

Territorial County 

Attached to Fall Fiver County 

Hanson, Walworth Redfield 

Unorganized Territory Ft. Pierre 

Potter Onida 



County Map of South Dakota 



D 




144 



THIRD EDITION OF THE HANDY BOOK FOR GENEALOGISTS 



Census 
Map Date Pop. Reports 

Name Index Formed By M Available Parent County County Seat 

Todd C3 1871 5 1880 Indian Lands 

Attached to Tripp 

Tripp C3 1873 9 1880 Unorganized Territory Winner 

Turner A3 1871 12 1880 Lincoln Parker 

Union A3 1864 11 1880 Unorganized Territory Elk Point 

Walworth CI 1868 8 1880 Territorial County Selby 

Washabaugh D3 1883 2 Indian Lands 

Attached to Jackson 

Yankton A3 1884 17 Unorganized Territory Yankton 

Ziebach D2 1869 3 1880 Pennington Dupree 

Discontinued counties: Old Buffalo, Boreman, Granter (changed to Grant), 
Schasse (changed to Haakon), Wallette, Washington. 



Tennessee 



Capital, Nashville 



Four or five hostile Indian tribes in- 
habited Tennessee up to as late as 1800. 
Explorers, representing Spain, France, 
and England, visited the territory inter- 
mittently from about 1540 until the early 
part of the seventeen hundreds. 

White settlers moved into what later 
became Sullivan and Hawkins counties 
in the northeast corner of the state and 
established settlements as early as 1772. 

The Blue Ridge Mountains, which form 
the boundary between North Carolina 
and Tennessee, are barriers to travel. 
They were so more in the early days 
than now. For that reason it was easier 
to come into Tennessee from the north 
than from the east. Many of the settlers 
therefore came into Tennessee from Vir- 
ginia. It was in fact thought by some 
that it was part of that state. 

In those early days came several fam- 
ilies into the northeast corner of Ten- 
nessee from the Uplands of North Caro- 
lina. They banded together as the Wat- 
auga Association and spread over the 
eastern part of the section. North Car- 
olina shortly accepted the district as 
Washington County which eventually 
embraced all of the present Tennessee. 
To secure federal protection for that 
territory, North Carolina handed it to 
the national government as a present. 
But apparently no one in Washington 
became enthusiastic about the gift, re- 
fusing even to acknowledge it. After it 
had been ignored for four or five years 



some of the settlers retaliated by organ- 
izing the territory into a new state, 
Franklin. But even that action received 
cold treatment from Washington, and 
eventually vanished into the air. 

Most of the early settlers in Tennessee 
came from North Carolina. Almost equal 
numbers came from South Carolina and 
Virginia. Many of the Tennessee coun- 
ties were settled by Scotch-Irish immi- 
grants coming into the state via the 
Shenandoah Valley. Many German fam- 
ilies settled in several of the counties 
west of Chattanooga where still live 
many of their descendants. 

Many Tennessee counties were settled 
years before they were formed into 
counties. Some of those counties and the 
dates of their earliest settlement are 
as follows: Johnson, 1770; Washington, 
1772; Robertson, 1776; Greene, 1778; 
Sumner, 1779; Hawkins, Hamilton, Dav- 
idson, Montgomery, 1780; Hamblen, Jef- 
ferson, Cooke, Jackson, 1783; Grainger, 
Williamson, 1784; Blount, 1786; Smith, 
1787; Cheatham, 1790; Dickson, Stewart, 
1793; Claiborne, 1794; Hancock, 1795; 
Campbell, 1796; De Kalb, Wilson, 1797; 
Houston, Trousdale, 1798; Anderson, 
Franklin, Humphreys, Moore, Van Bur- 
en, 1800; Lincoln, 1806; Morgan, Lewis, 
Marshall, Maury, 1807; Lawrence, Hen- 
derson, 1815; Marion, Meiga, Benton, 
1817; McMinn, Gibson, Hardeman, Hard- 
in, Henry, Madison, McNairy, Obion, 
Shelby, Weakley, 1819; Carroll, Decatur, 



TENNESSEE 145 

Lauderdale, 1820; Haywood, 1821; Fay- service records in the state is held by 

ette, 1822; Crockett, 1823; Lake, 1825; the office of the Adjutant General, Em- 

T> iL- iR^fi ployment Security Bldg., Nashville, 

Polk, 183b. Tenn. There may not be many records 

It should be noted that the counties ^f ^^e early wars. There are records 

to be settled first were in the East of Tennesseans who served in the Union 

and the Middle Tennessee districts, the Forces during the Civil War but not 

East district rather leading the Middle, those serving in the Confederate Army. 

The West Tennessee district was the Available are also records of the Na- 

last to be settled. tional Guard, Tennesseans who served in 

Tennessee was the sixteenth state to the Spanish-American War and World 
become a part of the Union, 1796. It War I. The State Library has a con- 
is also the sixteenth state in population siderable card index of Tennesseans who 
order, the 1950 census standing at served in the earlier wars and in the 
3,291,718. Confederate Army, but they are not 

"The Colonial and State Records of complete and not official. They merely 

North Carolina," found in many gen- indicate the sources from which the in- 

ealogical libraries, contains many re- formation may be obtained, 

cords with much history of the early A letter from the Tennessee State 

counties of Tennessee prior to 1790. The Librarian and Archivist, Mr. Dan M. 

State Library at Nashville has one of Robinson, in 1942 says, "It is my under- 

the largest genealogical sections in the standing that all the Tennessee records 

South. we have and many we do not have were 

Official registration of births and microfilmed back in the 1930's by the 

deaths began in Tennessee in 1914. Of- Genealogical Society of Utah, the Joseph 

ficial registration of marriages and di- F. Smith Memorial Building, 80 North 

vcrces began in 1945. These records may Main Street, Salt Lake City, Utah. You 

be had from the Division of Vital Sta- will probably find there the most com- 

tistics, State Dept. of Public Health, plete Tennessee records available in any 

Nashville 3. Tenn. In the larger cities one place." 

of Tennessee birth and death records Four books which may help you in 

are available for many years back, your Tennessee research are: 

Check with the office of the City Health Aklen, Jeannette Tillotson and As- 

Department in the particular city in sitants, Tennessee Bible Records and Mar- 

which your ancestors lived as you are riage Bonds. Published by Cullom and Ghert- 

ready to conduct your search. ner, Nashville, 1933. 2 Vols. 

The counties maintain marriage li- Ray, Worth S., Tennessee Cousins, A 

cense records and records of wills, deeds, history of Tennessee people. Published by 

taxpayers lists, guardianship and other the author, Austin, Texas, 1950. 

court proceedings in the respective coun- Temple, O. P., Notable Men o{ Tennes- 

ty court houses. Some of these records see, 1833-1875, published 1912 

have been transcribed and are in che WPA. Bibliography of Research Projects 

State Library. Reports. Check list of Historical Records 

The early land grants are recorded in Survey Publication, published 1940. 
the Land Grant Office of the State Di- Libraries: Chattanooga, (Hamilton), 
vision of Archives, although these re- Chattanooga Public Library, McCallis 
cords are far from complete. Although Ave.; Knoxville, (Knox), Lawson Mc- 
limited in number, there are in the Ghee Public Library, 217 Market St. 
State Library some Church or Parish (Tennessee History and Genealogy); 
records, as well as cemetery records. Memphis, (Shelby), Cossitt Public Li- 
There is no full collection of such re- brary. Front & Monroe Sts.; Nashville, 
cords in the state. (Davidson), Nashville Public Library, 

The most complete collection of war 222 8th Ave. 

Tennessee County Histories 

(Population figures to nearest thousand, 1950 Census) 

Census 
Map Date Pop. Reports 

Name Index Formed By M Available Parent County County Seat 

Anderson A2 1801 59 1830-80 Knox Clinton 

Bedford D4 1807-8 24 1820-80 Rutherford Shelbyville 

Benton C2 1835 11 1840-80 Henry, Humphreys Camden 



146 



THIRD EDITION OF THE HANDY BOOK FOR GENEALOGISTS 











Census 




Map 


Date 


Pop. 


Reports 


Name 


Index 


Formed 


By M 


Available 


Bledsoe 


B2 


1807 


9 


1830-80 


Blount 


B3 


1795 


55 


1830-80 


Bradley 


B2 


1835 


32 


1840-80 


Campbell 


A3 


1806 


34 


1830-80 


Cannon 


Bl 


1836 


9 


1840-80 


Carroll 


C2 


1821 


27 


1830-80 


Carter 


A4 


1796 


42 


1830-80 


Cheatham 


C3 


1856 


9 


1860-80 


Chester 


D2 


1875 


11 


1880 


Claiborne 


A3 


1801 


25 


1830-80 


Clay 


A2 


1870 


9 


1880 


Cocke 


B3 


1797 


23 


1830-80 


Coffee 


Bl 


1836 


23 


1840-80 


Crockett 


C2 


1845 


17 




Cumberland A2 


1856 


19 


1860-80 


Davidson 


C3 


1783 


322 


1820-80 


Decatur 


D2 


1845 


9 


1850-80 


DeKalb 


Al 


1837-8 12 


1840-80 


Dickson 


C3 


1803 


19 


1820-80 


Dyer 


CI 


1823 


33 


1830-80 


Fayette 


Dl 


1824 


28 


1830-80 


Fentress 


A2 


1823 


15 


1830-80 


Franklin 


Bl 


1807 


25 


1820-80 


Gibson 


C2 


1823 


48 


1830-80 


Giles 


D3 


1809 


27 


1820-80 


Grainger 


A3 


1796 


13 


1830-80 


Greene 


A3 


1783 


41 


1830-80 


Grundy 


Bl 


1844 


13 


1850-80 


Hamblen 


A3 


1870 


24 


1880 


Hamilton 


B2 


1819 


208 


1830-80 


Hancock 


A3 


1844 


9 


1850-80 


Hardeman 


D2 


1823 


23 


1830-80 


Hardin 


D2 


1819 


17 


1820-80 


Hawkins 


A3 


1786 


30 


1830-80 


Haywood 


Dl 


1823 


26 


1830-80 


Henderson 


D2 


1821 


17 


1830-80 


Henry 


C2 


1821 


24 


1830-80 


Hickman 


C3 


1807 


13 


1820-80 


Houston 


C3 


1871 


5 


1880 


Humphreys 


C3 


1809 


11 


1820-80 


Jackson 


Al 


1801 


12 


1820-80 


Jefferson 


A3 


1792 


20 


1830-80 


Johnson 


A4 


1836 


12 


1840-80 


Knox 


A3 


1792 


223 


1830-80 


Lake 


CI 


1870 


12 


1870-80 


Lauderdale 


Dl 


1835 


25 


1840-80 


Lawrence 


D3 


1817 


29 


1820-80 


Lewis 


D3 


1843 


6 


1850-80 


Lincoln 


D4 


1809 


26 


1820-80 


Loudon 


B2 


1871 


23 


1880 


McMinn 


B2 


1819 


32 


1830-80 


McNairy 


D2 


1823 


20 


1830-80 


Macon 


Al 


1842 


14 


1850-80 


Madison 


D2 


1821 


60 


1830-80 


Marion 


Bl 


1817 


21 


1830-80 


Marshall 


D3 


1836 


18 


1840-80 



Parent County County Seat 

Roane Pikeville 

Knox Maryville 

Indian Lands Cleveland 

Anderson, Claiborne Jacksboro 

Coffee, Warren, Wilson Woodbury 

Western District Huntingdon 

Formerly Carteret Elizabethton 

Davidson, Dickson, 

Montgomery Ashland City 

Hardeman, Madison, 

Henderson Henderson 

Grainger, Hawkins Tazewell 

Jackson, Overton Celina 

Jefferson, Bedford, Warren Newport 

Franklin Manchester 

Dyer, Madison, Gibson Alamo 

Bledsoe, Morgan, Roane Crossville 

Washington Nashville 

Perry Decaturville 

Cannon, Warren, White Smithville 

Montgomery, Robertson Charlotte 

Western District Dyersburg 

Shelby, Hardeman Somerville 

Morgan, Overton Jamestown 

Bedford, Warren Winchester 

Western District Trenton 

Maury Pulaski 

Hawkins, Knox Rutledge 

Washington Greenville 

Coffee, Warren Altamont 

Grainger, Hawkins Morristown 

Rhea Chattanooga 

Claiborne, Hawkins Sneedville 

Western District Bolivar 

Western District Savannah 

Sullivan Rogersville 

Western District Brownsville 

Western District Lexington 

Western District Paris 

Dickson Centervflle 

Dickson, Stewart Erin 

Stewart, Smith Waverly 

Smith Gainesboro 

Greene, Hawkins Dandridge 

Carter Mountain City 

Greene, Hawkins Knoxville 

Obion Tiptonville 

Dyer, Tipton Ripley 

Hickman, Maury Lawrenceburg 

Hickman, Maury, Wayne, 

Lawrence Hohenwald 

Bedford Fayetteville 

Blount, Monroe, Roane Loudon 

Indian Lands Athen 

Hardin Selmer 

Smith, Sumner Lafayette 

Western District Jackson 

Indian Lands Jasper 

Bedford, Lincoln : Lewisburg 



TENNESSEE 



147 











Census 




Map 


Date 


Pop. 


Reports 


Name 


Index 


Formed 


By M 


Available 


Maury 


D3 


1807 


40 


1820-80 


Meigs 


B2 


1836 


6 


1840-80 


Monroe 


B2 


1819 


25 


1830-80 


Montgomery C3 


1796 


44 


1820-80 


Moore 


D4 


1871 


4 


1880 


Morgan 


A2 


1817 


16 


1830-80 


Obion 


C2 


1823 


29 


1830-80 


Overton 


A2 


1806 


18 


1820-80 


Perry 


D3 


1818 


6 


1820-80 


Pickett 


A2 


1879 


5 


1880 


Polk 


B2 


1839 


14 


1840-80 


Putnam 


A2 


1842 


30 


1860-80 


Rhea 


B2 


1807 


16 


1830-80 


Roane 


B2 


1801 


32 


1830-80 


Robertson 


C3 


1796 


27 


1820-80 


Rutherford 


C4 


1803 


41 


1810-80 


Scott 


A2 


1849 


17 


1850-80 


Sequatchie 


B2 


1857 


6 


1860-80 



Parent County County Seat 

Williamson Columbia 

Hamilton, McMinn, Rhea Decatur 

Roane Madisonville 

Tennessee Clarksville 

Bedford, Franklin Lynchburg 

Roane Wartburg 

Western District Union City 

Jackson Livingston 

Hickman Linden 

Fentress, Overton Byrdstown 

Bradley, McMinn Benton 

Smith, White, DeKalb Cookeville 

Roane Dayton 

Knox Kingston 

Tennessee Springfield 

Davidson Murfreesboro 

Fentress, Morgan, Anderson .... Huntsville 
Hamilton Dunlap 



County Map of Tennessee 




148 



THIRD EDITION OF THE HANDY BOOK FOR GENEALOGISTS 



Name 



Census 
Map Date Pop. Reports 

Index Formed By M Available 



Sevier 


B3 


1794 


23 


1830-80 


Shelby 


Dl 


1819 


482 


1820-80 


Smith 


Al 


1799 


14 


1820-80 


Stewart 


C3 


1803 


9 


1820-80 


Sullivan 


A4 


1779 


95 


1830-80 


Sumner 


C4 


1786 


34 


1820-80 


Tennessee 




1788 






Tipton 


Dl 


1823 


30 


1830-80 


Trousdale 


C4 


1870 


5 


1880 


Unicoi 


A4 


1875 


16 


1880 


Union 


A3 


1850 


9 


1860-80 


Van Buren 


B2 


1840 


4 


1850-80 


Warren 


Bl 


1807 


22 


1820-80 


Washington 


A4 


1777 


60 


1830-80 


Wayne 


D3 


1819 


14 


1820-80 


Weakley 


C2 


1823 


28 


1830-80 


White 


A2 


1806 


16 


1820-80 


Williamson 


C3 


1799 


24 


1820-80 


Wilson 


C4 


1799 


26 


1820-80 



Parent County County Seat 

Jefferson Sevierville 

Hardin Memphis 

Sumner Carthage 

Montgomery Dover 

Washington Blountville 

Davidson Gallatin 

Co. surrendered name when state 

became Tennessee 1796 

Western District Covington 

Macon, Smith, Wilson Hartsville 

Center, Washington Erwm 

Anderson, Campbell Maynardville 

Bledsoe, Warren, White Spencer 

White McMinnville 

Covered present state. Many 

counties from section Jonesboro 

Hickman Waynesboro 

Western District Dresden 

Smith Sparta 

Franklin Franklin 

Sumner Lebanon 



Texas 



Capital, Austin 



Texas is sprawling over a larger terri- 
tory than any other state in the Union. 
It has been under jurisdiction of six 
separate governments since 1685, those 
of France, Spain, Mexico, the Republic 
of Texas, the Confederacy, and the 
United States. 

In 1820 the white settlers of Texas 
could be counted in four digits. Shortly 
afterwards, former residents of Ala- 
bama, Louisiana, Mississippi, and Ten- 
nessee were brought into the section 
under the leadership of Moses Austin 
and his son, Stephen. By 1830 more than 
20,000 Americans had become tillers 
of the Texas soil. 

The predominating nationalities repre- 
sented in Texas are Germany, Czech- 
oslovakia, Italy, Russia, Sweden, Aus- 
tria, Ireland, Greece, France, Norway, 
Denmark, and Hungary. 

Austin has been the capital of Texas 
since statehood. Other cities which have 
been the capitals of Texas are Sen 
Felip de Austin, Washington-on-the-Bra- 
zos, Harrisburg, Galveston, Velasco and 
Columbia during the Revolution, 1835, 
1836; Houston, 1837-1839; Austin, 1839; 
Houston, Washington - on - the - Brazos, 
1842-1845; Austin since 1845. 

The State Historical Society in Austin 



has many records of value to the gen- 
ealogist. Among the public libraries with 
genealogical sections are those in San 
Antonio, Dallas, Houston, and Fort 
Worth. There are collections of material 
in the museum libraries of the Daugh- 
ters of the Republic of Texas, and the 
United Daughters of the Confederacy, 
both of which are in the Old Land 
Office Building, Austin 11, Texas. The 
Archives section of the Texas State Li- 
brary, State Capital, Austin 11, Texas, 
is a relatively large proportion of the 
library's holdings. The Museum Library 
of San Jacinto Monument has a collec- 
tion of earlier' and colonial period pub- 
lications. The Cody Memorial Library, 
Southwestern University, Georgetown, 
Texas, and the Rosenberg Library in 
Galveston also cater to researchers. 

Other Texas Libraries — Amarillo, 
(Potter), Amarillo Public Library, City 
Auditorium; Austin, (Travis), Austin 
Public Library, 401 W. 9th St.; Texas 
State Library & Historical Commission, 
State Capital; The University of Texas, 
Mirabeau B. Lamar Library, (Texas His- 
tory); Beaumont, (Jefferson), Tyrrell 
Public Library, Pearl and Forsythe; 
Dallas, (Dallas), Dallas Historical So- 
ciety Library, Hall of Records; Dallas 



TEXAS 



149 



Public Library, Commerce and Harwood 
Sts.; El Paso, (El Paso), El Paso Pub- 
lic Library, (Southwest); Fort Worth, 
(Tarrant), Fort Worth Public Library, 
Ninth & Throckmorton Sts., (Southwest- 
ern History); Galveston, (Galveston), 
Rosenberg Public Library, 823 Tremont; 
Houston, (Harris), Harris County Pub- 
lic Library, 1223 Elder St. ; Houston Pub- 
lic Library, 500 McKinney Ave.; San 
Antonio, (Bexar), San Antonio Public 
Library, 210 W. Market St.; Waco, (Mc- 
Lennan), Baylor University Library, 
(Texas History); Waco, Public Library. 
The Bureau of Vital Statistics, Texas 
State Department of Health, Austin, 



Texas, has birth and death records from 
1903 to the present, and delayed birth 
records from about 1850 to 1951, includ- 
ing voluntary registrations made during 
and since 1929 for births not registered 
at time of events. The City Clerk of 
the city, or the County Clerk of the 
county may have birth or death records 
prior to 1903. 

The County Clerk of each county is 
custodian of other material of interest 
to the genealogical researcher. 

Johnson, Sid S. Texans Who Wore the 
Gray. Names and deeds of the men who 
fought for the South in the war between 
the states. 



Texas County Histories 

(Population figures to nearest thousand, 1950 Census) 



Name 



Census 
Map Date Pop. Reports 

Index Formed By M Available 



Anderson 


B2 


1846 


32 


1850-80 


Andrews 


E2 


1876 


5 


1880 


Angelina 


A2 


1846 


36 


1850-80 


Aransas 


B4 


1871 


4 


1880 


Archer 


CI 


1858 


7 


1880 


Armstrong 


Fl 


1876 


2 


1880 


Atascosa 


C4 


1856 


20 


1860-80 


Austin 


B3 


1835 


15 


1850-80 


Bailey 


El 


1876 


8 


1880 


Bandera 


C3 


1856 


4 


1860-80 


Bastrop 


B3 


1837 


20 


1850-80 


Baylor 


CI 


1859 


7 


1880 


Bee 


B4 


1857 


18 


1860-80 


Bell 


B2 


1850 


74 


1860-80 


Bexar C3 


Bef. 


1835 


500 


1850-80 


Blanco 


C3 


1858 


4 


1870-80 


Borden 


D2 


1876 


1 


1880 


Bosque 


C2 


1854 


12 


1860-80 


Bowie 


Al 


1840 


62 


1850-80 


Brazoria 


A3 


1837 


47 


1850-80 


Brazos 


B3 


1841 


38 


1850-80 


Brewster 


E3 


1887 


7 




Briscoe 


F2 


1876 


4 




Brooks 


F4 


1911 


9 




Brown 


C2 


1856 


29 


1860-80 


Burelson 


B3 


1846 


13 


1850-80 


Burnet 


C3 


1852 


10 


1860-80 


Caldwell 


B3 


1848 


19 


1850-80 


Calhoun 


B4 


1846 


9 


1850-80 


Callahan 


C2 


1877 


9 


1880 


Cameron 


E4 


1848 


125 


1850-80 


Camp 


Al 


1874 


9 




Carson 


Fl 


1876 


7 




Cass 


Al 


1871 


27 


1850-80 


Castro 


F2 


1876 


5 




Chambers 


A3 


1858 


8 


1860-80 


Cherokee 


A2 


1846 


39 


1850-80 


Childress 


E2 


1876 


12 





Parent County County Seat 

Huston Palestine 

Bexar Andrews 

Nacogdoches Lufkin 

Refugio Rockport 

Fannin Archer City 

Bexar Claude 

Bexar Jourdanton 

Old Mexican Municipality Belleville 

Bexar Muleshoe 

Uvalde Bandera 

Old Mexican Municipality Bastrop 

Fannin Seymour 

Goliad, Refugio Beeville 

Bexar Belton 

Old Mexican Municipality .... San Antonio 

Gillespie, Comal Johnson City 

Bexar Gail 

McLennan Meridian 

Red River Boston 

Old Mexican Municipality Angelton 

Washington Bryan 

Presidio Alpine 

Bexar Silverton 

Starr, Zapata Falfurrias 

Caldwell Brownwood 

Milam, Washington Caldwell 

Travis Burnet 

Gonzales Lockhart 

Victoria Port Lavaca 

Milam, Travis Baird 

Nueces Brownsville 

Upshur Pittsburg 

Bexar Panhandle 

Formerly Davis Linden 

Wheeler Dimmitt 

Jefferson, Liberty Anahuac 

Nacogdoches Rusk 

Bexar, Fannin Childress 



150 



THIRD EDITION OF THE HANDY BOOK FOR GENEALOGISTS 



Name 



Census 
Map Date Pop. Reports 

Index Formed By M Available 



Clay 


CI 


1857 


10 


1860-80 


Cochran 


El 


1876 


6 




Coke 


D2 


1889 


4 




Coleman 


C2 


1858 


16 


1870-80 


Collin 


Bl 


1846 


42 


1850-80 


Collingsworth El 


1876 


9 




Colorado 


B3 


1835 


18 


1850-80 


Comal 


C3 


1846 


16 


1850-80 


Comanche 


C2 


1856 


16 


1860-80 


Concho 


C2 


1858 


5 




Cooke 


Bl 


1848 


22 


1850-80 


Coryell 


C2 


1854 


16 


1860-80 


Cottle 


Dl 


1876 


6 




Crane 


E2 


1887 


4 




Crockett 


D3 


1875 


4 




Crosby 


Dl 


1909 


10 




Culberson 


E2 


1911 


2 




Dallam 


Fl 


1876 


8 




Dallas 


B2 


1846 


615 


1850-80 


Dawson 


D2 


1876 


19 


1860-80 


Deaf Smith 


Fl 


1876 


9 




Delta 


Bl 


1870 


9 




Denton 


Bl 


1846 


41 


1850-80 


DeWitt 


B3 


1846 


23 


1850-80 


Dickens 


Dl 


1876 


7 




Dimmit 


C4 


1880 


11 




Donley 


El 


1876 


6 




Duval 


F4 


1858 


16 


1870-80 


Eastland 


C2 


1858 


24 


1860-80 


Ector 


E2 


1891 


42 




Edwards 


D3 


1858 


3 




Ellis 


B2 


1849 


46 


1850-80 


El Paso 


F2 


1850 


195 


1860-80 


Erath 


C2 


1856 


18 


1860-80 


Falls 


B2 


1850 


27 


1860-80 


Fannin 


Bl 


1837 


31 


1850-80 


Fayette 


B3 


1837 


24 


1850-80 


Fisher 


D2 


1876 


11 


1880 


Floyd 


Dl 


1890 


11 




Foard 


CI 


1891 


4 




Fort Bend 


B3 


1837 


31 


1850-80 


Franklin 


Al 


1875 


6 




Freestone 


B2 


1851 


16 


1860-80 


Frio 


C4 


1858 


10 


1860-80 


Gaines 


E2 


1876 


9 




Galveston 


A3 


1838 


113 


1850-80 


Garza 


Dl 


1876 


6 




Gillespie 


C3 


1848 


11 


1850-80 


Glasscock 


D2 


1893 


1 




Goliad 


B4 


1837 


6 


1850-80 


Gonzales 


B3 


1837 


21 


1850-80 


Gray 


El 


1876 


25 




Grayson 


Bl 


1846 


70 


1850-80 


Gregg 


A2 


1873 


61 




Grimes 


B3 


1846 


15 


1850-80 


Guadalupe 


C3 


1846 


25 


1850-80 


Hale 


Dl 


1876 


28 




Hall 


E2 


1890 


11 




Hamilton 


C2 


1858 


11 


1860-80 



Parent County County Seat 

Cooke Henrietta 

Bexar Morton 

Tom Green Robert Lee 

Travis Coleman 

Fannin McKinney 

Bexar, Fannin Wellington 

Old Mexican Municipality Columbus 

Bexar, Gonzales New Braunfels 

Bosque, Coryell Comanche 

Bexar Paint Rock 

Fannin Gainesville 

Bell, McLennan Gatesville 

Fannin Paducah 

Tom Green Crane 

Bexar Ozona 

Garza Crosbyton 

El Paso Van Horn 

Bexar Dalhart 

Nacogdoches Dallas 

Bexar Lamesa 

Bexar Hereford 

Lamar Cooper 

Fannin Denton 

Golia, Gonzales Cuero 

Bexar Dickens 

Bexar, Maveric Carrizo Springs 

Bexar Clarendon 

Live Oak, Starr, Neuces San Diego 

Bosque, Corvell, Travis Eastland 

Tom Green Odessa 

Bexar Rocksprings 

Navarro Waxahachie 

Old Santa Fe El Paso 

Bosque, Coryell Stephenville 

Limestone, Milam Marlin 

Red River Bonham 

Bastrop, Colorado La Grange 

Bexar Roby 

Bexar Flcydada 

Knox, King Crowell 

Austin Richmond 

Titus Mt. Vernon 

Limestone Fairfield 

Bexar, Uvalde Pearsall 

Bexar Seminole 

Brazoria Galveston 

Bexar Post 

Bexar Fredricksburg 

Tom Green Garden City 

Old Mexican Municipality Goliad 

Old Mexican Municipality Gonzales 

Bexar Pampa 

Fannin Sherman 

Rusk, Upshur Longview 

Montgomery Anderson 

Bexar, Gonzales Seguin 

Bexar Plainview 

Bexar Memphis 

Bosque, Comanche Hamilton 



TEXAS 



151 



Name 



Census 
Map Date Pop. Reports 

Index Formed By M Available Parent County County Seat 

Bexar Spearman 

Fannin Quanah 

1860-80 Jefferson, Liberty Kountze 

1850-80 Formerly Harrisburg 

Municipality Houston 

1850-80 Shelby Marshall 

Bexar Channing 

Fannin, Milam Haskell 

1850-80 Travis San Marcos 

Bexar Canadian 

1850-80 Houston Athens 

1860-80 Cameron Edinburg 

1860-80 Navarro Hillsboro 

Bexar Levelland 

1870-80 Johnson Granbury 

1850-80 Lamar, Nacogdoches .— Sulpher Springs 

1850-80 Nacogdoches Crockett 

Bexar Big Spring 

El Paso Sierra Blanca 

1850-80 Fannin, Nacogdoches Greenville 

Bexar Stinnett 

Tom Green Metzon 

1860-80 Cooke Jacksboro 

1850-80 Old Mexican Municipality Edna 

1850-80 Old Mexican Municipality Jasper 

Presidio Fort Davis 

1850-80 Old Mexican Municipality Beaumont 

Brooks, Dubai Hebbronville 

Nueces Alice 

1860-80 McLennan, Navarro Cleburne 

Bexar, Bosque Anson 

1860-80 Goliad Karnes City 

1850-80 Henderson Kaufman 

1870-80 Kerr Boerne 

Sarita 

Bexar Clairemont 

1860-80 Bexar Kerrville 

1870-80 Bexar Junction 

Fannin Guthrie 

1860-80 Bexar Brackettville 

Nueces Kingsville 

Fannin Benjamin 

1850-80 Red River Paris 

Bexar Olton 

1860-80 Bell, Travis Lampasas 

1870-80 Bexar, Webb CotuUa 

1850-80 Colorado, Victoria, Jackson .... Hallettsville 

Bastrop, Colorado Giddings 

1850-80 Robertson Centerville 

1850-80 Bexar Liberty 

1850-80 Robertson Groesbeck 

Bexar Lipscomb 

1860-80 Nueces George West 

1860-30 Bexar Llano 

Tom Green Mentone 

Bexar Lubbock 

Bexar Tahoka 

1870-80 Bexar Brady 

1860-80 Milam, Robertson, Navarro Waco 

1870-80 Bexar. Live Oak Tilden 



Hansford 


Fl 


1876 


4 


Hardeman 


CI 


1858 


10 


Hardin 


A3 


1858 


20 


Harris 


A3 


1837 


807 


Harrison 


A2 


1839 


48 


Hartley 


Fl 


1876 


2 


Haskell 


CI 


1858 


14 


Hays 


C3 


1847 


18 


Hemphill 


El 


1876 


4 


Henderson 


B2 


1846 


23 


Hidalgo 


F4 


1852 


160 


Hill 


B2 


1853 


31 


Hockley 


El 


1876 


20 


Hood 


C2 


1865 


5 


Hopkins 


Bl 


1846 


23 


Houston 


A2 


1837 


23 


Howard 


D2 


1876 


27 


Hudspeth 


F2 


1917 


4 


Hunt 


Bl 


1846 


43 


Hutchinson 


Fl 


1876 


32 


Irion 


D2 


1889 


2 


Jack 


CI 


1857 


8 


Jackson 


B4 


1836 


13 


Jasper 


A2 


1835 


20 


Jeff Davis 


E3 


1887 


2 


Jefferson 


A3 


1836 


195 


Jim Hogg 


F4 


1913 


5 


Jim Wells 


E4 


1911 


28 


Johnson 


B2 


1845 


31 


Jones 


C2 


1881 


22 


Karnes 


B4 


1921 


17 


Kaufman 


B2 


1848 


31 


Kendall 


C3 


1862 


5 


Kenedy 


E4 




.6 


Kent 


Dl 


1876 


2 


Kerr 


C3 


1856 


14 


Kimble 


C3 


1858 


5 


King 


Dl 


1876 


.8 


Kinney 


D3 


1874 


3 


Kleberg 


E4 


1913 


22 


Knox 


CI 


1858 


10 


Lamar 


Bl 


1840 


43 


Lamb 


El 


1876 


20 


Lampasas 


C2 


1856 


10 


La Salle 


C4 


1858 


7 


Lavaca 


B3 


1846 


22 


Lee 


B3 


1874 


10 


Leon 


B2 


1846 


12 


Liberty 


A3 


1837 


27 


Limestone 


B2 


1846 


25 


Lipscomb 


El 


1875 


4 


Live Oak 


C4 


1856 


9 


Llano 


C3 


1856 


5 


Loving 


E2 


1887 


.2 


Lubbock 


Dl 


1876 


101 


Lynn 


Dl 


1876 


11 


McCulloch 


C2 


1856 


12 


McLennan 


B2 


1850 


130 


McMullen 


C4 


1858 


1 



152 



THIRD EDITION OF THE HANDY BOOK FOR GENEALOGISTS 



Name 



Census 
Map Date Pop. Reports 

Index Formed By M Available 



Madison 


B2 


1853 


8 


1860-80 


Marion 


Al 


1860 


10 


1860-80 


Martin 


D2 


1876 


6 




Mason 


C3 


1858 


5 


1860-80 


Matagorda 


B4 


1837 


22 


1850-80 


Maverick 


D4 


1871 


12 


1860-80 


Medina 


03 


1848 


17 


1850-80 


Menard 


C3 


1858 


4 


1870-80 


Midland 


D2 


1885 


26 




Milam 


03 


1835 


24 


1850-80 


Mills 


02 


1887 


6 




Mitchell 


D2 


1876 


14 




Montague 


01 


1857 


17 


1860-80 


Montgomery B3 


1837 


25 


1850-80 


Moore 


Fl 


1876 


13 




Morris 


Al 


1875 


9 




Motley 


Dl 


1876 


4 




Nacogdoches A2 


1837 


30 


1850-80 


Navarro 


B2 


1846 


40 


1850-80 


Newton 


A2 


1846 


11 


1850-80 


Nolan 


D2 


1876 


20 




Nueces 


E4 


1846 


165 


1850-80 


Ochiltree 


El 


1876 


6 




Oldham 


Fl 


1876 


2 




Orange 


A3 


1852 


41 


1860-80 


Palo Pinto 


02 


1856 


17 


1860-80 


Panola 


A2 


1846 


19 


1850-80 


Parker 


02 


1855 


22 


1860-80 


Parmer 


F2 


1876 


6 




Pecos 


E3 


1871 


10 




Polk 


A3 


1846 


16 


1850-80 


Potter 


Fl 


1876 


73 




Presidio 


E3 


1850 


7 


1860-70 


Rains 


Bl 


1870 


4 




Randall 


Fl 


1876 


14 




Reagan 


D2 


1903 


3 




Real 


03 


1913 


2 




Red River 


Al 


1835 


22 


1850-80 


Reeves 


E2 


1883 


12 




Refugio 


B4 


1836 


10 


1850-80 


Roberts 


El 


1837 


1 




Robertson 


B2 


1876 


20 


1850-80 


Rockwall 


Bl 


1873 


6 




Runnells 


02 


1911 


17 




Rusk 


A2 


1843 


42 


1850-80 


Sabine 


A2 


1836 


9 


1850-80 


San 










Augustine A2 


1835 


9 


1850-80 


San Jacinto 


A3 


1870 


7 




San Patricio B4 


1835 


36 


1850-80 


San Saba 


02 


1856 


9 


1860-80 


Schleicher 


D3 


1887 


3 




Scurry 


D2 


1876 


23 




Shackelford 


02 


1856 


5 


1860-80 


Shelby 


A2 


1836 


23 


1850-80 


Sherman 


Fl 


1876 


2 




Smith 


A2 


1846 


75 


1850-80 


Somervell 


02 


1875 


3 




Starr 


F4 


1848 


14 


1850-80 



Parent County County Scat 

Leon Madisonville 

Cass Jefferson 

Bexar Stanton 

Bexar .... Mason 

Old Mexican Municipality Bay City 

Kennedy Eagle Pass 

Bexar Hondo 

Bexar Menard 

Tom Green Midland 

Old Mexican Municipality Cameron 

Brown, Hamilton Goldthwaite 

Bexar Colorado City 

Cooke Montague 

Washington Conroe 

Bexar Dumas 

Titus Daingerfield 

Bexar Matador 

Old Mexican Municipality .... Nacogdoches 

Robertson Corsicana 

Jasper Newton 

Bexar Sweetwater 

San Patricio Corpus Christi 

Bexar Perryton 

Bexar Vega 

Jefferson Orange 

Navarro Palo Pinto 

Harrison, Shelby Carthage 

Bosque, Navarro Weatherford 

Bexar Farwell 

Presidio Fort Stockton 

Liberty Livingston 

Bexar Amarillo 

Bexar Marfa 

Hopkins, Hunt Emory 

Bexar Canyon 

Tom Green Big Lake 

Bandera, Kerr Leakey 

Old Mexican Municipality Clarksville 

Pecos Pecos 

Old Mexican Municipality Refugio 

Bexar Miami 

Bexar Franklin 

Kaufman Rockwall 

Coleman Ballinger 

Nacogdoches Henderson 

Old Mexican Municipality Hemphill 

Old Mexican Municipality .. San Augustine 

Liberty Coldspring 

Old Mexican Municipality Sinton 

Bexar San Saba 

Crockett Eldorado 

Bexar Snyder 

Bosque Albany 

Old Mexican Municipality Center 

Bexar Stratford 

Nacogdoches Tyler 

Hood Glen Rose 

Nueces Rio Grande City 



TEXAS 



153 




154 



THIRD EDITION OF THE HANDY BOOK FOR GENEALOGISTS 



Stephens C2 1876 11 1870-80 Bosque Breckenridge 

Sterling D2 1891 1 Tom Green Sterling City- 
Stonewall Dl 1876 4 Fannin Aspermont 

Sutton D3 1870 4 Wood Sonora 

Swisher F2 1876 8 Bexar Tulia 

Tarrant B2 1849 361 il850-80 Navarro Fort Worth 

Taylor C2 1858 63 Bexar Abilene 

Terrell D3 1905 3 Pecos Sanderson 

Terry El 1876 13 Bexar Brownfield 

Throckmorton CI 1858 4 n860-80 Bosque Throckmorton 

Titus Al 1846 17 1850-80 Red River Mt. Pleasant 

Tom Green D2 1875 59 Bexar San Angelo 

Travis B3 1840 161 1850-80 Bastrop Austin 

Trinity A2 1850 10 1860-80 Houston Groveton 

Tyler A3 1846 11 1850-80 Liberty Woodville 

Upshur A2 1846 21 1850-80 Harrison, Nacogdoches Gilmer 

Upton D2 1887 5 Tom Green Rankin 

Uvalde C3 1850 16 1860-80 Bexar Uvalde 

Val Varde D3 1885 17 Crockett. Kinney Del Rio 

Van Zandt B2 1848 23 1850-80 Henderson Canton 

Victoria B4 1837 31 1850-80 Old Mexican Municipality Victoria 

Walker B3 1846 20 1850-80 Huntsville 

Waller B3 1873 12 Austin Hempstead 

Ward E2 1887 13 Tom Green Monahans 

Washington B3 1837 21 1850-80 Texas Municipality Brenham 

Webb F4 1848 56 1850-80 Bexar Laredo 

Wharton B3 1846 36 1850-80 Colorado, Jackson Wharton 

Wheeler El 1876 10 Bexar Wheeler 

Wichita CI 1858 98 Fannin Wichita Falls 

Wilbarger CI 1858 21 Bexar Vernon 

Willacy E4 1911 21 Hidalgo Raymondville 

Williamson B3 1848 39 1850-80 Milam Georgetown 

Wilson C3 1850 15 1870-80 Bexar Floresville 

Winkler E2 1887 10 Tom Green Kermit 

Wise CI 16 1860-80 Cooke Decatur 

Wood B2 1850 21 1860-80 Van Zandt Quitman 

Yoakum El 1876 4 Bexar Plains 

Young CI 1856 17 1860-80 Bosque Graham 

Zapata F4 1858 4 1860-80 Starr, Webb Zapata 

Zavalla C4 1858 11 1860-80 Uvalde, Maverick Crystal City 

1. Tarrant U. S. Census Schedule for 1860 is missing. 

2. Throckmorton U. S. Census Schedule for 1870 missing 

Census schedules available for the following discontinued counties: Buchanan, 
1860; Davis, 1870; Encinal, 1860, 1870. 



Utah 



As the Puritans, the 
Quakers, the Huguenots, and many other 
religious devotees came to the American 



Capital, Salt Lake City 

Pilgrims, the Utah. When 



they came the land was 
barren and desolate, nothing but the 
bluish gray of the sagebrush and grease- 



shore for the opportunity to worship wood covered the land. Not a sign of 
Almighty God according to their con- human life, except here and there, scat- 
science, so the members of the Church tered along the shores of a small lake 
of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, or the banks of a tiny mountain stream, 
or the so-called "Mormons," came to a few Indian wigwams. Not even the 
the then arid forbidding valleys of hoofprints of the horses that carried 



UTAH 155 

Father Escalante and Father Dominguez alogical material. Their microfilm pho- 
on a hurried journey through part of tographers have been working in 22 
the state seventy-one years earlier were states and the District of Columbia in 
anywhere to be found. the U. S, In Europe their activities have 

It was on July 24, 1847, that the colon- taken them to England, Ireland, Scot- 
ization of the Great Salt Lake Basin land, Wales, Isle of Man, Sweden, the 
began with the arrival on the site of Netherlands, Denmark, Finland, Germa- 
the present Salt Lake City of the first ny, Norway, Switzerland, Iceland, France, 
Pioneer group 148 . . . 143 men, three Italy and other countries. They also 
women, and two boys. New groups ar- have many records from Mexico and 
rived several times each month. In Canada. In some of these areas they have 
three years, 1850, there were 11,380; completed the filming of all the birth, 
in 1860, 40,273; in 1870, 86,786; in death and marriage records available to 
1880, 143,963; in 1890, 210,779; in 1900, the public, while in others they are con- 
276,749; in 1910, 373,351; in 1920, 449,398; tinuing the work of gathering and film- 
in 1930, 507,847; in 1940, 550,310; in 1950, ing records of 100 years ago and older. 
688,862. You will also find in their film files the 

Most of the early settlers of Utah U. S. Census Records of 1830, 1840, 1850 
came from New England, Ohio, Illinois, and 1860 generally complete for all 
Missouri, and Canada, and since then states, and part of the 1870 census, 
from almost every state in the Union. Their archives department receives 
Most of the Europeans who have come about 1,000 family group sheets every 
in order of their numerical strength, day from patrons all over the world, 
are English, Germans, Danes, Swedes, These are filed in alphabetic order and 
Norwegians, Swiss, Hollanders .Welsh, and are accessible to researchers. They are 
Scotch, with a sprinkling of Piedmont compiled from information gleaned from 
Italians, and a few Czechs , Many many sources about family groups 
Austrians, Greeks, Mexicans and Ital- (father, mother and children), some of 
ians, not affected by church affiliation, them being truly ancient and others 
have come to work in the mining and still living. Employees of the society 
smelting operations of the state. Only check each sheet and consider them ab- 
about two per cent of the population solutely accurate prior to acceptance, 
are Negroes. Between 2y2 and 3 million family group 

The Division of Vital Statistics, State sheets and 40,000 pedigree sheets are 
Board of Health, Capital Bldg., Salt available for patron's use in this depart- 
Lake City, Utah, has records of births ment. 

since 1890 and deaths since 1848. Mar- According to Archibald F. Bennett, 
riage records are at the offices of the who for years has been executive secre- 
County Clerks. tary of the society, they will do research 

The principal sources of genealogical for anyone so desiring. However, they 
information are the LDS Church records have had such great demands for this 
which have been carefully kept and work in certain localities they are far 
preserved since 1830. Besides that, re- behind in their orders — for instance, 
cords have been gathered for years Swedish research is two years in arrears 
from all over the world and brought because competent help is not available 
to Salt Lake City by the Genealogical The charge tor these services is $1.50 
Society of the Church of Jesus Christ of per hour at this writing. Inquiries should 
Latter-day Saints. be addressed to THE GENEALOGICAL 

The growth of this society has been SOCIETY, 80 North Main St., Salt Lake 
astounding. An increase of over 5,000 City, Utah. 

volumes has been noted in the past three About 95 miles north of Salt Lake 
years, bringing the total to over 55,000. City is located the beautiful Cache Val- 
During that same period they have ac- ley with its principal city, Logan. A 
quired microfilms of unpublished records block east of its business section is the 
equaling 329,000 volumes of 300 pages Cache County Library. One of the im- 
each, almost doubling their microfilm pcrtant departments of that Library is 
acquisitions. They now have a total of the genealogical section, not large, but 
110,454 - 100 ft. rolls of microfilms from choice. It is good enough to elicit from 
foreign countries and 33,934 rolls of a stranger who has visited most of the 
American films with a staggering total important libraries on a leisurely auto 
of 215,868,100 pages of unpublished gene- trip across the nation the remark, "This 



156 



THIRD EDITION OF THE HANDY BOOK FOR GENEALOGISTS 



is the best Genealogical Library I have 
seen between the Mississippi and the 
Pacific, with the exception, of course, 
of your large library in Salt Lake City." 

At the close of 1956 the genealogical 
shelves of the Cache County Library 
held about 8,000 volumes of genealogical 
records from almost every state in the 
Union and many from Great Britain. 
The library is financed by tax money 
equally divided between Cache County 
and Logan City, about $4,500.00 coming 
from each of the two taxing units. In 
past years, the Board of Directors, an 
equal number serving at the pleasure 
of the county and the city commission, 
has alloted from $400 to $450 each year 
for the purchase of books to the gen- 
ealogical department. Merchants of Lo- 
gan have also donated toward the book 
fund. One year they gave more than 
$7,000.00. The book selections are made 
by the voluntary department assistants. 
Many organizations, civic and religious, 
as well as private citizens donate several 
hundred dollars each year toward the 
book fund. When deaths have occured 
in families interested in genealogy, they 
have requested that instead of sending 
flowers money be donated to the library 
for the purchase of genealogical books. 

Unique is the system of assistance 
provided for the researchers. Since 
most of those coming to the library 
to search the records are amateurs, some 
sixty persons have been called as assist- 
ant librarians to aid and advise research- 
ers. They work in pairs. Generally 
they spend from four to seven hours 
each day they are on duty. Some of them 



give one day's service each week, a few 
two days. Their work is entirely gratui- 
tous. No monetary compensation whatso- 
ever is given to any one assisting in the 
genealogical department. Most of these 
aides have given this service for at least 
one year. Several have been there from 
seven to ten years. Some of these aides 
have become more or less expert, es- 
pecially those who have taken special 
studies in research activities. 

The patrons are permitted to select 
from the shelves the books they desire to 
study at the long desks in the depart- 
ment. No books are permitted to be 
taken from the library. A stranger 
coming into the genealogical depart- 
ment, if she is at all acquainted with 
research procedure, is immediately at 
home among the books. 

Any community with an enthusiastic 
genealogists can do for his or her library 
what has been done here. Several years 
ago the late Walter M. Everton, the 
founder of the GENALOGICAL HELP- 
ER and the HANDY BOOK FOR GEN- 
EALOGISTS, opened the genealogical 
section of the Cache County Library. 
He brought with him to the library one 
genealogical book he had purchased some 
time previously. He appealed for books 
from those interested, money from those 
who had no books. He solicited the mer- 
chants of Logan for donations and collect- 
ed about $7,000.00, all of which was spent 
for books. It is mainly through his ef- 
forts and the cooperation of the Board 
of Directors of the library that there 
are now about 8,000 genealogical books 
on the shelves of the department. 



Utah County Histories 

(Population figures to nearest thousand, 1950 Census 



Name 


Map 
Index 


Date 
Formed 


Pop. 
By M 


Census 
Reports 
Available 


Beaver 


El 


1856 


5 


1860-80 


Box Elder 


Al 


1856 


20 


1860-80 


Cache 


A2 


1856 


34 


1860-80 


Carbon 


C3 


1894 


25 




Daggett 
Davis 


B4 
B2 


1917 
1850 


,3 

31 


1850-80 


Duchesne 


C3 


1914 


8 




Emery 
Garfield 


D3 
F3 


1880 
1864 


6 

4 




Grand 


D4 


1892 


2 




Iron 


Fl 


1852 


10 


1850-80 


Juab 


CI 


1849 


6 


1860-80 


Kane 


F2 


1864 


2 


1870-80 


Millard 


Dl 


1852 


9 


1860-80 



Parent County County Seat 

Iron, Millard - Beaver 

Unorganized Territory Brigham 

Unorganized Territory Logan 

Sanpete Price 

Uinta Manila 

Salt Lake Farmington 

Wasatch Duchesne 

Sanpete, Sevier Castle Dale 

Iron, Sevier, Kane Panguitch 

Emery, Uintah Moab 

Unorganized Territory Parowan 

Original county Nephi 

Washington, Unorganized Terr Kanab 

Juab Fillmore 



UTAH 



157 



Name 



Census 
Map Date Pop. Reports 

Index Formed By M Available Parent County 



County Seat 



Morgan B2 1862 3 1870-80 Davis, Summit Morgan 

Piute E2 1866 2 1870-80 Sevier Junction 

Rich A3 1864 2 1870-80 Formerly Richland Randolph 




158 



THIRD EDITION OF THE HANDY BOOK FOR GENEALOGISTS 



Census 
Map Date Pop. Reports 

Name Index Formed By M Available Parent County County Seat 

Salt Lake B2 1849 275 1850-80 Orig. Co. (Great S. L.) .... Salt Lake City 

San Juan F4 1880 5 Kane Monticello 

Sanpete D3 1849 14 1850-80 Original county Manti 

Sevier D2 1864 12 1870-80 Sanpete Richfield 

Summit B3 1854 7 1860-80 Salt Lake Coalville 

Tooele Bl 1849 15 1850-80 Original county Tooele 

Uintah C4 1880 10 Wasatch Vernal 

Utah C2 1849 82 1850-80 Original county Provo 

Wasatch B3 1862 6 1870-80 Summit Heber 

Washington Fl 1852 10 1860-80 Unorganized Territory St. George 

Wayne E3 1864 2 1880 Piute Loa 

Weber A2 1849 83 1850-80 Original County Ogden 

Available Census information from discontinued Utah counties: Carson, 1860, 
1870; Cedar, 1860; Humboldt, 1860, 1870 (See Nevada, vol. 1); Rio Virgin, 1870; 
Saint Marys, 1860. 



Vermont 



Capital, Montpelier 



Vermont was late in getting settled 
as compared with other states in New 
England. One reason was the hostility 
of the French and Indians in the Quebec 
district north of Vermont. As soon as 
the French released all claims on the 
sections within the Ame^^ican colonies, 
security was established and settlers felt 
free to go into the distant and lonely 
Vermont sections. As early as 1724 Eng- 
lish people living along the New Eng- 
land coastline became interested in Ver- 
mont. 

Massachusetts and Connecticut played 
the biggest role in the settling of Ver- 
mont, although people moved from sev- 
eral of the other states to settle the 
communities established in Vermont 
from 1714 on, but mostly between 1740 
and 1800. As mentioned, Connecticut 
and Massachusetts furnished settlers for 
almost every early community in Ver- 
mont, but settlers also came from Can- 
ada, New Hampshire, New York, Rhode 
Island, Maine, and New Jersey. 

French Canadians came into the north- 
ern counties as late as the 1900s. They 
were preceded by several years by the 
Irish. Into the Markham Mountain re- 
gion in southwestern Windsor county 
and the Equinox Mountain section of 
northern Bennington County came many 
farmers from Finland. Welsh came to 
work in the slate quarries in the mid- 
west section of Rutland County. Scotch 
and Italian stone cutters came to the 



quarries southeast of Montpelier. Rus- 
sians, Poles, Czechs, Austrians, and 
Swedes came to the granite quarries of 
Rutland County. About half of the for- 
eign born population of Vermont came 

from Canada. 

The fourteenth state in the Union, 
Vermont was admitted in 1791. The 
slate had a population in 1950 of 
377,747. In 1790 there were 85,425 in- 
habitants. 

Birth, marriage, and death records 
from approximately 1760 until the pre- 
sent time are on file in the office of 
the Secretary of State, Division of Vital 
Records, State House, Montpelier, Ver- 
mont. Each month this office receives 
a group of vital records from the town 
and the county officers. These records 
are genreally about six months in ar- 
rear. It may be well to try the City or 
Town Clerk if the Secretary of State 
does not have the record. 

Wills are recorded in the twenty pro- 
bate districts of the state, with each 
county having one or more probate dis- 
trict. For information write the Regis- 
trar, Probate Court, County Seat. Deeds 
are recorded in 246 Town and fourteen 
County Clerks offices. Land grants are 
on file in the offices of the Town Clerk. 
Census records are available at the State 
Library in Montpelier. Tax payers lists 
are with the Town Clerks. War service 
records are on file in the office of the 
Adjutant General in Montpelier. Ceme- 



VERMONT 159 

tery records are with the church records Shelburne, 1768; St. George, 1784; Un- 
of the sextons. derhill, 1786; Willistown, 1774. 

Carleton, Hiram, Genealogical & Fami- ESSEX, Organized 1797. Bloomfield, 
ly History ol the State o/ Vermont, 2 vols . 1762; Brunswick, 1780; Canaan. 1791; 
Lewis Publishing Co., New York, Chicago. Concord, 1783; Guildhall, 1764; Lunen- 
1903. burg, 1770; Maidstone, 1772; Victory, 

Clark, Byron N., A List of Pensioners of 1781. 
the War of 1812. pub. 1904. FRANKLIN, Organized 1796. Bakers- 

DoDGE, Prentiss Cutler, Encyclopedia, field, 1799; Berkshire, 1780; Enosburgh, 
Vermont Biography, pub.. 1912. 1797; Fairfax, 1783; Fairfield, 1788; 

First Census of the United States, 1790, Fletcher, 1781; Franklin ,1789; Georgia, 
Vermont, Government Printing Office, 1907. 1784-5; Highgate, 1763; Montgomery, 

Goodrich, John E.. Vermont Rolls of the 1780; Richford. 1797; Sheldon, 1790; 
Soldiers in the Revolutionary War, Publish- Swantown, 1787; St. Albans, 1775. 
ed by authority of the Legislature, The GRAND ISLE, Organized 1802. Al- 
Tuttle Co.. Rutland. Vt.. 1904. burgh, 1782; Grand Isle, 1783; Isle la 

Heads of Families, Second Census of the Mott, 1785; North Hero 1783; South 
United States, 1800, State of Vermont, Hero, 1779. 

Published by Vermont Historical Society. LAMOILLE, Organized 1835. Cam- 
Montpelier, Vt., 1938. bridge, 1783; Elmore, 1790; Hyde Park, 

WPA. Bibliography of Research Projects 1787; Johnson, 1784; Morristown, 1790; 
Reports, Check List of Historical Records Sterling, 1799; Stowe, 1793; Waterville, 
Survey Publications, 1940. 1789; Wolcott, 1781. 

Vermont Libraries: Burlington (Chit- ORANGE, Organized 1781. Bradford, 
tenden). University of Vermont and S. 1765; Braintree, S. 1783; Brookfield, 
State (Agricultural) College Libraries, S. 1771; Chelsea, S. 1784; Corinth. O. 
Billings Library, (Vermont), (Civil War); 1777; Fairlee, S. 1766; Newbury, S. 1763; 
Montpelier, (Washington), Vermont Orange, O. 1793; Randolph, O. 1781; 
Free Public Library Commission, State Stratford, S. 1768; Thetford, S. 1764; 
Library Bldg.; Vermont Historical So- Topsham, S. 1781; Turnbridge, S. 1776; 
ciety Library, State House, (History. Vershire, O. 1780; Washington, O. 1785; 
Vermontiana). W. Fairlee, 1761; Williamtown, 1784. 

Vermont Towns Organized Before 1800 ORLEANS, Organized 1797. Barton, 

ADDISON, organized 1785. Addison, 1789; Craftsbury, 1788; Derby, 1795; 
1783; Bridport, 1786; Cornwall, 1774; Glover, 1797; Greensborough, 1789; Hol- 
Ferrisburgh, 1769; Leicester, 1774; Liri- land, 1800; Jay, S. bef. Rev.; Salem, 
coin. 1790; Middlebury, 1766; Monktown, 1798; Westfield. 1790. 
1774; New Haven, 1769; Orwell, 1775; RUTLAND, Organized 1781. Benson, 
Panton, 1764; Ripton, 1781; Salisbury, 1783; Brandon, 1772; Castleton, 1767; 
1774; Shoreham, 1766; Starksborough, Chittenden aft. Rev.; Clarendon, 1768; 
1788; Vergennes, 1764; Waltham, S. bef. Danby, 1765; Fairhaven, 1779; Hubbard- 
Rev.; Weybridge, 1775; Whiting, 1773. ton, 1775; Ira, 1779; Mendon, 1781; 

BENNINGTON, organized 1779 Ar- Middletown, 1774; Mt. Holly, 1787; Mt. 
lington, 1763; Bennington, 1761; Dorset, Tabor, 1761; Pawlet, 1761; Pittsford, 
1768; Glastenbury, 1661; Landgrove, 1767; Poultney, 1777; Rutland, 1769; 
1761; Manchester, 1764; Peru abt. 1773; Sherburn, 1785; Shrewsbury, 1763; Sud- 
Pownal, 1762; Rupert, 1767; Sandgate, bury, bef. Rev.; Tinsmith, 1770; Wall- 
1771; Shaftsbury, 1763; Sunderland, ingsford, 1773; Wells, 1768; West Haven, 
1766; Winhall, 1761. 1770. 

CALEDONIA, Organized 1796. Barnet, WASHINGTON, Organized 1810. Barre, 
1770; Burke, 1790; Cabot, 1785; Dan- 1780; Berlin 1785; Calais, 1787; Dux- 
ville, 1785; Groton, 1787; Hardwick, 1790; bury, 1786; Payston, 1798; Marshfield, 
Kirby, 1799; Lyndon, 1788; Peacham, 1782; Middlesex, 1787; Montpelier, 1786; 
1775; Ryegate, 1774; Sheffield, 1792; St. Moretown, 1790; Northfield, 1785; Plains- 
Johnsbury, 1786; Sutton, 1791; Walden, field, 1794; Roxbury, 1789; Waitsfield, 
1789; Waterford, 1797; Wheelock, 1785. 1789; Warren, 1797; Waterbury, 1784; 

CHITTENDEN, Organized 1787. Bol- Worcester, 1797. 
ton, 1763; Burlington, 1773; Charlotte, WINDHAM, 1781. Athens, 1780; Brat- 
1776; Colchester, 1772; Essex, 1783; tleboro, 1724; Brookline, 1777; Dover, 
Hinesburg ,1774; Huntington, 1786; Jer- 1780; Grafton, 1768; Guilford, 1761; Hal- 
icho, 1774; Milton, 1783; Richmond, 1775; if ax, 1761; Jamacia, 1780; Londonderry, 



160 



THIRD EDITION OF THE HANDY BOOK FOR GENEALOGISTS 



1773; Marlborough, 1763; Newfane, 1766; water, 1779; Cavendish, 1769; Chester, 

Putney, 1744; Rockingham, 1753; Town- 1764; Hartford, 1763; Hartland, 1763; 

send, 1761; Woodborough, 1780; West- Ludlow, 1714; Norwich, 1762; Plymouth, 

minister, 1741; Whitington, 1771; Wil- 1777; Pomfret, 1770; Reading, 1772; Roy- 

mington S. bef. Rev.; Windham, 1773. alton, 1771; Sharon, 1764; Springfield, 

WINDSOR, Organized before State- 1761; Stockbridge, 1784; Weathersfield, 

hood. Andover, 1776; Baltimore, 1794; 1761; Weston, 1790; Windsor, 1764; 

Barnard, 1774; Bethel, 1779; Bridge- Woodstock, 1768. 



County Map of Vermont 







^-8& S "W I/^ZS^^ 



M JL ft Ji A 



»r-o jP'r"^""! — 5 



VERMONT 



161 



Vermont County Histories 

^Population figures to nearest thousand, 1950 Census) 



Name 



Census 
Map Date Pop. Reports 

Index Formed By M Available 



Addison 


Bl 


1785 


19 


1790-80 


Bennington 


Dl 


1779 


24 


1790-80 


Caledonia 


B3 


1792 


24 


1800-80 


Chittenden 


Bl 


1787 


63 


1790-80 


Essex 


A3 


1792 


6 


1800-80 


Franklin 


Al 


1792 


30 


1800-80 


Grand Isle 


Al 


1802 


3 


1810-80 


Lamoille 


A2 


1835 


11 


1840-80 


Orange 


B2 


1781 


17 


1790-80 


Orleans 


A2 


1792 


21 


1800-80 


Rutland 


CI 


1781 


46 


1790-80 


Washington 


B2 


1810 


43 


1820-80 


Windham 


D2 


1779 


29 


1790-80 


Windsor 


C2 


1781 


44 


1790-80 



Parent County County Seat 

Rutland Middlebury 

Original county Manchester 

Bennington 
Newly Organized Territory .. St. Johnsbury 

Original county Burlington 

Unorganized Territory Guildhall 

Chittenden St. Albans 

Franklin North Hero 

Chittenden Hyde Park 

Original county Chelsea 

Original county Newport 

Original county Rutland 

Addison, Orange Montpelier 

Bennington Newfane 

Original county Woodstock 



Virginia 



Capital, Richmond 



The colonization of the American con- 
tinent in modern times began with the 
arrival of three boatloads of English 
immigrants in May, 1607 on the north- 
east shore of James River in the pre- 
sent Virginia. 

One of the leaders was Captain John 
Smith, a daring adventurous fellow 
with an inquisitive mind who had been 
in many tight situations on the out- 
skirts of civilization. With a score of 
companions, he sailed into several of 
the many bays and river openings along 
the zigzagging east coast, and thus be- 
came acquainted with the lay of the 
land. 

Having done nothing to provide food 
for the winter, more than half of the 
colony succumbed from illness and lack 
of nourishing food. 

The summer of 1608 brought them 
new supplies from England and 120 
more immigrants. 

In the fall of 1608 the colony of 130 
or 140 persons was augmented by the 
arrival of seventy more immigrants in 
the third expedition to Virginia. 

At the beginning of the winter of 
1609 the colony consisted of 490 per* 
sons. When the spring of 1610 arrived 
there were only 60 persons left in the 
colony. 

Determined to return to England, the 



group embarked. The ship was coming 
out of the mouth of the James River 
when Virginia bound ships under the 
command of Lord Delaware came in 
sight. Against their own judgment, the 
disgruntled colonists were persuaded to 
return to their abandoned homes. 

Early in 1610 more food and additional 
colonists arrived from England. 

Virgina became a royal colony in 
1624. From then until 1776, when it 
announced its independence, it was in 
almost constant trouble with the Crown 
or its representatives. Mainly, the col- 
onists objected to the arbitrary action 
of the colony officials and their ruthless 
demands. 

Every month in the year, with the ex- 
ception of the winter months, saw boat- 
loads of new immigrants arriving. More 
and more settlements were established, 
some as far north as the Potomac River. 
By 1700 there were more than 80,000 
persons living in the Tidewater region 
of Virginia. Twenty thousand more had 
come by 1717. During the next 37 years, 
the population increased by almost two 
hundred per cent, reaching 284,000 by 
1754. 

Even before that time the settlers 
had scattered over the coastal plain, 
the Piedmont plateau, and had crossed 
over the Blue Ridge highlands and set- 



162 THIRD EDITION OF THE HANDY BOOK FOR GENEALOGISTS 

Ited in the Valley of Virginia, with the books may be obtained at a reasonable 

Appalachian Plateau at their back, price. The library has Parish Registers 

There they had settled along the rivers, and Vestry Books from 1618 to 1860. 

hundreds of miles from the coast line. Not that all of those records are from 

As early as 1730 there had been a that period, but somewhere within that 
heavy immigration from Pennsylvania span of time. The exact records avail- 
into Virginia of Scotch-Irish, Welsh, and able are published in Bennett's "Me- 
Gcrmans, most of whom settled in the thods of Tacing Pedigrees," Lesson 13, 
upper valleys. Naturally, therefore, it page 5. (This is a mimeographed book- 
was in that section where flourished leL, stapled at top, and printed on sheets 
the Welsh Baptist Church, the English SH-xM.) 

Quakers, and the Scotch Presbyterian.^. The State Bureau of Vital Statistics, 

Methodist ahurches were established Richmond, Va., has birth and death re- 

about 1800. cords from 1853 to 1896, and after 1912. 

Virginia was well settled by 1775. Marriage records are available from 
By 1800 it had upwards of 90 counties 1853 to the present. Some marriage 
and a population of nearly a million. bonds are in the State Library, Rich- 
Nine other states had preceded Vir- mond, Va., others are in the office of 
ginia into the Union when she entered the Clerk of the Court or city in which 
in June 1788. In the first three U. S. the marriage took place. Several of the 
Census reports, 1790, 1800, 1810, Vir- so-called independent cities have their 
ginia registered the highest population own records of birth and deaths. Inquire 
in the nation. In 1820 she was second at the City Board of Health office, 
to New York. In 1830 she was surpassed The Virginia Land Office, State Cap- 
by New York and Pennsylvania. ital, Richmond, Va., has land patents or 

Foreign born residents predominate grants since 1620. Numerous volumes 

in the following order in Virginia: Rus- exist. The entries in these patent books 

sians, English, Germans, Italians, Greeks, are indexed in one volume, but each 

Polish, Czechs, Irish, Austrians and Hun- book is indexed independently of the 

garians. others. 

Until 1686 the Episcopal Church wa.s Virginia's independant cities are Al- 
the state church in Virginia. All child- exandria, Bristol, Buena Vista, Char- 
ren, regardless of religious affiliation, lottesville, Clifton Forge, Colonial 
were required to be baptized by the min- Heights, Danville, Falls Church, Fred- 
isters of that church. Dates of their ericksburg, Hampton, Harrisonburg, 
baptism, together with their names, Hopewell, Lynchburg, Martinsville, New- 
dates of birth, and names of their par- port News, Norfolk, Petersburg, Ports- 
ents were recorded in the parish reg- mouth, Radford. Richmond, Roanoke, 
isters. The same information was taken South Norfolk, Stauton, Suffolk, Waynes- 
of all marriages and burials. All of boro, Williamsburg and Winchester, 
these church records are preserved, Virginia libraries — Charlottesville, 
some are printed. They are available (Albemarle), University of Virginia, Al- 
in the Virginia State Library in Rich- derman Library, (Virginiana) ; Danville, 
mond. (Pittsylvania), Danville Public Library, 

The Quit Rent list is used as a Cen- 975 Main St.; Fredricksburg, (Spotsyl- 
sus Report or Schedule. In 1704 all Vir- vania), Mary Washington College of the 
ginia landowners, except those in Lan- University of Virginia, E. Lee Trinkle 
caster, Northumberland, Westmoreland, Library, (Virginiana, American History) ; 
Richmond and Stafford counties, had to Lexington, (Rockbridge), Virginia Mili- 
pay to the king a Quit Rent of one tary Institute, Preston Library, (Con- 
shilling for each fifty acres bought. federate History); Norfolk, (Norfolk), 

Since the 1790 U. S. Census records Norfolk Public Library, 345 W. Free- 

were destroyed in a fire, Fothergill and mason St., (local history); Richmond, 

Naugle in 'Taxpayers of Virginia" have (Henrico), Richmond Public Library, 

tried to augment similar lists gathered 101 E. Franklin St.; Union Theological 

from other counties by the government. Seminary Library, 3401 Brook Rd., (Pres- 

Excellent service is extended research- byterian History); Virginia Historical 

ers at the Virginia State Library in Rich- Society, 707 E. Franklin St. (mss. Vir- 

mond, Va. Loan volumes are limited ginia and Colonial Americans, Confeder- 

to those books of which they have dup- ate state histories); Virginia State Li- 

licates. Photostats of original record brary. Capital St., (Virginia and South- 



VIRGINIA 



163 



ern history, Virginia newspapers and 
public records); Roanoke, (Roanoke), 
Roanoke Public Library, 722 S. Jeffer- 
son St.; Williamsburg, (James City), 
College of William and Mary Library, 
(Virginiana, Early Americana). 

Some of the more important books on 
Virginia: 

Burgess, Louis A., Virginia Soldiers o/ 
1776. 3 Vol.. pub. 1927 Richmond Press. 
Richmond, Va. 

Du Bellet, Louise Pecquet. Some Promi- 
nent Virginia Families, 4 Vol. pub 1907 
Lynchburg. 

GwATHMEY, John H.. Historical Register 
o/ Virginia in the Revolution, — Soldiers. 
Sailors. Marines. 1775-1783. Pub. 1938, 
Dietz Press, Richmond. Va. 



Hayden, Rev. Horace Edwin, Virginia 
Genealogies, Reprint 1931, The Rare Book 
Shop. Washington. D. C. 

Nugent, Nell Marion, Cavaliers and 
Pioneers, Abstracts of Land Patents and 
Grants 1623-1800. 5 Vol. pub. 1934. Deitz 
Printing Co.. Richmond. Va. 

SwEM, E. G.. Virginia Historical Index, 
2 Vol. pub. 1934. Stone Printing and Mfg. 
Co.. Roanoke, Va. 

Virginia Magazine o[ History and Bio- 
graphy, Published by the Virginia Historical 
Society, 707 E. Franklin St., Richmond, Va. 

William and Mary Quarterly, (a maga- 
zine of early American history, institutions 
and culture) Published by College of Wil- 
liam and Mary. Williamsburg. Va. 



Name 

Accomac 

Albemarle 

Alexandria 



Map 
Index 

B4 
B2 



Alleghany Bl 

Amelia C2 

Amherst B2 

Appomatox C2 

Arlington A3 

Augusta B2 

Bath Bl 



Bedford 
Bland 
Botetourt 
Brunswick 



CI 
D3 
Bl 
C3 



Buchanan D2 
Buckingham B2 
Campbell C2 
Caroline B3 

Carroll D3 

Charles City B3 
Charlotte C2 

Chesterfield B3 
Clarke A2 

Craig CI 

Culpeper B2 
Cumberland B2 
Dickenson D2 
Dinwiddle C3 
Elizabeth City C4 
Essex B3 



Virginia County Histories 

(Population figures to nearest thousand. 1950 Census) 

Census 
Date Pop. Report.s 

Formed By M Available Parent County County Seat 

1661-2 34 1810-80 Northampton Accomac 

1744 53 1810-80 Goochland, Louisa Charlottesville 

1801 1850-80 Fairfax, became part of Dist. 

of Columbia 

1822 29 1830-80 Bath, Botetourt, Monroe Covington 

1734 8 1810-80 Brunswick, Prince George Amelia 

1761 20 1810-80 Albemarle Amherst 

1845 9 1850-80 Buckingham, Campbell, 

Charlotte, Prince Edward .... Appomattox 

1801 197 1810-80 Fairfax Arlington 

1738-4566 1810-80 Orange Staunton 

1790-1 6 1810-80 Augusta, Botetourt, 

Greenbrier Warm Springs 

1753-4 30 1810-80 Albemarle, Lunenburg Bedford 

1861 6 1870-80 Giles, Tazewell, Wythe Bland 

1769-7016 1810-80 Augusta, Rockbridge Fincastle 

1720-3220 1810-80 Prince George Isle of 

Wight, Surry Lawrenceville 

1858 36 1860-80 Russell. Tazewell Grundy 

1761 12 1810-80 Albemarle, Appomattox .... Buckingham 

1781-2 77 1810-80 Bedford Rustburg 

1727-8 12 1810-80 Essex, King and Queen, 

King William Bowling Green 

1842 27 1850-80 Grayson, Patrick Hillsville 

1634 5 1810-80 Original Shire Charles City 

1764-5 14 1810-80 Lunenburg Charlotte 

Court Hoase 

1749 46 1810-80 Henrico Chesterfield 

1836 7 1840-80 Frdeerick, Warren Berryville 

1851 3 1860-80 Botetourt, Giles, Roanoe, Monroe, 

Alleghany, Montgomery Newcastle 

1748-9 13 1810-80 Orange Culpeper 

1748-9 7 1810-80 Goochland Cumberland 

1880 23 Buchanan, Russell, Wise Clintwood 

1752 54 1810-80 Prince Georg e Dinwiddle 

1634 61 1810-80 Orig. Shire Hampton 

1692 7 1810-80 Old Rappahannock Tappahannock 



164 



THIRD EDITION OF THE HANDY BOOK FOR GENEALOGISTS 



Name 

Fairfax 

Fauquier 

Floyd 

Fluvanna 

Franklin 

Frederick 

Giles 



Map 
Index 

A3 
A3 
D3 
B2 
CI 
A2 
D3 



B3 
B3 
CI 
Bl 



Gloucester B4 
Goochland B2 
Grayson D3 

Greene B2 

Greensville C3 
Halifax C2 

Hanover 
Henrico 
Henry 
liighland 
Isle of Wight C3 
James City C3 
King and 

Queen B3 

King George B3 
King 

William 
Lancaster 
Lee 

Loudoun 
Louisa 
Lunenburg C2 
Madison B2 

Mathews B4 
Mecklenburg C2 
Middlesex B4 
Montgomery D3 



Date Pop. 
Formed By M 

1742 106 
1759 21 
1831 11 
1777 7 
1785-6 25 
1738-4331 
1806 19 

1651 10 

1727-8 9 

1792-3 21 

1838 5 

1780-1 16 

1752 41 

1720-1 22 
1634 288 

1776-7 48 

1847 4 

1634 15 

1634 13 



1691 
1720-1 



B3 
B4 
Dl 
A3 
B2 



1701-2 8 
1651 9 
1792-3 36 
1757 21 
1742 13 
1746 14 
1792-3 8 
1790-1 7 
1764-5 33 
1673-4 7 
1776-7 39 



Nelson B2 1807-8 14 

New Kent B3 1654 4 

Norfolk C4 1691 404 

Northampton B4 1634 17 
Northumberland B4 1648 10 

Nottoway C2 1788-9 15 

Orange B2 1734 13 

Page A2 1831 15 

Patrick D3 1790-1 16 

Pittsylvania CI 1766-7101 
Powhatan B3 



Prince 

Edward 
Prince 

George 
Prince 

William 
Princess 

Anne 
Pulaski 



1777 



C2 1753-4 15 



C3 1702-3 30 



A3 1730-1 23 



Census 
Reports 
Available 

1810-80 
1810-80 
1840-80 
1810-80 
1810-80 
1810-80 
1810-80 

1810-80 
1810-80 
1820-80 
1840-80 
1810-80 
1820-80 
1810-80 
1810-80 
1820-80 
1850-80 
1810-80 
1820-80 

1810-80 
1810-80 

1820-80 
1810-80 
1810-80 
1810-80 
1820-80 
1810-80 
1810-80 
1810-80 
1820-80 
1820-80 
1810-80 



Parent County 



County Seat 



Nansemond C4 1637 38 1820-80 



C4 
D3 



1691 
1839 



Rappahannock A2 1833 



42 

28 

6 



1810-80 
1810-80 
1810-80 
1820-80 
1810-80 
1810-80 
1820-80 
1840-80 
1820-80 
1820-80 
1810-80 

1810-80 

1810-80 

1810-80 

1810-80 
1840-80 
1840-80 



Prince William, Loudoun Fairfax 

Prince William Warrenton 

Montgomery, Franklin Floyd 

Albemarle Palmyra 

Bedford, Henry, Patrick — Rockymount 

Orange, Augusta Winchester 

Montgomery, Monroe, Tazewell, 

Craig, Mercer, Wythe Pearisburg 

York Gloucester 

Henrico Goochland 

Wythe, Patrick Independence 

Orange Stanardsville 

Brunswick, Sussex Emporia 

Lunnenburg Halifax 

New Kent Hanover 

Original Shire Richmond 

Pittsylvania, Patrick Martinsville 

Bath, Pendleton Monterey 

Original Shire Isle of Wight 

Original Shire Williamsburg 

New Kent King & Queen C. H. 

Richmond, Westmoreland .... King George 

King and Queen King William 

Northumberland, York Lancaster 

Russell, Scott Jonesville 

Fairfax Leesburg 

Hanover Louisa 

Brunswick Lunenburg 

Culpeper Madison 

Gloucester Mathews 

Lunenburg Boydton 

Lancaster Saluda 

Fincastle, Botetourt, 

Pulaski Christiansburg 

New Norfolk (called Upper 

Norfolk to 1642) Suffolk 

Amherst Lovingston 

York (Pt. James City) New Kent 

Lower Norfolk Portsmouth 

Original Shire Eastville 

York Heathsville 

Amelia Nottoway 

Spotsylvania Orange 

Rockingham, Shenandoah Luray 

Henry Stuart 

Halifax Chatham 

Cumberland, Chesterfield Powhatan 

Amelia Farmville 

Charles City Prince George 

King George, Stafford Manassas 

Lower Norfolk Princess Anne 

Montgomery, Wythe Pulaski 

Culpeper Washington 



VIRGINIA 



165 



Name 



Map Date Pop. 

Index Formed By M 



Richmond B3 
Roanoke CI 
Rockbridge Bl 
Rockingham A2 
Russell D2 

Scott D2 

Shenandoah A2 
Smyth D2 

Southampton C3 
Spotsylvania B3 



Stafford 

Surry 

Sussex 

Tazewell 

Warren 



A3 
C3 
C3 
D2 
A2 



1692 6 
1838 133 
1778 29 



1778 
1787 
1814 
1772 
1852 
1749 



46 
27 
28 
21 
30 
27 



1720-1 24 

1664 12 
1652 6 
1753-4 13 
1799-0048 
1836 15 



Census 
Reports 

Available Parent County County Seat 

1810-80 Rappahannock (old) Warsaw 

1840-80 Botetourt, Montgomery Salem 

1810-80 Augusta, Botetourt Lexington 

1810-80 Augusta Harrisonburg 

1820-80 Washington Lebanon 

1820-80 Lee, Russell, Washington Gate City 

1810-80 Frederick (Dunmore 'til 1778) .. Woodstock 

1840-80 Washington, Wythe Marion 

1810-80 Isle of Wight, Nansemond Courtland 

1810-80 Essex, King and Queen, 

King William Spotsylvania 

1810-80 Westmoreland Stafford 

1810-80 James City Surry 

1810-80 Surry Sussex 

1820-80 Russell, Wythe Tazewell 

1840-80 Frederick, Shenandoah Front Royal 



County Map of Virginia 




166 



THIRD EDITION OF THE HANDY BOOK FOR GENEALOGISTS 



Census 
Map Date Pop. Reports 

Name Index Formed By M Available Parent County County Sea*: 

Warrosquoyacke 1634 Original Shire 

Warwick C4 1634 82 1810-80 Original Shire Denbigh 

Washington D2 1776-7 53 1810-80 Fincastle, Montgomery Abingdon 

Westmoreland B3 1653 10 1810-80 Northumberland Montross 

Wise D2 1856 56 1860-80 Lee, Russell, Scott Wise 

Wythe D3 1789-9023 1810-80 Montgomery (Pt. Grayson) .... Wytheville 

York C4 1634 12 1810-80 Original Shire Yorktown 

Missing U. S. Census Schedules for Virginia Counties 

1. Records of counties for 1790 and 1800. 

2. 1810 records missing: Alexandria, Grayson, Halifa.x, Henry, James City, 
King Williams, Louisa, Mecklenburg, Nansemond, Northampton, Orange, Patrick, 
Pittsylvania, Russell, and Tazewell. 

3. For Alexandria records of 1800, 1820, 1830, and 1840, see Washington, D. C. 

Census Records Available from Discontinued Virginia Counties 

Barbour, 1850, 1860; Berkeley, 1810-1860; Boone, 1850, 1860; Braxton, 1840-1860; 
Brooke, 1810-1860; Cabell, 1820-1860; Calhoun, 1 .60; Clay, 1860; Doddridge, 1850, 
1860; Fayette, 1840-1860; Gilmer, 1850, 1860; Greenbrier, 1820-1860; Hampshire, 
1820-1860; Hancock, 1850, 1860; Hardy, 1820-1860; Harrison, 1810-1860; Jackson, 
1840-1860; Jefferson, 1810-1860; Kanawha, 1810-1860; Lewis, 1820-1860; Logan, 1830- 
1860; McDowell, 1860; Marion, 1850, 1860; Marshall, 1840-1860; Mason, 1810-1860; 
Mercer, 1840-1860; Monongalia, 1810-1860; Monroe, 1810-1860; Morgan, 1830-1860; 
Nicholas, 1820-1860; Ohio, 1810-1860; Pendleton, 1810-1860; Pleasants, 1860; 
Pocahontas, 1830-1860; Preston, 1820-1860; Putnam, 1850, 1860; Raleigh, 1850, 1860; 
Randolph, 1810-1860; Ritchie, 1850, 1860; Roane, 1860; Taylor, 1850, 1860; Tucker, 
1860; Tyler, 1820-1860; Upshur, 1860; Wayne, 1850, 1860; Webster, 1860; Wetzel, 
1850, 1860; Wirt, 1850, 1860; Wood, 1810-1860; Wyoming, 1850, 1860. 



Washington 



Capital, Olympia 



Washington became a Territory in 
1853, after having been part of Oregon 
Territory since 1848. Included in that 
territorial domain was all of the pre- 
sent Idaho. It was reduced to its present 
dimensions in 1889 when Washington 
became the forty-second state to enter 
the Union. 

During the years of its greatest growth, 
Washington received thousands of form- 
er residents of Wisconsin, Minnesota and 
other western states. Many Canadian 
farmers flocked there to secure good land 
at a low price. Most of the newcomers at 
that time were Canadians, Swedes, Nor- 
wegians, English, Germans, Finns, Ital- 
ians, Russians, Danes, and Scotch. The 
Scandinavian immigrants felt especial- 
ly at home since the country and the 
climate reminded them of the place they 
had previously inhabited. 

Since 1907 the Statistics Section of 



the State Department of Health, 1412 
Smith Tower, Seattle, Wash., has had 
control of all birth and death records 
v/ithin the state. Records prior to that 
time are on file in the offices of the 
County Auditor of the respective coun- 
ties. In the cities of Seattle, Spokane, 
Bellingham and Tacoma, they may be 
obtained at the city health departments. 

Records of marriages are at the of- 
fices of the respective County Auditors. 
All land records are also filed in those 
offices. 

The County Clerks have charge of the 
records of wills and all probate matters. 

A partial list of Washington libraries: 
Bellingham, (Whatcom), Bellingham 
Public Library, 1414 Commercial St.; 
Olympia, (Thurston), Regional Pub- 
lic Library, 7th & Franklin Sts.; Wash- 
ington State Library, Temple of Justice, 
(genealogy, Washington newsapers) ; Se- 



WASHINGTON 



167 



County Map of Washington 



B 







D 




< 

< 
> 




\ 

< 

U 

-i 


(A 


< 

2 
< 

< 


r 


! 

-1 


\ 

N 

-1 


u 



168 



THIRD EDITION OF THE HANDY BOOK FOR GENEALOGISTS 



attle, (King), King County Library, 906- 
908 Fourth Ave.; Seattle Public Library, 
4th Ave. & Madison St., (Northwest); 
University of Washington Library, (Pa- 
cific Northwest); Spokane, (Spokane), 



Spokane Public Library, S. 10 Cedar St., 
(Pacific Northwest); Spokane County 
Library, 1604 W. Riverside; Tacoma, 
(Pierce), Tacoma Public Library, 1120 
S. Tacoma Ave.; Washington State His- 
torical Society. 



Washington County Histories 

(Population figures to nearest thousand, 1950 Census] 





Map 


Date 


Pop. 


Census 
Reports 


Name 


Index 


Formed 


By M 


Available 


Adams 


B3 


1883 


7 




Asotin 


A4 


1883 


11 




Benton 


C4 


1855 


51 


1880 


Chelan 


D2 


1899 


39 




Clallam 


F2 


1854 


26 


1860-80 


Clark 


E4 


1854 


85 


1860-80 


Columbia 


A4 


1855 


5 


1860-80 


Cowlitz 


E4 


1854 


53 


1860-80 


Douglas 


C2 


1883 


11 




Ferry 


Bl 


1899 


4 




Franklin 


B3 


1883 


14 




Garfield 


A3 


1881 


3 




Grant 


C3 


"•883 


24 




Gray's Harbor F3 


1885 


54 




Island 


El 


1854 


11 


1860-80 


Jefferson 


F2 


1854 


12 


1860-80 


King 


D2 


1855 


733 


1860-80 


Kitsap 


E2 


1871 


76 


1860-80 


Kittitas 


C3 


1883 


22 




Klickitat 


D4 


1858 


12 


1860-80 


Lewis 


E3 


1855 


44 


1860-80 


Lnicoln 


B2 


1883 


11 




Mason 


E2 


1864 


15 


1870-80 


Okanogan 


CI 


1883 


29 




Pacific 


F3 


1854 


17 


1860-80 


Pend Oreille Al 


1891 


7 




Pierce 


E3 


1853 


276 


1860-80 


San Juan 


El 


1873 


3 


1870-80 


Skagit 


Dl 


1883 


43 




Skamania 


E4 


1854 


5 


1860-80 


Snohomish 


D2 


1853 


112 


1870-80 


Spokane 


A2 


1883 


222 


1860-80 


Stevens 


Al 


1854 


19 


1870-80 


Thurston 


E3 


1853 


45 


1860-80 


Wahkiakum F4 


1855 


4 


1860-80 


Walla Walla B4 


1854 


40 


1860-80 


Whatcom 


Dl 


1857 


67 


1860-80 


Whitman 


A3 


1871 


32 


1880 


Yakima 


D3 


1865 


136 


1870-80 



Parent County County Scat 

Whitman Ritzville 

Garfield Asotin 

Original county Prosser 

Kittitas, Okanogan Wenatchee 

Original county Port Angeles 

Original county Vancouver 

Original county Dayton 

Original county Kelso 

Lincoln Waterville 

Stevens Republic 

Whitman Pasco 

Columbia Pomeroy 

Adams, Lincoln Ephrata 

Original county Montesano 

Original county Coupeville 

Original county Port Townsend 

Original county Seattle 

Jefferson Port Orchard 

Yakima Ellensburg 

Original county Goldendale 

Original county Chehalis 

Spokane Davenport 

Sawanish Shelton 

Stevens Okanogan 

Original county South Bend 

Stevens Newport 

Original county Tacoma 

Whatcom Friday Harbor 

Whatcom Mt. Vernon 

Original county Stevenson 

Original county Everett 

Stevens Spokane 

Original county Colville 

Original county Olympia 

Original county Cathlamet 

Original county Walla Walla 

Island Bellingham 

Stevens Colfax 

Indian and Unorg. Terr Yakima 



IVest Virginia 

Capital, Charleston 

West Virginia came into existance as much in common. One of the main reas- 

a direct result of the Civil War. That ons for this, no doubt, is the rugged Al- 

section had always been part of Virginia, legheny mountain range separating the 

even though the two sections never had two sections, which made traveling be- 



WEST VIRGINIA 



169 



tvveen them rather difficult. When Vir- 
ginia cast its lot with the Confederacy, 
the settlers west of the Alleghenies be- 
gan to murmur. The complaint event- 
ually became so loud and demanding 
tliat a separate government for the 
western section was organized in 1861. 
Two years later West Virginia was ad- 
mitted into the Union as the twenty- 
fifth state. 

The physical features of the section 
make West Virginia more accessible 
from Pennsylvania than from Virginia, 
At least, it was so in the early days. 
In those days the Indian trails served 
as roads and much of the travel was 
in the direction from Pennsylvania to 
West Virginia. Germans, Welsh, and 
Irish came as early as 1670. English in 
1671, various nationalities in 1715 and 
1725. Some of the early settlers merely 
crossed over from Maryland and made 
their homes in the present Berkeley 
and Jefferson counties.. 

Among different nationalities who have 
come to West Virginia to man various 
factories are Italians, Poles, Hungarians, 
Austrians, English, Germans, Greeks, 
Russians, and Czechs. 

Most of the counties in West Virginia 
were settled years before they were or- 
ganized. Here are figures showing ihe 
years the respective counties were set- 
tled: Brooke 1744; Pendleton, 1747; 
Randolph, 1753; Monroe, 1760; Monon- 
galia, 1767; Greenbrier and Ohio, 1769; 
Harrison, Marion, and Preston, 1772; 
Kanawha, 1773; Mason and Tucker 



1774; Cabell and Mercer, 1775; Han- 
cock, 1776; Marshall, 1777; Barbour and 
Wetzel, 1780; Jackson and Wirt, 1796; 
Wood, 1797; Boone, 1798; Lincoln, 1799; 
Putnam and Roan, 1800. 

The Division of Vital Statistics, State 
Health Department, State House, Charles- 
ton, W. v., have the records of births 
and deaths from 1917 to the present, 
marriages since 1921. Earlier marriages 
are recorded in the offices of the respec- 
tive County Clerks. 

The Virginia tax lists, published to 
replace the fire destroyed 1790 Federal 
Census, give a record of the taxpayers 
in the West Virginia counties of those 
days. A number of West Virginia coun- 
ties have published the 1850 Census, con- 
taining the names, ages and dates of 
birth of all family members. 

The County Clerk has charge of all 
court and land records. 

Books on West Virginia history and 
genealogy: 

Hale, J. P., Trans-Allegheny Pioneers, 
Pub. 1886. 

Myers, S., History o[ West Virginia, 2 
Vols. Pub. 1915. 

Sons of the Revolution in the State oi 
West Virginia, published by West Virginia 
Society, 1941. 

West Virginia Libraries: Charleston, 
(Kanawha), Kanawha County Library, 
Lee & Dickinson Sts.; West Virginia 
Dept. of Archives & History Library; 
Huntington, (Cabell), Huntington Pub- 
lic Library, 900 Fifth Ave.; Morgantown, 
(Monongalia), West Virginia University 
Library, (West Virginia). 



Name 



West Virginia County Histories 

Population figures to nearest thousand. 1950 Census) 



Census 
Map Date Pop. Reports 

Index Formed By M Available 



Barbour 


B3 


1843 


20 


1850-80 


Berkeley 


C4 


1772 


30 


1790-80 


Boone 


Bl 


1847 


33 


1850-80 


Braxton 


B2 


1836 


18 


1840-80 


Brooke 


A3 


1796 


27 


1800-80 


Cabell 


Al 


1809 


108 


1810-80 


Calhoun 


B2 


1856 


10 


1860-80 


Clay 


B2 


1858 


15 


1860-80 


Doddridge 


B3 


1845 


9 


1850-80 


Fayette 


B2 


1831 


82 


1840-80 


Gilmer 


B2 


1845 


10 


1850-80 


Grant 


C3 


1866 


9 


1870-80 


Greenbrier 


C2 


1778 


29 


1790-80 


Hampshire 


C4 


1753 


13 


1790-80 


Hancock 


A4 


1748 


34 


1850-80 


Hardy 


B4 


1785 


10 


1790-80 



Parent County County Seat 

Harrison, Lewis, Randolph Philippi 

Frederick Martinsburg 

Kanawha, Cabell, Logan Madison 

Kanawha, Lewis, Nicholas Sutton 

Ohio Wellsburg 

Kanawha Huntington 

Gilmer Grantsville 

Braxton, Nicholas Clay 

Harrison, Tyler, Ritchie W. Union 

Kanawha, Greenbrier, Logan .. Fayettevillo 

Lewis, Kanawha Glenville 

Hardy Petersburg 

Montgomery Lewisburg 

Frederick Romney 

Brooke New Cumberland 

Hampshire Moorefield 



170 



THIRD EDITION OF THE HANDY BOOK FOR GENEALOGISTS 











Census 




Map 


Date 


Pop. 


Reports 


Name 


Index 


Formed 


By M 


Available 


Harrison 


B3 


1784 


85 


1790-80 


Jackson 


A2 


1831 


15 


1840-80 


Jefferson 


B4 


1801 


17 


1810-80 


Kanawha 


B2 


1789 


240 


1790-80 


Lewis 


B3 


1816 


21 


1820-80 


Lincoln 


Bl 


1867 


22 


1870-80 


Logan 


Bl 


1824 


77 


1830-80 


McDowell 


CI 


1858 


99 


1860-80 


Marion 


B3 


1842 


72 


1850-80 


Marshall 


A3 


1836 


37 


1840-80 


Mason 


A2 


1804 


24 


1810-80 


Mercer 


01 


1837 


75 


1840-80 


Mineral 


C4 


1866 


22 


1870-80 


Mingo 


Bl 


1895 


47 




Monongalia 


B3 


1776 


61 


1790-80 


Monroe 


C2 


1779 


13 


1790-80 


Morgan 


C4 


1820 


8 


1820-80 


Nicholas 


B2 


1818 


28 


1820-80 


Ohio 


A3 


1777 


72 


1790-80 


Pendleton 


C3 


1787 


9 


1790-80 


Pleasants 


A3 


1851 


6 


1860-80 


Pocahontas 


C2 


1821 


12 


1830-80 


Preston 


B3 


1818 


31 


1820-80 


Putnam 


B2 


1848 


21 


1850-80 


Raleigh 


01 


1850 


96 


1860-80 


Randolph 


B3 


1787 


31 


1790-80 


Ritchie 


B2 


1843 


13 


1850-80 


Roane 


B2 


1856 


18 


1860-80 



Parent County County Seat 

Monongalia Clarksburg 

Kanawha, Mason, Wood Ripley 

Berkeley Charles Town 

Greenbrier, Montgomery Charleston 

Harrison Weston 

Boone, Cabell, Kanawha Hamlin 

Kanawha, Cabell, Giles Logan 

Tazewell Welch 

Harrison, Monongalia Fairmont 

Ohio Moundsville 

Kanawha Point Pleasant 

Giles, Tazewell Princeton 

Hampshire Keyser 

Logan Williamson 

Dist. of W. Augusta Morgantown 

Greenbrier Union 

Berkeley, Hampshire -... Berkeley Springs 

Greenbrier, Kanawha Summersville 

Dist, of W. Augusta Wheeling 

Augusta, Hardy Franklin 

Ritchie, Tyler, Wood St. Marys 

Pendleton, Randolph Marlinton 

Monongalia Kingwood 

Kanawha, Mason, Cabell Winfield 

Fayette Beckley 

Harrison Elkins 

Harrison, Lewis Harrisville 

Kanawha, Jackson, Gilmer Spencer 





County Map of West Virginia 




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WEST VIRGINIA 



171 











Census 




Map 


Date 


Pop. 


Reports 


Name 


Index 


Formed 


By M 


Available 


Summers 


C2 


1871 


19 


1880 


Taylor 


B3 


1844 


18 


1850-80 


Tucker 


B3 


1856 


11 


1860-80 


Tyler 


A3 


1814 


11 


1820-80 


Upshur 


B3 


1851 


19 


1860-80 


Wayne 


Bl 


1842 


39 


1850-80 


Webster 


B2 


1860 


18 


1870-80 


Wetzel 


A3 


1846 


20 


1850-80 


Wirt 


B2 


1848 


5 


1850-80 


Wood 


A2 


1798 


67 


1800-80 


Wyoming 


CI 


1850 


38 


1860-80 



Greenbrier, Monroe, Mercer Hinton 

Barbour, Harrison, Marion Grafton 

Randolph Parsons 

Ohio Middlebourne 

Randolph, Barbour, Lewis .... Buckhannon 

Cabell Wayne 

Braxton, Nicholas Webster Springs 

Tyler New Martinsville 

Wood, Jackson Elizabeth 

Harrison Parkersburg 

Logan Pineville 



Wisconsin 



Capital, Madison 



Settlers established themselves in the 
Wisconsin area as early as 1832. In 1840, 
according to the first U. S. Census tak- 
en, there were 130,945. The real influx 
of people came about 1848 when tens 
of thousands of people, mainly from the 
northern European countries came into 
the territory. The 1850 Census register- 
ed 305,391, and the 1860 Census 775.881. 

By far the largest number of these 
immigrants were Germans. 

About 1840 nearly all of the counties 
facing Lake Michigan had received 
thousands of settlers. The Rock River 
Valley in Rock County also had many 
settlers at that time and earlier. 

Wisconsin became a Territory in its 
own name in 1836. Previously it had 
been part of several Territories, includ- 
ing Indiana from 1800 to 1809; Illinois, 
1809, to 1818; Michigan, 1818 to 1836. 
In 1848 it became the thirtieth state in 
the Union. 

The leading nationalities represented 
in Wisconsin, in their numerical order 
are German (nearly three to one), Pol- 
ish, Norwegian, Russian, Austrian, Swed- 
ish, Czech, Italian, Danish, Hungarian, 
English, Finnish, Greek, Irish and French. 

The Bureau of Vital Statistics, Madi- 
son 2, Wisconsin, has birth and death 
records from 1860 to date. 

Marriage Bans — address church where 



recorded. 

Wills, deeds, land grants, tax payers 
lists — all these records are available in 
the various county court houses. Address 
inquiries to the County Clerk., 

War Service Records — Adjutant Gen- 
eral's Office, State Capital, Madison. 

Cemetery Records — A few have been 
transferred to the various county clerks, 
but the practice is not at all general. 
Contact the local sexton. 

Guardianship and Orphan Court Pro- 
ceedings are held by the issuing court 
and by the Public Welfare Department, 
State Capital. 

The Library of the State Historical 
Society of Wisconsin includes some 
750,000 volumes, nearly one fifth of 
which deals with genealogy and local 
history. Books and pamphlets dealing 
with every state in the union and col- 
lective and individual American gen- 
ealogies are included. Many church his- 
tories and records supplement those vol- 
umes generally classified as genealog- 
ical. 

Wisconsin Libraries: Eau Claire, (Eau 
Claire), Eau Claire Public Library, 217 S. 
Farwell, (Wisconsin, local history) : 
Kenosha, (Kenosha), Gilbert M. Sim- 
mons Public Library, 711 59th PI.; La 
Crosse, (La Crosse), La Crosse County 
Public Library. 



Wisconsin County Histories 

Population figures to nearest thousand, 1950 Census) 



Name 

Adams 
Asland 
Barron 



Map 



Date Pop. 



Censu."- 
Report 



Index Formed By M Available 

D3 1856 8 1850-80 

A2 1856 19 1860-80 

Bl 1868 35 1870-80 



Parent County County Seat 

Portage Friendship 

Unorganized Territory Ashland 

Dallas, Polk Barron 



172 



THIRD EDITION OF THE HANDY BOOK FOR GENEALOGISTS 



Name 


Map 
Index 


Date 
Formed 


Pop. 
By M 


Census 

Reports 

Available 


Bayfield 


A2 


1866 


14 


1870-80 


Brown 


C4 


1818 


98 


1840-80 


Buffalo 


CI 


1853 


15 


1860-80 


Burnett 


Bl 


1856 


10 


1860-80 


Calumet 


D4 


1836 


19 


1840-80 


Chippewa 


C2 


1845 


43 


1850-80 


Clark 


C2 


1853 


32 


1860-80 


Columbia 


D3 


1846 


34 


1850-80 


Crawford 


E2 


1818 


18 


1840-80 


Dane 


E3 


1838 


169 


1840-80 


Dodge 


D3 


1836 


58 


1840-80 


Door 


C4 


1851 


21 


1860-80 


Douglas 


Al 


1856 


47 


1860-80 


Dunn 


CI 


1856 


27 


1860-80 


Eau Claire 


C2 


1856 


54 


1860-80 


Florence 


B3 


1882 


4 




Fond du Lac D3 


1836 


68 


1840-80 


Forest 


B3 


1885 


9 




Grant 


E2 


1836 


41 


1840-80 


Green 


E2 


1836 


24 


1840-80 


Green Lake 


D3 


1859 


15 


1860-80 


Iowa 


E2 


1829 


20 


1840-80 


Iron 


A2 


1893 


9 




Jackson 


C2 


1853 


16 


1860-80 


Jefferson 


E3 


1853 


43 


1840-80 


Juneau 


D2 


1856 


19 


1860-80 


Kenosha 


D4 


1850 


75 


1850-80 


Kewaunee 


C4 


1852 


17 


1860-80 


La Crosse 


D2 


1851 


68 


1860-80 


Lafayette 


E2 


1846 


18 


1850-80 


Langlade 


B3 


1880 


22 




Lincoln 


B3 


1866 


22 


1870-80 


Manitowoc 


D4 


1836 


67 


1840-80 


Marathon 


C3 


1851 


80 


1850-80 


Marinette 


B4 


1879 


36 




Marquette 


D3 


1818 


9 


1840-80 


Milwaukee 


D4 


1834 


871 


1840-80 


Monroe 


D2 


1856 


31 


1860-80 


Oconto 


C4 


1851 


26 


1860-80 


Oneida 


B3 


1885 


21 




Outagamie 


C3 


1851 


82 


1860-80 


Ozaukee 


E4 


1853 


23 


1860-80 


Pepin 


CI 


1851 


7 


1860-80 


Pierce 


CI 


1853 


21 


1860-80 


Polk 


Bl 


1853 


25 


1860-80 


Portage 


C3 


1836 


35 


1840-80 


Price 


B2 


1878 


16 




Racine 


D4 


1836 


110 


1840-80 


Richland 


D2 


1842 


19 


1850-80 


Rock 


E2 


1836 


43 


1840-80 


Rusk 


B2 


1902 


17 




St. Croix 


CI 


1838 


26 


1840-80 


Sauk 


D2 


1838 


38 


1840-80 


Sawyer 


B2 


1883 


10 




Shawano 


C3 


1856 


35 


1860-80 



Parent County County Seat 

Ashland Washburn 

Territorial county Green Bay 

Trempeleau Alma 

Polk Grantsburg 

Territorial county Chilton 

Crawford Chippewa Falls 

Marathon Neillsville 

Portage Portage 

Territorial county Prairie du Chien 

Territorial county Madison 

Territorial county Juneau 

Brown Sturgeon Bay 

Unorganized Territory Superior 

Chippewa Menomonie 

Clark Eau Claire 

Marinette, Oconto Florence 

Territorial county Fond du Lac 

Langlade, Oconto Crandon 

Territorial county Lancaster 

Territorial county Monroe 

Marquette District Green Lake 

Territorial county Dodgeville 

Ashland, Oneida Hurley 

LaCrosse Black River Falls 

Dodge, Waukesha Jefferson 

Adams Mauston 

Racine Kenosha 

Manitiwoc Kewaunee 

Unorganized Territory La Crosse 

Iowa Darlington 

Oconto Antigo 

Marathon Merrill 

Territorial county ... -. Manitowoc 

Portage Wausau 

Oconto Marinette 

Marquette District Montello 

Territorial county Milwaukee 

Unorganized Territory Sparta 

Unorganized Territory Oconto 

Lincoln Rhinelander 

Brown Appleton 

Milwaukee Port Washington 

Chippewa Durand 

St. Croix Ellsworth 

St. Croix Balsam Lake 

Territorial county Stevens Point 

Chippewa, Lincoln Phillips 

Territorial county Racine 

Iowa Richland Center 

Territorial county Janesville 

Chippewa Ladysmith 

Territorial county Hudson 

Territorial county Baraboo 

Ashland, Chippewa Hayward 

Oconto Shawano 



WISCONSIN 



173 



Census 



Map 
Name Index 


Date 
Formed 


Pop. 
By M 


Reports 

Available 


Sheboygan D4 


1836 


81 


1840-80 


Taylor B2 


1875 


18 




Trempealeau C2 


1851 


24 


1860-80 


Vernon D2 


1863 


28 


1870-80 


Vilas B3 


1898 


9 




Walworth E2 


1836 


42 


1840-80 


Washburn Bl 


1883 


12 




Washington E4 


1836 


34 


1840-80 



Parent County County Seat 

Territorial county Sheboygan 

Clark, Lincoln Medford 

Chippewa Whitehall 

Richland, Crawford Viroqua 

Oneida Eagle River 

Territorial county Elkhorn 

Burnett Shell Lake 

Territorial county West Bend 



County Map of Wisconsin 



B 



D 



DOUGLAS 



BURNETT 



POLK I BARRON I RUSK 




174 THIRD EDITION OF THE HANDY BOOK FOR GENEALOGISTS 

Census 
Map Date Pop. Reports 

Name Index Formed By M Available Parent County County Sent 

Waukesha E4 1840 86 1850-80 Milwaukee Waukesha 

Waupaca C3 1851 35 1860-80 Waupaca 

Waushara D3 1851 14 1860-80 Marquette Wautoma 

Winnebago D3 1838 91 1840-80 Territorial county Oshkosh 

Wood C2 1856 51 1860-80 Portage Wisconsin Rapids 

Census Notes — Bad Axe, 1860 schedule available; Brown, 1820 and 1830, see 
Michigan; Crawford, 1820 and 1830 see Michigan; Dallas ( discontinued) 1860 
available; Iowa 1830 see Michigan. 



Wyoming 



Capital, Cheyenne 



Only one state has a smaller popula- 
tion than Wyoming, and only seven have 
a larger area. 

When it was organized as a Territory 
in 1868 it had only six or seven thous- 
and white inhabitants. The middle west 
and the southern states provided most 
of the settlers who came into the state 
to take advantage of the opportunity 
to get into the cattle business. Hundreds 
of thousands of cattle roamed the west- 
ern hills unherded. The eastern sec- 
tion had good agricultural soil . 

In 1940 the foreign born population of 
Wyoming ranked in this order in num- 
bers: England, Germany, Sweden, Russia, 
Italy, Austria, Greece, Denmark, Nor- 
way, Ireland, Poland, Finland, Czechoslo- 
vakia, France and Hungary. 



Wyoming became a state, the forty- 
fourth, in 1890. 

In 1869 Wyoming became the first sec- 
tion of the United States to grant its 
women the right to vote in all elections. 

The Wyoming State Library in Chey- 
enne has a genealogical section. 

Birth and death records from 1909 to 
the present, and marriage records from 
May 1, 1941 are at the office of the 
Division of Vital Statistics, Cheyenne, 
Wyoming. 

The County Clerk of each county is 
custodian of the birth and death re- 
cords from the beginning of the county 
until 1909, the marriage records from 
the beginning of the county until May 
1, 1941, the wills, probate matters, and 
all land records. 



Wyoming County Histories 

(Population figures to nearest thousand, 1950 Census) 











Census 




Map 


Date 


Pop. 


Reports 


Name 


Index 


Formed 


By M 


Available 


Albany 


B4 


1868 


19 


1870-80 


Big Horn 


CI 


1890 


13 




Campbell 


Bl 


1911 


5 




Carbon 


C4 


1868 


16 


1870-80 


Converse 


B3 


1888 


6 




Crook 


Al 


1878 


5 


1880 


Fremont 


D2 


1885 


20 




Goshen 


A3 


1911 


13 




Hot Springs D2 


1911 


5 




Johnson 


B2 


1875 


5 




Laramie 


A4 


1868 


48 


1870-80 


Lincoln 


E3 


1911 


9 




Natrona 


C3 


1888 


31 




Niobrara 


A3 


1911 


5 




Park 


Dl 


1909 


15 




Platte 


A3 


1911 


8 




Sheridan 


CI 


1888 


20 




Sublette 


E3 


1921 


2 





Parent County County Seat 

Original county Laramie 

Fremont, John, Sheridan Basin 

Johnson, Converse Gillette 

Original county Rawlins 

Laramie, Albany Douglas 

Formerly Pease Co Sundance 

Sweetwater Lander 

Platte, Laramie Torrington 

Fremont Thermopolis 

Pease Buffalo 

Original county Cheyenne 

Uinta Kemmerer 

Carbon Casper 

Converse Lusk 

Albany, Big Horn Cody 

Johnson Wheatland 

Johnson Sheridan 

Fremont Pinedale 



WYOMING 



175 



Map 
Name Index 

Sweetwater D4 
Teton E2 

Uinta E4 

Washakie C2 



Date Pop. 
Formed By M 

1868 22 

1921 3 

1868 7 

1911 7 



Census 
Reports 
Available 

1870-80 



1870-80 



Wpston 



A2 1911 



Parent County County Seat 

Original county Green River 

Lincoln Jackson 

Original county Evanston 

Big Horn, Fremont, Crook Worland 

Crook Newcastle 




Province 



Belgium 



Provinces of Belgium 



Map Index 


Capital 


D3 


Antwerpen (Antwerp) 


E3 


♦Bruxelles (Brussels) 


E2 


Mons (Bergen) 


E4 


Li^ge (Luik) 


D3 


Hasselt 


F4 


Aarlon (Arlon) 


F3 


Namur (Namen) 


E2 


Gent (Gand or Ghent) 


El 


Brugge (Bruges) 



Antwerpen (Antwerp) 

Brabrant 

Hainaut 

Li^ge 

Limbourg (Limburg) 

Luxembourg 

Namur 

Oost Vlaanderen (East Flanders) 

West Vlaanderen (West Flanders 

The history of Belgium dates from 1831 when the South Netherlands parted 
from Holland and became an independent kingdom. 

S«e Map Pagre 196 



Canada 



By virtue of discovery and settlement 
France claimed possession of Canada as 
early as 1532. By 1642 Acadia, Quebec, 
and Montreal had been founded. Follow- 
ing the French and Indian Wars ex- 
tending over a seventy-year period, the 
Treaty of Paris transferred Canada 
to British rule in 1763. 

After Canada came under British con- 
trol, many of the early American col- 
onists, unwilling to sever their British 
citizenship riehts. migrated to Canada 
where they established their homes. The 
French, who had come there earlier, 
remained in Canada, later became Can- 
adian citizens, but retained their French 
language. 

Canada is divided into ten provinces. 
Alberta, British Columbia, Manitoba, 
New Brunswick, Newfoundland, Nova 
Scotia, Ontario, Prince Edward Island, 
Quebec, and Saskatchewan; and two 
territories, Yukon, created in 1898, and 
Northwest Territories, which Canada 
secured in 1870 from Britain and the 
Hudson's Bay Company. 

Ottawa, located in the province of 
Ontario on the south side of the Ottawa 
River, is the Dominion Capital. 

A wealth of genealogical and his- 
torical records is on file at the Public 
Archives in Ottawa, including a museum, 
a Library with books and manuscripts 
dating back to the earliest days. Most 
of the church records are in the prov- 



inces. Researchers should communicate 
with the Archivists, the Dominion and 
the Provincial, to ascertain where infor- 
mation may be obtained. Data regard- 
ing immigration and naturalization 
papers may be secured from the De- 
partment of Mines and Resources, Cit- 
izenship Registration Branch, Ottawa, 
Canada. , 

To have the census of Canada search- 
ed, write to the Public Archives of 
Canada, Ottawa, Canada, Census returns 
since 1871 are not open to the public. 
The officers in charge give the following 
explanation: 

"Information available from the cens- 
us returns are: the family name, the 
age, the country of birth, the religion, 
the trade or profession, the kind of 
house and the property. The census of 
1831 and 1842 give the name of the 
head of the family only. That of 1851, 
1861, and 1871 give the names of the 
father, mother, and the children of 
each family. Each census is taken by 
the province, divided into counties, which 
are subdivided into townships. In order 
to obtain information from any census 
return, the township of the place of 
residence must be given." 

If you do not know the township, 
ask the Archives for the name of a 
genealogist. 

Alberta (D-3) 

Edmonton is the provincial capital, 



176 



CANADA 177 

with a population of 113,116. Other when it was cut out of the Northwestern 

leading cities are Calgary, 100,044; Leth- Territories. 

bridge, 16,522; Medicine Hat, 12,859. The Manitoba counties are Boniface, 

Taken from the Northwest Territories Brandon, Dauphin, Lisgar, MacDonald, 

in 1905, Alberta was made a province. Marquett, Neepawa, Nelson, which con- 

The northern half still remains a wild- stitut«s the northern two-thirds of the 

erness. The province is divided into the provincial area, Portage La Prairie, 

following counties, Acadia Athabasca, Provencher, Souris, Springfield, and 

Battle River, Bow River, Calgary East, Winnipeg. 

Calgary West, Camrose, Edmon, Ed- The office of the Registrar General, 

monton, Lethbridge, Mac Leod, Medicine Vital Statistics Division, Department of 

Hat, Peace River, Red Deer, Vegerville, Health and Public Welfare, 331 Legis- 

and Westaski. lative Bldg., Winnipeg, Canada has vital 

Vital statistics may be secured by statistics from 1874, a few scattered per- 

inquiring from the Deputy Registrar haps earlier. For wills write the Surro- 

General, Department of Public Health, gate Court in the respective district. 

Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. Wills are Some are available from 1891. Land 

on file at the Court House, Edmonton, transfers and deeds must also be checked 

A.lta, Canada. Deeds are at the Land in the district offices of the Registrar 

Titles Office in the same city. of Land Titles. 

British Columbia (E-3) is the wester- New Brunswick (A-5) is the eighth lar- 

most province in Canada. gest province in land area and in popu- 

Its counties are Cariboo, Comox-Al- lation. There are a little more than half 

berni, East Kootenay, Frazer Valley, a million people in the province. 

Nanalmo, Skeena, Vancouver, North In the days of the American Revolu- 

West Kootenay, and Yale. tionary War, English Loyalists moved 

The capital of the province is Victoria, from the colonies into New Brunswick, 

on the south-east tip of Vancouver Others came over from Yorkshire, Eng- 

Island. Victoria has a population of land. More recently French Canadians 

50,744. Other leading cities in the prov- moved south into New Brunswick, 

ince are Vancouver, 340,272, and New The largest cities are St. John, 51,741, 

Westminister, 28,390. on the south coast; Moncton, in the 

British Columbia is the third largest south - central part of Westmoreland 

province both in area and in population, county, 22,763; Fredericton, the prov- 

More than 1,165,000 people live in the incial capital, in York county, on the 

province. It was organized in 1858. The St. John River, 10,062. 

predominating nationalities in the prov- There are fifteen counties in the 

ince are British (almost three-fourths province; Albert, Carleton, Charlotte, 

of entire population); Scandinavian, Gloucester, Kent, Kings, Madawaska, 

German, French, Russian, Italian, and Northumberland, Queens, Restigouche, 

Dutch. St. John, Sunbury, Victoria, Westmor- 

For vital statistics since 1874, and land and York, 
incomplete records since 1836, write From 1888 until 1920 all birth, marri- 
Division of Vital Statistics, Parliament age, and death records have been main- 
Bldgs., Victoria, B. C. For wills since tained by the County Registrars, since 
1858 contact Registrar of Supreme Court, then at the office of the Registrar 
Victoria, B.C. For Land records and deeds General, Department of Health and 
since 1861 write Land Registry Office, Social Service, Fredericton, N. B. Fred- 
Victoria, B. C. ericton is the provincial capital. Records 

Manitoba (C-3) is the sixth province in of wills are with the Registrar of 

area and in population. Probates of each county. All land titles 

Two-thirds of the people of Manitoba and real estate transfers are at the 

are Protestants, belonging to the United office of the Registrar of Deeds of the 

Canadian, the Episcopalian, the Luth- respective counties. 

eran, the Presbyterian, and the Mennon- Newfoundland (A-2) by popular vote, 

ite Church. The other third is Catholic, became a province of Canada in 1949. 

Winnipeg is the provincial capital, St. John's the capital, with a popula- 

and about the only large city in the tion of 52,000, is the only large city 

province. It has a population of 350,924, in the province. About sixteen other 

which is very little less than one half cities have a population between one 

of the entire population of the province, and six thousand, all others less than 

The population is mainly English, Scot- a thousand. 

tish, German, Swiss, Polish, and Ukran- The island has been populated since 

ian. The province was created in 1870 1750. The English and the French 



178 THIRD EDITION OF THE HANDY BOOK FOR GENEALOGISTS 

people predominate. The Roman Catholic Lincoln, St, Catharines; Manitoulin, 
church is the largest numerically, Gore Bay; Middlesex, London; Muskoka, 
closely followed by the Episcopalian. The Bracebridge; Nipissing, North Bay; 
United Canadian Church claims about Norfolk, Simcoe; Northumberland, Co- 
twenty-five per cent of the population, bourg; Ontario, Whitby; Oxford, Wood- 
Other Protestant denominations have stock; Parry Sound, Parry Sound; Peel, 

smaller memberships. k'^^'^Pu'^'U . ^f *^' ^^^^^^^ford; Peter- 

^, .^ , . . . ^^^^ borough, Peterborough; Prescott, L'Orig- 

The vital statistics since 1892 are ,,^1; Prince Edward, Picton; Rainy 

under the care of the Vital Statistics ^^^^^^ ^^ Francis; Renfrew, Pembroke; 

Division of the Departnient of Health, R^gsell; Simcoe, Barrie; Stormont, 

St. Johns, Newfoundland, Canada The Cornwall; Sudbury, Sudbury; Thunder 

Registrar of the Supreme Court, St ^ p^^^ Arthur; Timiskaming, Haile- 

John s, Newfoundland IS the custodian of ^ . Victoria, Lindasay; Waterloo, 

wills. The Registry of Deeds and Com- Kitchener; Welland, Welland; Welling- 

panies,St.Johns Newfoundland, Canada, ^^^ ^uelph; Wentworth, Hamilton; 

IS in charge of all land title records York Toronto 

Nova Scotia (A-3) is the next to the ^mong the ' cities of Ontario are 

smallest in area of the Canadian prov- Toronto, the capital of the province, 

inces and the seventh in population. It 670,945; Hamilton. 207,544; Ottawa, the 

has more than 640,000 people. Its south- Dominion capital, 198,773; Windsor, 119,- 

ern tip is about 250 miles north-north- ^^q. London 94 984 

east from Boston. It changed from 3^^^^, marriage,' and death records 

French to British rule about 1750. ^^^^^ -(ggg ^^^y ^e obtained from the 

A little more than half of the pop- Registrar General, Parliament Bldgs., 

ulation IS English and Scottish. There Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Copies of wills 

are still some French, also German, ^^^y be secured from the county or 

Swiss, Dutch and Irish. district Registrar of the Surrogate 

Halifax IS the capital. It has a court. Information on deeds and land 

population of about 85,000, with Sydney ^j^les may be had from the county 

coming next with about 31,000. offj^e of the Registrar of Deeds. 

Its eighteen counties are: Annapolis, p^i^ce Edward Island, (A-3) one of 

Antigonish, Cape Breton, Colchester, ^^e most productive islands and prov- 

Cumberland, Digby, Guysborough, Hali- i^ces in Canada, is situated between the 

fax, Hants, Inverness, Kings, Lunen- culf of St. Lawrence and the Northum- 

burg, Pictou, Queens, Richmond, She!- merland Strait. French colonies were 

burne, Victoria, and Yarmouth. established as early as 1713. The island 

Vital statistics since 1864 are available ^as made a British colony in 1758. Soon 

at the office of the Deputy Registrar after, colonists from Scotland came to 

General, Department of Public Health, the island. English and Irish settlers 

Halifax, N. S., Canada. The Registrar followed. There are about 15,000 descen- 

of Probates, in each probate district ^j^nts of the early Acadians. 

has the records of the wills. The Registry The island is divided into three 

of Deeds in each probate district is districts or counties. The eastern section 

custodian of deeds and land entries. or county is Kings, with Georgetown 

Ontario (C-4) is the second largest as the countv seat; the central section 

province in land area and the first in or county is Queens, with Charlottetown, 

population. It has more than four and a the provincial capital also serving as 

half million people living within its county seat; the West section or county 

boundaries. Prince, with Summerside as the county 

Its counties and county seats are g^at. Charlottetown is the largest city 

as follows: Algoma, Sault Ste. Marie; on the island with a population of 

Brant, Brantford; Bruce, Walkerton; i5,689; Summerside is the next largest 

Carleton, Ottawa; Cochrane, Cochrane; with 6,522, and Souris, 1,176. 

Dufferin, Orangeville; Dundas, Morris- Vital Statistics records since 1906 are 

burg; Durham; Elgin, St. Thomas; available at the office of the Director 

Essex, Windsor; Frontenac, Kingston; of Vital Statistics, Department of Health 

Glengarry; Grenville; Gray, Owen and Welfare, Charlottetown, P. E. I., 

Sound; Haldimand, Cayuga; Haliburton, Canada. Wills are registered at the 

Minden; Halton, Milton West; Hastings, office of the Judge of Probate in the 

Belleville; Huron, Goderich; Kenora, same city. Deeds are recorded with the 

Kenora; Kent, Chatham; Lambton, Registrar of Deeds for King and Queen 

Sarnia; Lanark, Perth; Leeds, Brock- counties, Charlotteville, P. E. I., Canada, 

ville; Lennox and Addington, Napanee; and the Registrar of Deeds for Prince 



CANADA 



179 



County, Summerside, P. E. I., Canada. the early sixteen hundreds, and their 

Quebec, (B-3) the largest province in descendants are now in the majority 

area and the second largest in population, in the province. More than three-fourths 

has more than four milion inhabitants, of the population are French and 

French settlers came to Quebec in Catholic. 




180 THIRD EDITION OF THE HANDY BOOK FOR GENEALOGISTS 

The province has 76 counties, but none filed in the Regina Land Titles Office, 

of the records in which the genealogical but applicant must describe land and 

researcher is interested are in any of the ^%1^^^ P^?P^" Registration District 

The twenty-one counties of Saskatche- 

county offices. ^an are Assiniboia, Humboldt, Kinders- 

The most prominent cities are Mont- ley, Last Mountain, Long Lake, Mac- 
real (Greater) 1,370,044; Quebec, 161, Kenzie, Maple Creek, Melfort, Melville, 
439; Trois-Rivieres (Three Rivers), Moose Jaw, North Battleford, Prince 
45,708 Albert, Qu Appelle, Regina, Rosetown, 

Vital statistics for Quebec Catholics Saskatoon, South Battleford, Swift 

began about 1622; for Protestants about Current, Weyburn,, Willow Bunch, and 

1887. The Director of the Provincial /orkton. 

Bureau of Health, Quebec, Que., Canada, Among books dealing with the history 

has statistics from 1907. The twenty and genealogy of Canada are the following: 

District Notaries have charge of wills Grant. W. L.. M. A., History of Canada. 

and land transfer records. Authorized by the Minister of Education 

Saskatchewan's (D-3) capital is Regina, f^, Ontario. The Ryerson press. Toronto, 

located in the south-eastern section of |g22 

the province. It is fifth among the ^^ Haughlin, Sara B.. Canadian Edu^ 

Canadian provinces in area and popula- ^^^^^ ^j^^ j^^ ^^ p^^^ ^ ^^20. 

tion, and has more than 800,000 people ^. u a, . j i. . t 

living mostly in the southern half of Gives much on the geography and history of 

the province. (-anada. also many biographies of promi- 

Its largest cities are Regina, 69,928; "^^ "^^"r- i,k ;, ^ , j r 

Saskatoon, 52,732; Moose Jaw, 24,336. ^ ^°^f ' ^eo. Maclean, A Cyclopedia o/ 

Regina is about 700 miles northwest of Car^adian Biography Ros^ Publishing Co., 

Minneapolis via Winnipeg. Toronto. 1888. A collection of persons dis- 

The Director of Vital Statistics, tinguished in professional and political life; 
Dept. of Public Health, Provincial leaders in commerce and industry of Canada 
Health Bldg., Regina, Sa'sk., Canada, ^"^ successful pioneers. 
has charge of the vital statistics of Libraries and genealogical societies in- 
the province. A few records go back elude: Hamilton Public Library, Ham- 
to 1888, but most of them from 1905. '^^^^^^ Ont.; Public Library and Art 
A record of all grants made in wills Museum, Elsie Perrin Williams Mem. 
is filed with the Registrar of Surrogate Bldg., London, Ont.; Institute Genea- 
Courts, Court House, Regina, Sask., logique Drouin, 4148 St. Denis Street, 
Canada. The wills are filed in the office Montreal, Quebec; Vancouver Dist. LDS 
of the clerk of the Surrogate Court of Gen. Society, 350 East 55th Ave., Van- 
the respective counties. Land Titles are couver 15, B. C. 



Denmark 



Denmark's (Danmark) principal is- Falster constitute the amt of Maribo. 

lands and peninsula: 1. Jutland (Jy- Bornholm Island with Ronne as the ad- 

lland); 2. Fyn Island; 3. Zealand (Sja- ministrative center is Bornholm Amt. 

Hand); 4. Falster and Lolland (Laa- The Faeroe (Faeroeren) Islands with 

land) Islands; 5. Bornholm Island. Thorshavn as its administrative center 

Jutland (Jylland) Peninsula has the (750 miles west of Norway and 400 miles 

following amter (counties); Aabenraa, ncrth of Scotland) have at times been 

Aalborg, Aarhus, Haderslev, Hjoring, considered as the Faeroe Amt. 

Randers, Ribe, Ringkobing (Ringkjob- The amter of Denmark in most cases 

ing), Sonderborg (Skanderborg), This- arr named after the cities which are 

ted. Tender, Vejle, and Viborg. their administrative centers. In fact all 

Fyn Island has two amter — Odense follow this pattern except Fredriksborg, 

Amt (County) and Svendborg Amt. which has Hillerbd as its administrative 

Zealand (Sjalland) Island is divided center, and Bornholm and Faeroe (men- 

as follows: Copenhagen (Kobenhavn), tioned above). 

Fredriksborg, Holbak, Prasto and Soro All census records, military levying rolls, 

amter. civil and government records are ga- 

The islands of Lolland (Laaland) and thered into one great central archive 



DENMARK 181 

at Copenhagen. This is the "Rigsar- cord for the genealogist in Denmark, 
kivet" or Royal Archive. All church The number of Danes not belonging 
records prior to 1890 are gathered into to the state church prior to 1890 is prac- 
the three permanent provincial archives tically negligible, thus making this re- 
located at Copenhagen, Odense, Viborg ord most valuable for marriages and 
and the one temporary provincial ar- deaths as well. 

chive at Aabenraa. These archives are The first church record preserved 

the most important for genealogical re- was made by a priest, Jost Poulsen, in 

search in Denmark, Of the two kinds Nakskov for the years 1572-90. Another 

of archives the provincial archive is the one was kept by a priest of the same 

more important to researchers for it place from 1618-1629. The oldest un- 

is here that the vital statistics are interrupted church record in Denmark 

kept for practically everything prior to is that of Holmen's Church in Copen- 

1890. hagen which began In 1617. Several 

There are other archives and libraries churches began keeping parish records 
that furnish valuable information for in 1641, and in 1645 all parishes were 
the genealogist. The Royal Library will asked by the government to keep re- 
probably stand first in this respect, cords of all births, marriages, deaths, 
Here will be found all printed records in etc. It was understood at this time that 
Denmark and also a few manuscript it became the duty of the parish priest 
records. This will, of course, save a to keep such a record and that this re- 
researcher a great deal of time, if he cord belonged to the parish and not to 
should find his records already printed the priest. Further enforcement was 
then all he needs to do is check-up on enacted in 1683 and 1685, such that be- 
the connections. Other archives worthy fore the end of the seventeenth century, 
of mention are the military archive at it was definite and practiced by prac- 
Copenhagen, the city and county ar- tically all of the priests, 
chives and libraries, the Danish-Amer- The birth records generally consists 
ican Archives at Aalborg which may ne of two separate lists: the male and the 
of great worth to Danish-Americans female. The information obtainable is 
in establishing their connections with the same for both, and consists of: the 
Denmark; also there are the industrial name of the child, date of birth, date 
archives, university archives, etc. of christening, name of the parents and 

In all of these archives thus men- their occupation, names of the god- 

tioned all records that are obtainable mother and the sponsors and possibly 

for the public are from 1890 and back, some remarks. 

None are obtainable after that date The confirmation record is also divid- 
except by special permission or rights ed into male and female lists. Confirm- 
but for those records that are there ation generally takes place between 
is no charge for the use of them in the fourteen and fifteen years of age. The 
reading-rooms of the archives. information obtainable from these re- 

CHURCH RECORDS. In Denmark cords is: name of child, name of par- 
most people belong to the same church, ents, date of confirmation, usually the 
the state or Lutheran church. It used date of either birth or chistening, and 
to be required of all to belong to this character testimonials from the school, 
church and to support it by means of a The marriage record or list gives the 
civil tax, but that is a thing of the past name of the bridegroom and the bride; 
now, as far as it being a requirement of generally their age or birthdate and the 
every person regardless of desire or parish they came from, if native of an- 
personal creed. However, this church other parish (marriage is performed in 
still remains the registrar of certain the parish which the bride come from), 
vital statistics. Thus, regardless of sometimes the names of the fathers are 
what church you may belong to, all given, the names of the sponsors who 
births must be registered with the priest are generally fathers or near, relatives 
of the state church of that particular (male) are always g ven, date of mar- 
parish in which you may be residing, riage and possible remarks and banns. 
All other vital statistics such as mar- The removal record or record of in- 
riages, deaths, etc., are either register- coming and outgoing members from the 
ed here or with the local civil author- parish, is a result of the system of 
ities. For this reason the state church character testimonial employed at one 
records become the most valuable re- time in Denmark. 



182 



THIRD EDITION OF THE HANDY BOOK FOR GENEALOGISTS 



The death record shows the name of of the deceased, or if a child the posi- 
the person deceased, possibly the name tion or occupation of the father or 
of the husband or wife or in the case mother. The age also is given, 
of a child the name of the father or PROBATE RECORDS. Probate re- 
even both the parents, date of death, cords have been in existence since the 
date of burial, position or occupation early part of the sixteenth century in 




DENMARK 183 

Denmark. In 1874 the old system was an extra tax was required of the 

done away with entirely. Most of the people. In most cases it just hit the 

earliest records have been lost or burnt, land-owners and other men with rath-^r 

however, records from 1574 to 1637 are large capitals or assets. But there 

at the archive. These are mostly for were times when it was required from 

cities since this system began much each family. In such cases a list was 

earlier there. After this period there made out of all the heads of families 

are many more in existence, and as which were to be taxed, 

the end of the sevententh century is Royal Library 

approached are found throughout the Genealogical research is greatly aided 

entire land. through the sources found in the Royal 

The Royal Archive Library. Here will be found all the 

The most important records found printed records, history, biography, etc. 

at this archive are the census records in Denmark. Various types of direc- 

and the military levying rolls. Other tories and short biographical sketches 

records such as tax lists, customs re- of important or more or less outstand- 

cords, commercial records, postal re- ing men of Denmark are found here, 

cords, pension records and other govern- Very valuable family histories are also 

mental records are also available. located here which many times can save 

CENSUS RECORDS. The first com- a researcher a great deal of time when 

plete census record which has not been his pedigree connects up with one of 

destroyed is that taken in 1787. Since these. 

that date census records have been tak- Military Archives 

en during the following years: 1801. The military archives at Copenhagen 

1834, 1840, 1845, 1850, 1855, 1860, 1870, will be of great help to any one search- 

1880, 1890, 1901 and thereafter period- ing names on a military line. Accurate 

ically. Of these all up to and includ- records are kept of all officers and sub- 

ing 1890 census are available to the officers in the nation's fighting force, 

public for their perusal and study at the Data generally given is mostly that 

reading room at the Royal Archive. concerning the person's military career. 

These censuses are listed according "Raadstuearkiver" — City Archives 

to parishes, "herreds," and "Amter." The city archive has several valuable 

The last two mentioned divisions are records, but that which is of greatest 

comparable to county and state within value to the genealogist is the record 

the United States. of marriage permits issued. 

MILITARY LEVYING ROLLS. Be- Other Records 

ginning with 1789 all males born out- Other records of value are wills, 

side of the cities in Denmark were deeds, divorces, civil marriages, death 

entered upon levying rolls so that they registrations at 'Tinghuset," etc. All 

could be used for military training records pertaining to wills, deeds and 

when they reached a certain age. It divorces in recent years are located at 

was required of each male individual to the head office of the Judicial District 

ever have his whereabouts known. Thus (Domekontoret) or at least information 

if he moved he had to report at his concerning their whereabouts could be 

new place of residence, where he came given here. Civil marriages will be with 

from and the one in charge of the the community government records as 

records for the place of his original well as with the civil confirmations, 

residence was notified in order that his Deaths are registered at "Tinghuset," 

name could be followed through these so information concerning deaths can 

records at any time. also be located here as well as from 

EXTRA TAX LISTS. Whenever some the church records, 

extraordinary situation arose in the See Scandinavia 

country wherein more money was need- (Much of above extracted from an arti- 

ed than that which could be supplied cle on Danish research by Henry E. 

by the government by ordinary means, Christensen.) 



England 



Write Letters First papers, write to old residents, to post- 

You can write letters to find relatives masters, to city and county officials, to 

who have genealogy, advertise in news- dealers in genealogical books, to names 



184 THIRD EDITION OF THE HANDY BOOK FOR GENEALOGISTS 

from directories, just the same in Eng- a township. A town may have several 
land as in America. If you expect to churches. To be a city in England there 
send a number of letters, write to some must be a cathedral, 
postmaster and send a money order for The Census of England and Wales 
some 2y2d. (2V2 penny) stamps. You can For nearly a hundred and fifty years 
then send a self-addressed, stamped en- the census has been taken each ten 
velope with your letter to help get a re- years. The only ones available for gen- 
ply. Or for 13 cents you can buy from ealogical research are those of 1841 and 
your postmaster a coupon which can be 1851. 

exchanged in England or any other coun- Prior to that time census enumerators 

try for a stamp to pay postage on the listed only the number of people living 

answer to your letter. at a given address. The census of 1841 

Searching Parish Registers tells names of family members, the ages 

Parish registers, which are the records of the nearest five years but does not tell 

of the Church of England, are valuable the exact place of birth. The census of 

sources of genealogical information. 1851 gives the names of each member 

They do not contain the records of of the family, their relationship to the 

Methodists, Quakers, etc. If your an- head of the family, the occupation of 

cestors belonged to those religions the each, the age and the parish where born, 

records of their churches must be search- It is necessary that the approximate 

ed for the desired information. address be known before a search can 

A few parish registers go back as begin, 
far as 1538, but most of them commence Information from the 1861 qensus 

at a later date. Between 1538 and 1 July and later enumerations are not open to 

1837 they are the principle sources of the public or their agents. They contain 

records of births, deaths and marriages practically the same information as the 

of every class of people in England. 1851 census. Upon written application the 

Burke's Key to the Ancient Parish Reg- Register General may make a search 

isters of England and Wales by Arthur for a particular family but it is necessary 

M. Burke, London 1908, lists alphabetical- to give him the precise address, the 

ly the names of the parishes in England surname of the person or persons resid- 

and Wales, giving also the name of the ing there and also a signed statement 

county and the dates of registration. It that the information from the census 

is not unusual to find gaps in the records will not be used for litigation. 
— periods when no registrations were The following is the address of the 

made or when they have been lost, office in charge of the census, Public 

Check each register to see if it covers Record Office, Chancery Lane, W. C. 2, 

completely the period you are interested London, England. They may suggest a 

in. professional genealogist if you enclose 

If you know the birthplace of your an- an international reply coupon which 

cestor you can often find his parents you may buy for 13 cents at your post 

and the date of his birth and marriage office. 

by searching the parish registers. The England Vital Statistics 
record of births or christenings gives Previous to 1837 the task of keeping 
only the given name of the mother but a record of vital statistics of England 
by searching the marriage record her and Wales was left almost entirely to 
surname can often be found. The burial the churches. Beginning on the first 
record also gives information that is day of July, 1837, the government has 
valuable. There are many thousands of kept a record of births, deaths and mar- 
parish registers, only a few of which riages. These records have been gather- 
have been printed. ed in one office and indexed so that 

If it is necessary to have the original anyone born in England or Wales, know- 
record searched you must engage an Eng- ing the date of his birth, can for a small 
lish genealogist to do it. It used to be fee obtain a birth certificate, etc. To 
that the Rector or the Vicar in the par- obtain information from this record 
ticular English church where the search write to the Register of Births, Marri- 
is to be made would do it, but not any ages and Death, Somerset House, Lon- 
more. The practice was ended on April 7, don, England. The fee for such service 
1952. is five shillings one penny, (a shilling is 

Parishes may be divided into town- about 15c). Thus if we know the full 

ships. A small parish may not have name of a person and his exact age 



ENGLAND 



185 



but do not know his parents or birth- 
place, the birth certificate will give this 
information. 



may find in your public or genealogical 
library. 

Berry> Wm., County Genealogies Pedi- 
grees of Berkshire, Pub. 1837, Gilbert and 



If the date is near 1851, you can refer p.p^j. Poternaster Row. London 
to the census and find the birthplace Cox, J. Charles, Notes on the Churches 
of the Darents and thus open the way ol Derbyshire, 4 Vol., Pub. 1875 by Bem- 
for searching the parish register. If rose and Sons, 10, Paternoster Bid. Gives 
you do not know the exact name and the early history of the ancient churches 
date of birth it will be hard to get in- and chapelries of Derbyshire County, 
formation from the record. Marshal, Dr. G. W., Marshall's Gene- 

Wills In England alogist's Guide, 1903, gives a list of publi- 

Wills are the backbone of genealog- cations which have, at various times printed 
ical research in England. The informa- material on English families. The families are 
tion they give is the most reliable, and arranged alphabetically and the publications 
you can often make up several family are coded with the page, volume, etc. 
group sheets from one will. So far as listed, enabling a person to quickly discovefl 
telling who belongs to which family if genealogical or historical material on that 
they are far better than the parish reg- line has appeared in print. This book along 
ister. After you have examined a will with A Genealogical Guide, which is a con- 
it is well to search a parish register to tinuation of this same idea for the period 
fill in the dates and complete the record. 1903 to 1953 (see Whitmore, J. B., below), 
Non-Parichial or Nonconformist are two of the most important books for 

Registers English researchers. 

In England and Wales each church Palmer, W. M. Monumental Inscriptions 
kept its own records. Those who did not and Coats of Arms from Cambridge, Pub. by 
belong to the Episcopal Church (Church Bowes and Bowes, Cambridge, 1932. 
of England) did not have their names Smith, Frank and Gardner, David E., 
mentioned in the parish registers. The Genealogical Research in England and 
registers of the Nonconformists or Dis- Wales, Vol. 1., Pub 1956, Bookcraft Pub- 
senters which include the Methodists, Bap- lishers, Salt Lake City, Utah. This book 
tists, Quakers, Presbyterians and some can be purchased through most genealogi- 
smaller groups were all, as far as pos- cal supply houses, including The Everton 
sible, gathered up and deposited in Som- Publishers, price $3.00. The authors have 
erset House, London. Most of these rec- been engaged in professional genealogical 
ords began about 1650 and continued to work for many years. Both were born in 
about 1850. To have these records search- England and handled and searched count- 
ed, address: The Registrar General, Gen- less parish and archive records in almost 
eral Register Office, Somerset House, every county in England before coming to 
London, England. When a search is to America to continue their genealogical ca- 
be made a description of the register reers. Their combined effort has brought 
must be given, also the name and the' forth a book that should be in the hands 
location of the chapel. For example, of every person seeking to do research in 
Register of births, from the Baptist Chap- England and Wales. 

el in Deerham, Norfolk, England. Also Thompson, T. R., A Catalogue of British 
give about the date. The fee for searching Family Histories, 1928, second edition 1935. 
when the application is made by mail Whitmore, T. R., A Genealogical Guide, 
is usually 2 shillings 6 pence for each Pub. 1953, John Whitehead & Son Ltd., 
volume. If your ancestor lived in Deer- Leeds. An index to British pedigrees in con- 
ham and you wish to try the other tinuation of Marshall's Genealogist's Guide, 
churches you can send and have the Bap- (1903). 

tist record searched. If that fails you Worthy, Chas, Esq., Devonshire Wills, 
may try the Quakers, etc. There will be a Pub. Benrose & Sons Ltd., London, 1896. A 
separate charge for each search. collection of annotated testimentary ab- 

Your research in England will be eased stracts, together with the family history and 
considerably by a study of the following genealogy of many of the most ancient 
books. Some may be purchased, others you gentle houses of the west of England. 



Counties of England 



Name 

Bedfordshire 
Berkshire 





Map 




Abbreviation 


Index 


County Town 


Beds. 


C7 


Bedford 


Berks. 


F8 


Reading 



186 THIRD EDITION OF THE HANDY BOOK FOR GENEALOGISTS 



^ r 



z < ul 

>• I o -J 

o m 



f 

z 



o 

uJ o. 
O 




J ,^^'< /st 



^':ir'«9wo 




ENGLAND 



187 




188 



THIRD EDITION OF THE HANDY BOOK FOR GENEALOGISTS 







Map 




Name 


Abbreviation 


Index 


County Town 


Buckinghamshire 


Bucks. 


G7 


Buckingham 


Cambridgeshire 


Cambs. 


H7 


Cambridge 


Cheshire (Chester Co.) 


Ches. 


E5 


Chester 


Cornwall 


Cornwall 


BIO 


Bodmin 


Cumberland 


Cumb. 


D3 


Carlisle 


Derbyshire 


Derby 


F5 


Derby 


Devonshire 


Devon 


C9 


Plymouth 


Dorsetshire 


Dorset 


E9 


Dorchester 


Durham 


Dur. 


F3 


Durham 


Essex 


Essex 


H8 


Clemsford 


Gloucestershire 


Glos. (Gloucs.) 


E8 


Gloucester 


Hampshire 


Hants. 


F9 


Winchester 


Herefordshire 


Herefs. 


E7 


Hereford 


Hertfordshire 


Herts. 


G8 


Hertford 


Huntingdonshire 


Hunts. 


G6 


Huntingdon 


Kent 


Kent 


H8 


Maidstone 


Lancashire (Lancaster Co.) 


Lanes. 


E4 


Lancaster 


Leicestershire 


Leics. 


F6 


Leicester 


Lincolnshire 


Lines. 


G5 


Lincoln 


London 


London 


G8 


London 


Middlesex 


Mx. 


G8 


London 


Monmouthshire 


Mont. 


D8 


Monmouth 


Norfolk 


Norfolk 


H6 


Norwich 


Northamptonshire 


Northants. 


G7 


Northampton 


Northumberland 


Northumb. 


E2 


Newcastle 


Nottinghamshire 


Notts. 


F6 


Nottingham 


Oxfordshire 


Oxon. 


F7 


Oxford 


Rutlandshire 


Rut. 


G6 


Oakham 


Shropshire 


Salop. (Shrops.) 


G6 


Shrewsbury 


Somersetshire 


Somerset 


D9 


Bristol 


Staffordshire 


Staffs. 


E6 


Stafford 


Suffolk 


Suffolk 


H7 


Ipswich 


Surrey 


Surrey 


G8 


Guilford 


Sussex 


Sussex 


H9 


Lewes 


Warwickshire 


War. (Warws.) 


E7 


Warwick 


Westmorelandshire 


Westmd. 


E3 


Appleby 


Wiltshire 


Wilts. 


F8 


Salisbury 


Worcestershire 


Worcs. 


E7 


Worcester 


Yorkshire 


York 


F4 


York 



Finland 



Administrative Departments of Finland (Suomi). 
Department Map Index Administrative 



Center 



1 Ahvenanmaa (Aland) D3 

2 Uusimaa D4 

3 Kymi C4 

4 Turu-Pori C3 

5 Hame C3 

6 Mikkeli C4 

7 Vaasa C3 

8 Kuopio C4 

9 Oulu B4 

10 Lappi A4 

Turku is the oldest Finnish City. It was founded by Swedes in 1157 and was 
the capital of Finland from 1809 to 1819. Helsinki, the present capital of Finland, 
was founded by Swedes in 1550. 

See Map Page 182 



Mariehamn (Maarianhamina) 

♦Helsinki (Helsingfors) 

Kptka 

Turku (Abo) 

Hameenlinna (Tavastehus) 

Mikkeli (Sankt Michel) 

Vaasa (Vasa) 

Kuopio 

Oulu (UleSborg) 

Kemi 



France 



The genealogical situation in France is Protestants are, relatively speaking, rare, 

quite different from the conditions in They are found in the Town Hall along 

England. We have the noble families with the other registers, 

in France as in England but unlike Eng- The Registers of "Insinuations" in 

land there was no law to prevent any which all notorial documents that were 

wealthy family from claiming nobility, subject to a tax had to be recorded is 

The feudal families, the Quasi-feudal, another good source of information, 
the noblemen created by the King, and Besides these, the National Library 
the public office holder of old — all and the National Archives together with 
claiming nobility — have many descen- the various departmental archives supply 
dants. Today it is said that 70,000 French- inexhaustable sources of information, 
men assume to be noblemen and not In these public archives are preserved 
more than 8,000 or 9,000 have any real thousands of manuscript volumes ex- 
title to that quality. tending back into the middle ages where 

The coat of arms, which is so help- the researcher might spend many months 

fu] in tracing pedigrees in England, was and still continue to find new things, 

also greatly overdone in France. The The above information was gleaned 

registration of coats of arms was taxed from a six page article in the Genealo- 

ai 20 livres per person. The collector of gists' Magazine, published in London, 

taxes compelled many persons not con- September, 1946. 

nected with the nobility to pay the tax Regarding printed genealogies the au- 

and assume a coat of arms. Over 60,000 thor has this comment: "Finally we have 

coats of arms are recorded. the printed sources, the genealogcial 

The earliest parish registers of births, works of the judges of arms and kings 
marriages and burials were written about genealogists, the monks of St. Maur such 
400 years ago. These registers were kept as Pere Anselme and a number of pro- 
by the parish priest who, beginning in fessional and amateur genealogists who 
about 1700 deposited copies of his regis- are more or less reliable, not to say 
ters with the Clerk of the Court. At the more or less honest or trustworthy . . , 
time of the revolution (1789) the task Unfortunately the only guide to the 
of recording births, marriages and deaths printed works on heraldry and genealo- 
was transferred to the Mairie (Town gy is the Bibliotheque heraldique de la 
Hall) where the parish priests were com- France by Joannis Guigard, published in 
pelled by law to deposit all the registers Paris in 1861. For later works one has to 
in his possession. The new registers wade through the printed or hand writ- 
( since 1789) are known as Registres de ten indexes of the National Library, 
I'Etate Civil. It is therefore to the Town which from my own experiences is a 
Hall that one should apply to con- tedious and not very satisfactory process." 
suit the records of births, marriages and He makes no mention at all of the 
deaths either prior to or subsequent to books which form the great bulk of 
the year 1789. The registers are kept genealogical literature in England and 
in the Registry Office of the Town Hall America. Neither does he mention gene- 
or in the Archives or in the Town Hall alogical libraries which play such an 
Library. Occasionally the Departmental important part in genealogical research 
Archivist has insisted on the transfer of in both England and America, 
the old parish registers to his Muniment In the closing paragraphs he tells us 
rooms when they have not been carefully that the Departmental Archivists are 
preserved in the Town Hall. There is most helpful as also as a rule are the 
usually an index provided for each vol- secretaries of the town halls in the im- 
ume. Only rarely is a register found that portant towns all over France where the 
dates back to 1600. War, fires, floods, old parish registers and the modern vital 
and the carelessness of parish priests are statistics are kept. At the National Li- 
all responsible for the loss of many par- brary and the National Archives one 
ish registers, in Paris the original reg- must rely entirely on the manuscript and 
isters and the duplicates up to 1860 were printed indexes. A letter of introduction 
destroyed by fire. Copies of a few of from the Embassy is required of those 
these registers had been made and these who would examine these indexes, 
are still preserved. Registers of the Incidentally he gives the name of a 

189 



190 THIRD EDITION OF THE HANDY BOOK FOR GENEALOGISTS 

firm of genealogists in Paris. Pelletier et Departments of France 

Pecquet, 18 Rue de Cherche-Midi, Paris Departments are listed alphabetical 
6, France. with the map index in parenthisis and 



Map of Departments of France 




1 ' ^ rOv 


3 • 4 






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r-^Aube \ '^ ^ ; 


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1 ^vJ^'^''°'^^^^cr+_\ 


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S -^*^ Vlusei Alpes 


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/ / G«rs ^V'^t Tarn \ 


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FRANCE 



191 



the department capital following. 

Ain (C4) Bourg; Aisne (A3) Laon; 
Allier (C3) Moulins; Alpes-Maritimes 
(D4) Nice; Andorra (Autonomous Re- 
public) (D3) Andorra la Veil; Ardeche 
(C3) Privas; Ardennes (A3) Mezi^res; 
Ariege (D2) Foix; Aube (B3) Troyes; 
Aude (D3) Carcassonne; Aveyron (C3) 
Rodez. 

Bas-Rhin (B4) Strasbourg; Basses- 
Alpes (D4) Digne; Basses-Pyrenees (D2) 
Pau; Belfort (B4) Belfort; Bouches-du- 
Rh5ne (D4) Marseille; Calvados (A2) 
Caen; Cantal (C3) Aurillac; Charente 
(C2) Angoul^me; Charente-Maritime 
(C2) La Rochelle; Cher (B3) Bourges; 
Corr^ze (C3) Tulle; Corse (an island SE 
of Var) Ajaccio; C0te-D'or (B3) Dijon; 
Cmes-du-Nord (Bl) St. Brieuc; Creuse 
(C3) Gueret. 

Deux-S^vres (B2) Niort; Dordogne 
(C2) Perigueux; Doubs (B4) Besancon; 
Drome (C4) Valence; Eure (A2) Evreux; 
Eure-et-Loir (B2) Chartres; Finist^re 
(Bl) Quimper; Card (D3) Nimes; Gers 
(D2) Auch; Gironde (C2) Bordeaux; 
Haute-Garonne (D2) Toulouse; Haute- 
Loire (C3) Le Puy; Haute-Marne (B4) 
Chaumont; Haute-Savoie (C4) Annecy; 
Haute-Sa5ne (B4) Vesoul; Hautes-Alpes 
(C4) Gap; Hautes-Pyrenees (D2) Tar- 
bes; Haute-Vienne (C2) Limoges; Haut- 
Rhin (B4) Colmar; Herault (D3) Mont- 
pellier. 

Ille-et-Vilaine (B2) Rennes; Indre (B2) 
Ch^teauroux; Indre-et-Loire (B2) Tours; 
Is^re (C4) Grenoble; Jura (B4) Lons- 
le-Saunier; Landes (D2) Mont-de-Mar- 
san; Loire (C3) St. Etienne; Loire-In- 
f^rieure (B2) Nantes; Loiret (B3) Or- 



leans; Loir-et-Cher (B2) Blois; Lot (C3) 
Cahors; Lot-et-Garonne (C2) Agen; 
Lozere (C3) Mende. 

Maine-et-Loire (B2) Angers; Manche 
(A2) St. LS; Marne (A3) Chalons-sur- 
Marne; Mayenne (B2) Laval; Meurthe- 
et-Moselle (B4) Nancy; Meuse (A4) 
Bar-le-Duc; Monaco (Principality) (D4) 
Monaco; Morbihan (Bl) Vannes; Moselle 
(A4) Metz; Ni^vre (B3) Nevers; Nord 
(A3) Lille; Oise (A3) Beauvais; Orne 
(B2) Alecon; Paris (B3) — ; Pas-de-Calais 
(A3) Arras; Puy-de-D6me (C3) Cler- 
mont-Ferrand; Pyrenees- Orientales (D3) 
Perpignan. 

Rh6ne (C3) Lyon; Sa^ne-et-Loire (B3) 
M^con; Sarthe (B2) Le Mans; Savoie 
(C4) Chambery; Seine-et-Marne (B3) 
Melun; Sein-et-Oise (B3) Versailles; 
Sein-Inferieure (A2) Rouen; Somme (A3) 
Amiens; Tarn (D3) Albi; Tarn-et-Gar- 
onne (D2) Montauban; Var (D4) Dragui- 
gnan; Vaucluse (D4) Avignon; Vendee 
(B2) La Roche-sur-Yon; Vienne (C2) 
Poitiers; Vosges (B4) Epinal; Yonne (B3) 
Auxerre. 

Former Provinces of France 
1, Flanders; 2, Artois; 3, Picardy; 
4, Normandy; 5, He de France; 6, Cham- 
pagne; 7, Lorraine; 8, Alsace; 9, Brit- 
tany; 10, Maine; 11, Oreanais; 12, Bur- 
gundy; 13, Franche-Comtg; 14, Anjou; 
15, Touraine; 16, Berry; 17, Nivernais; 
18, Poitou; 19, Marche; 20, Bourbonnais; 
21, Aunis; 22, Saintonge; 23, Angoumois; 
24, Limousin; 25, Auvergne; 25A, Ly- 
onais; 26, Dauphin; 27, Guyenne; 28, 
Gascony; 29, Beam: 30, Foix; 31, Rous- 
sillon; 32, Languedoc; 33, Comtat; 34, 
Provence. 



Germany 



The German people during the past 
several centuries have been a record 
keeping people. Some church records have 
information since early in the sixteenth 
century. Birth, Marriage, and death re- 
cords are generally available since the 
nineteenth century. Census records have 
also been kept for many years, as have 
parish and Protestant church records. 
In some provinces the real estate records 



are among the most valuable. Burger 
rolls, tax lists, and police registers as- 
sist in giving accurate identification 
The German police method of keeping 
track of every individual arriving in 
any city or locality, is important in 
tracing individuals or families from one 
city to another. 

To most Americans interested in Ger- 
man genealogy it is neccessary to employ 



192 



THIRD EDITION OF THE HANDY BOOK FOR GENEALOGISTS 



researchers in Germany. They can be 
located in many German cities. Care 
should be taken to secure reliable help, 
researchers who subscribe to the highest 
genealogical practices and ideals. 

A great deal of information and many 
records from Germany are now on file 
in the library of the Genealogical So- 
ciety of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah. 
Those not acquainted with the research 
situations in Germany may find it ad- 
vantagous to correspond with that of- 



fice before employing a researcher 
MILITARY OCCUPATION ZONES OF 
GERMANY 
Some controversy and confusion arises 
when one attempts to name, locate and 
established the capitals of the state and 
zones of Germany. The accompanying 
map has the boundries and capitols simi- 
lar to those found in Hammond's Ambas- 
sador World Atlas, published by C. S. 
Hammond & Co. Maplewood, N. J., Third 
Printing 1956. We quote from The New 



States of Germany 






1 » 2 


\ 


3 ' 


4 






I j\^*^ 








A 




S\2 


/l^iefj 










r^ 


^■1 


MECkLENBUHG V..^^ 








1 Y^ ^^ie£g^^N 




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B 




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c 


"\ Si 


\ 






^\ >/V f ^0 •HannoverX 


scnsHH. \ ^^^ 


s 








} 


^^ BKANDENBUKG 


\ 






\ NORDRHEIN-WESTFALEN Jk 


X 


Halle_ ^ ' 


\ 


C 




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N-V^ V Dresden. e* 


J 






*7 2°""^y^ J (HESSE) f 


thOkinghn S <^ y— ^ 


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OcTT PFALZ (Zit <i^ 

w^ V ^\ Mainz \ \ 




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D 


£ 
> 


\r^-^'><„^_^/ .BADEN S 

,^ /C/V SJuttgart ) 


BAYERN ^N 

(BAVARIA) \ 

Mtlnchen ^^ 




E 




U-^ 


u 


^^ 





GERMANY 193 

Funk & Wagnalls Encyclopedia, Uni- which consists of the former state of 
corn Publishers, Inc., N. Y., 36 Vols. 1951, Bavaria, a part of the former Prussian 
and The Columbia-Viking Desk Encyclo- province, the Palatinate, and the town 
pedia, Published by The Viking Press, and district of Lindau; Wiirttemberg- 
N Y 2 Vols 1953 Baden; Hessen; and Bremen. The capi- 
This from Funk and Wagnalls: France: tals of these states are respectively 
The French zone comprises parts of the Munich, Stuttgart, Wiesbaden, and Bre- 
fcrmer states of Prussia, Baden, Hessen, ^^J}-. ^ ^ , u. ,r-i • • -.n^r* 
and Wlirtemburg, and all of the Saar- ^ This from Colunibm-Viking: in 1949 
land. For administrative purposes, the ^wo separate republics came into ex- 
zone has been divided into four states, ^^^^^^^' (1> federal Republic of (West) 
namely Rhineland - Palatinate, Baden, Germany, temporary capital, Bonn, un- 
Wurtembarg-Hohenzollem, and the Saar. der U. S., British, and French occupa- 
The capitals of these states are respec- tion, consisting of the states of Bavaria, 
tively Coblenz, Frieburg, Tubigen, and Wurttemberg-Baden, Hesse, and Bremen 
Saarbrucken . . . United Kingdom: The <U.S. zone); North Rhine-Westphalia, 
British zone consists of the former state Lower Saxony, Schleswig-Holstein, and 
of Hamburg, portions of the former Hamburg (British Zone); Rhineland- 
state of Prussia, and the former states Palatinate, Wiirttemberg-Hohenzollern, 
of Brunswick, Oldenburg, Schaumburg- and Baden (French zone); and W. Ber- 
Lippe, and Lippe. For administrative lin. (2) (East) German Democratic Re- 
purposes the zone has been divided into public, capital E. Berlin, under Russian 
four states, namely Schleswig-Holstein, occupation, consisting of the states of 
Lower Saxony, North Rhine-Westpha- Brandenburg, Mecklenberg, Thuringia, 
lia, and Hamburg. The capitals of these Saxony, and Saxony-Anhalt. 
states are respectively Kiel, Hanover, It should be remembered regarding 
Dlisseldorph, and Hamburg . . . Union of Germany and most of the other Euro- 
Soviet Socialist Republics: The Soviet P^'an countries that the spelling of 
zone consists of the former states of many of the place names in their na- 
Saxony, Thuringia, Mecklenburg and tive language is different than the Eng- 
Anhalt, and portions of the former state lish spelling. For instance in Germany 
of Prussia, including the provinces of Pflaz means the Palatinate; Bayern is 
Silesia and Pomerania. For Adminis- Bavaria; Munchen is Munich; Nord- 
trative purposes, the zone has been rhein is North Rhine; Sachsen is Sax- 
divided into five states, namely Bran- ony; Koblenz is Coblenz, etc. 
denburg, Saxony, Saxony-Anhalt, Thur- THE THIRD REICH ADMINISTRATIVE 
ingia, and Mecklenburg. The capitals DIVISIONS 
of these states are respectively. Pots- The sixteen administrative divisions 
dam, Dresden, Halle, Weimer, and of the Third Reich in 1937 were Anhalt, 
Schwerin . . . United States: The Ameri- Baden, Bavaria, Bremen, Brunswick, 
can zone comprises the former states Hamburg, Hesse, Lippe, Mecklenberg, 
of Bavaria and Bremen and parts of Oldenburg, Prussia, Saarland, Saxony, 
the former states of Prussia, Baden, Schaumburg-Lippe, Thuringia, and Wiirt- 
Wurtemberg, and Hessen. For adminis- temburg. Liibeck, which had held the 
trative purposes, the zone has been di- status of a city-state, was merged with 
vided into four states, namely Bavaria, Prussia in March, 1937. 



Ireland 



Genealogical Research In Ireland Record Office in London) in 1922, Irish 
Only a very few Irish records have records have been so sparse that con- 
been published. Most of the original nected research is out of the question, 
records were gathered in Dublin. In 1882 (except in the case of well known fam- 
a big fire destroyed them. Others were ilies figuring in the standard reference 
destroyed in the recent civil war in 1922. books.)" 

The Society of Genealogists in London A general index for the vital statis- 

recently wrote us as follows: "Since tics for all of Ireland is at the Cus- 

the destruction of the Four Courts in tom House, Dublin, Ireland. There are 

Dublin, (the equivalent of the Public birth, marriage and death records from 



194 



THIRD EDITION OF THE HANDY BOOK FOR GENEALOGISTS 



1864. Protestant marriage records avail- 
able only since 1845. Northern Ireland 
has kept its registers separately since 
1922. 

Since 1708 land records and deeds 
have been filed at the Land Registry, 
Henrietta Street, Dublin. Two Indexes 
have been made for these records — one 
under the surname of the property own- 
er, the other under the township or 



property name. These records are be* 
ing microfilmed. 

Indexed records of wills filed in the 
Prerogative Court of Armagh for all 
Ireland by testators owning land in 
more than one diocese are available. 
They are also microfilmed. Wills re- 
lating to property in one diocese only 
were proved in the diocesan court. Each 
court file is indexed separately. 



County Map of Ireland 







IRELAND 195 

Ireland Provinces & Counties Belfast; Carlow (D3) Carlow; Cavan (B3) 

Ireland is divided into four provinces Caven; Clare (D2) Ennis; Cork (E2) 
which in turn are divided into 32 coun- Cork; Cork (County Borough (E2) Cork; 
ties and four county boroughs. Each Donegal (Ancient Name Tryconnel also 
county borough is a separate admini- O'Donnell's Country) (A2) Lifford; 
strative district and each one is also the Down (B4) Downpatrick; Dublin (C4) 
^ ^^ ^. Dublin; Dublin (County Borough) (C4) 

county town of one of the counties. j^^^y,^. Fermanagh (B3) Enniskillen; 

Ulster Province is divided between N. calway (CD Galway; Kerry (El) Tralee; 
Ireland (counties Antrim, Down, Ar- Kildare (C3) Naas; Kilkenny (D3) Kil- 
magh, Fermanagh, Tyrone, and London- kenny; Laoighis (Leix) (Formerly 
derry) and republic (counties Monaghan, Queen's) (D3) Portlaoighise; Leitrim 
Cavan, and Donegal). Other three prov- (B3) Carwick-on-Shannon; Leix (see 
inces are in republic — Leinster has coun- Laoighis); Limerick (D2) Limerick; Lim- 
ties Louth, Meath, Dublin, Kildare, Wick- erick (Luimneach) (County Borough) 
low, Carlow, Wexford, Longford; Mun- (D2) Limerick; Londonderry (A3) Lon- 
ster Province has Tipperary, Waterford, donderry; Longford (C3) Longford; 
Cork, Kerry, Limerick, and Clare; Con- Louth (B4) Dundalk; Mayo (Bl) Castle- 
naught Province has Leitrim, Roscommon, bar; Meath (C4) Trim; Monaghan (B3) 
Galway, Mayo, and Sligo. Monaghan; Offaly (C3) Tullamore; Ros- 

Counties and County Boroughs of Ireland common (C2) Roscommon; Sligo (B2) 
(Counties are listed alphabetical with the Sligo; Tipperary (D3) Clonmel; Tyrone 
map index in parenthisis and the county (B3) Omagh; Waterford (E3) Water- 
town following.) ford; West Meath (C3) Mullingar; Wex- 
Antrim (A4) Belfast; Armagh (B4) ford (D4) Wexford; Wicklow (D4) Wick- 
Armagh; Belfast (County Borough) (A4) low. 



Italy 



ITALY bald F. Bennett, its executive secretary. 

During 1947 and 1948 the records The records from sixteen parishes were 

^ T>- ^ 4- T4^ 1 • *•! J photographed, including the years 1690 

from Piedmont, Italy, were microfilmed f ^^^^ r\ ■e■^ ^- 

"" to 1940. One film contains as many as 

foi the Genealogical Society of Utah ^ggg p^ges. There are several films 

under the personal direction of Archi- available. 

Netherlands 

Capital — The Hague ('s Gravenhage) 

The early history of Holland has been Many Hollanders have come to the 

one of troubles and wars, in all of United States and are now living in 

which the determination of the people various parts of the nation. Michigan 

to rule themselves has been paramount, and Illinois have many of these indus- 

In religious affairs they have always trious people within their borders. Since 

leaned heavily toward Protestantism. 1861 more than four thousand Holland- 

T'Vio r^ofi^r, rr;„«o fi-^^^^i^i c,.^..^v,+ +^ ^^^ havc made their homes in Utah. 

Ihe nation gives financial support to „, .. , ^ x- ^- ^ n ^ ^-l 

^^ The vital statistics of all of the prov- 

several religious organizations. i^ces are being microfilmed under the 

Since 1811 vital records have been direction of the Genealogical Society 

kept, giving detail information about of Utah. South Holland and Groningen 

each individual. records have been filmed and work is 

Since 1850 the Bevolkingsregister progressing in other provinces, 
(population register) has kept informa- Several trained Holland researchers 
tion as to the movements of each in- are connected with the Genealogical So- 
dividual, ciety of Utah. 



196 THIRD EDITION OF THE HANDY BOOK FOR GENEALOGISTS 



Province Map of Netherlands and Belgium 



TT 



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yP ^y^ M Gron 



Leeuviz 



ni-ngen 



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.^IbSLAND 







Assen 



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Gent CGand) 

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^asselt, 



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lies 
1) 



KABANt A 



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country 
of 



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NETHERLANDS 



197 



Netherlands is divided into eleven provinces. Each province controls its own archive. 
Name Map Index Capital 



Drenthe 


B4 


Assen 


Friesland 


A3 


Leeuwarden 


Gelderland 


C3 


Arnhem 


Groningen 


A4 


Groningen 


Limburg 


D4 


Maastricht 


Noord (North) Brabant 


D3 


Hertogenbosch 


Noord (North) Holland 


B2 


Haarlem 


Overijssel (Overyssel) 


B4 


Zwolle 


Utrecht 


C3 


Utrecht 


Zealand 


D2 


Middleburg 


Zuid (South) Holland 


C2 


*'s Gravenhage (The Hague) 



Norway 



Administrative Districts (Counties) of Norway (Norge) are called Fylkers as 
follows: 

Administrative Center 

Kristiansand 

Arendal 

Stavanger 

Skien 

Tonsberg 

Moss 

*Oslo 

*Oslo 

Drammen 

Bergen 

Bergen 

Hermansverk 

Lilliehammer 

Hamar 

Molde 

Trondheim 

Steinkjer 

Bodo 

Tromso 

Vadso 



Fylker 


Map Index 


1 Vestager 


Dl 


2 Aust-Agder 


Dl 


3 Rogaland 


Dl 


4 Telemark 


Dl 


5 Vestfold 


D2 


6 'Ostfold 


D2 


7 Akershus 


D2 


8 Oslo 


D2 


9 Buskerud 


Dl 


10 Hordaland 


Dl 


11 Bergen 


Dl 


12 Sogn og Fjordane 


CI 


13 Opland 


CI 


14 Hedmark 


CI 


15 More og Romsdal 


CI 


16 Sor-Tr6ndelag 


C2 


17 Nord-Trondelag 


C2 


18 Nordland 


B2 


19 Troms 


A3 


20 Finnmark 


A3 




See Map Page 182 



Scandinavia 



Included in this designation should be 
Sweden, Finland, Norway, Denmark, and 
Iceland. Years ago Finland was part 
of Sweden and many Swedish families 
moved there. They have been perpetuat- 
ed since then in Finland, and the pre- 
sent generations look upon Finland as 
their original country. There are also 
Finns and Russians living in Finland, 
but their names and languages are 
entirely different. The present Iceland- 



ers have descended from the three Scan- 
dinavian peoples, but mainly from the 
Danish. 

At different times over the centuries, 
Norway has been part of either Den- 
mark or Sweden. It wasn't until 1905 
that it became a kingdom of its own, 
when a Danish prince was invited to be- 
come King of Norway. 

The three languages are enough alike 
that they can be understood by people 



198 THIRD EDITION OF THE HANDY BOOK FOR GENEALOGISTS 

of all three countries, although the dia- and son's name is Ola or Jens, or 

lects in different sections of each one of Svend, or Carl, the full name of the 

^, ^, . . V, +u 4. son would be Ola Hansen, or Jens Han- 

the three countries vary so much that ^^ ^„^ xj^,, ^^ ^v, ^'^^^ xjo«^^., 

•^ sen, or Svend Hansen, or Carl Hansen. 

they are not understood in every section ^he same is true in Swedish families, 

of the country. The dialects of the coun- with the exception that there the name 

try sections are nothing like the city dia- ending is "sson" instead of "sen" as in 

lects, and cities vary in different sec- the Norwegian and the Danish. How- 

tions of the country. ever, among Scandinavians in America 

Until about 1880 the most common this name ending is not adhered to 

method of giving surnames was for as strictly as it was years ago. Among 

the children to take the father's first Swedish families the "sson" may have 

name or given name and add to it become "son," but never "sen". Many 

"ssen", or "sen", or "sson". For instance, Norwegian or Danish name endings, 

if the father's first name was Ronald, are "son" instead of "sen". In Iceland 

his children's surname would be Ronald- the name endings are like that in Swe- 

ssen or Ronaldsson; if Erick, Erickssen den, "sson," as Gislasson, Thordarsson, 

or Ericksson; If Johan, Johanssen or Sveinsson, Valgardsson, etc. 

Johansson; if Niels or Nils, Nielssen or Books: 

Nilsson. if Ingvar, Ingvarssen or In- Nelson, O. N., Ph.D., History o[ the 

gvarsson, etc. Scandinavians in the United States 2 Vols. 

The patronymic method of naming per- O N. Nelson & Co., Minneapolis, Minn. 

sons is not so difficult to comprehend 1904. 

as some seem to believe. For instance, Hokanson, Nels, Swedish Immigrants in 

if the father's name is Hans Sorensen Lincoln's Time, Harper & Bros., New York. 



Scotland 



Research In Scotland Permission for a general search, that 

Unlike the conditions in England, the is a search that is not limited to one 
parish registers in Scotland have all person or to one census will be grant- 
been gathered in one building in Edin- ed only to responsible officials or local 
burgh. Besides the parish registers, authorities engaged in making search 
there is a wealth of other records in for public purposes, and to other spec- 
Edinburgh which may be searched. Very ially approved applicants. A general 
few of the Scottish records have been search must not exceed six hours and 
printed. It is usually best to hire a must be completed within two days. The 
genealogist to do the searching. cost is One Pound (about $3.00) which 

Before engaging help perhaps you covers the cost of the extract. Each 
should inquire from the Genealogical So- additional extract costs two shilUngs six 
ciety of Utah, Salt Lake City, what micro- pence. The office force does not do 
film records from that country are the searching in a general search. When 
available and if assistance can be ob- you write for your application blank 
tained to search them. ask for the name of a searcher. 

The Census of Scotland The earliest vital registers of Scot- 

The census of Scotland was taken the land have a starting date of 1538 but 
same years and contained the same in- most of them did not start until much 
formation as the census of England. In later, the majority having their incep- 
Scotland the census returns of 1841, 1851, tion between 1640 and 1700. 
1861 and 1871 may be searched. Written When writing for information it is 
application must be made for permission very important that the birth date be 
to search the census. For application given also the locality and occupation 
blanks write to the Registrar General, of the deceased. The law requiring regis- 
New Register House, Edinburgh, Scot- tration of births, deaths and marriages 
land. The fee for a particular search, was passed in 1855. 

that is a search for one person or house- The Old Registration House in Edin- 
hold at one census and at one certain burgh has among others the following 
address, is ten shillings. If the address records: Wills and Deeds, 1514 to present; 
is good enough this search will be made Land and Housing records (real estate 
by the office force without extra charge, transfers), 1550 to present; Lyon Court 



SCOTLAND 



199 



County Map of Scotland 




200 



THIRD EDITION OF THE HANDY BOOK FOR GENEALOGISTS 



Records (King-of-Arms) ; Guild regis- 
trations (tradesmen); Poll Tax (regis- 
tration of males of over 16 for military 
service) ; Registration of University grad- 
uates of the Universites of Edinburgh, 
Glasgow, St. Andrew's and Aberdeene. 
COUNTIES OF SCOTLAND 

Counties are listed alphabetically with 
the map index in parenthisis and the 
county seat following. 

Aberdeen (C4) Aberdeen; Angus (or 
Forfar) (D4) Forfar; Argyll (D2) In- 
veraray; Ayr (F3) Ayr; Banff (C4) 
Banff; Berwick (E4) Duns; Bute (E2) 
Rothesay; Caithness (B3) Wick; Clack- 
mannan (E3) Clackmannan; Dumbarton 



(E2) Dumbarton; Dumfries (F3) Dum- 
fries; East Lothain (E4) Haddington; 
Fife (D4) Cupar; Iverness (C3) Iver- 
ness; Kincardine (D4) Stonehaven; Kin- 
ross (E3) Kinross; Kirkcudbright (F3) 
Kirkcudbright; Lanark (E3) Lanark; 
Midlothain (E4) *Edinb;urgh; Moray 
(C3) Elgin; Narin (C3) Narin; Orkney 
(A3) Kirkwall; Peebles (E4) Peebles; 
Perth (D3) Perth; Renfrew (E3) Ren- 
frew; Ross & Cromarty (C2) Dingwall; 
Roxburgh (F4) Jedburgh; Selkirk (E4) 
Selkirk; Shetland see Zetland; Suther- 
land (B3) Dornoch; West Lothain (E3) 
Linlithgow; Wigtown (F3) Wigtown; 
Zetland (B4) Lerwick. 



South Africa 



The Cape Settlement was established 
by the Dutch East India Co. as a "half 
way house" between Europe and India, 
under the command of Jan van Riebeeck, 
who arrived in Table Bay on the 6 April, 
1652. Ten years later van Riebeeck was 
appointed commander to the Government 
at Malacca and the muster rolls of the 
Cape Settlement showed it had grown to 
several hundred inhabitants during his 
tenure of office. The Cape settlement 
continued under the rule of this trading 
company for about 140 years, gradually 
growing from within and without. The 
Netherlands, of course, supplied most of 
the immigrants but French refugees also 
came in considerable numbers as well 
as numerous Germans, a few Swiss and 
others. 

The first British occupation occurred 
in 1795 but not until 1806 did they wrest 
it permanently from the Dutch. In 1820 
under sponsorship of the British Govern- 
ment over 3,000 English settlers arrived 
at Algoa Bay (Port Elizabeth), becoming 
the nucleus of the English speaking peo- 
ple of South Africa. The start of the 
great trek of the Boers (South African 
descendants of the Dutch), came in 1836. 
They traveled north and east with the 
object of settling outside the sphere of 
British control. Gradually they found 
their way to Natal, Orange Free State 
and Transvaal, which with the Cape 
Province, after much tribulation and 
war, now form the Union of South Africa. 
Published Genealogies 

The oldest and largest published 
genealogical works is that of Christoffel 



Coetzee de Villiers, "Geslacht-Register 
der Oude Kaapsche Familien" (Genera- 
tion Index of the Old Cape Families) 
which was published in three volumes in 
1893-4. This is an excellent reference 
book but should be checked with original 
or other sources where possible as it has 
some mistakes. Another useful gen- 
ealogical work is "Personalia of the 
Germans at the Cape, 1652-1806" by Dr. 
J. Hoge, which was published as the 1946 
issue of the "Archives Year Book for 
South African History." This publication 
attempts to give a complete list of the 
Germans and Swiss who came to the Cape 
in the service of the Dutch East India Co. 
during the period 1652 till 1806. It lists 
as sources manuscripts in the Cape sec- 
tion of the Government Archives and 
Archives of the Dutch Reformed Church. 

Other good sources are: "The French 
Refugees at the Cape" by Col. Graham 
Botha (1919); "Precis of the Archives of 
the Cape of Good Hope" in two vol., 
consisting of Reque^ten (Memorials) 
1715-1806; "De Afkomst der Boeren" by 
Dr. H. J. Colenbrander contains a list of 
many of the early marriages of the set- 
tlers, with birthplaces of the wives — some- 
times not otherwise obtainable "The 
Story of the British Settlers of 1820 in 
South Africa" lists all the settlers of 
1820 and gives their ages as of that year. 

The histories and genealogies of some 
individual families have been compiled, 
some of them being: "Genealogy Jacob 
Izaak de Villiers and his wife Johanna 
Margaretha Muller of Waltevreeden, 
Dist. of Paarl" by D. F. Bosman; "His- 
tory of the Malan de Merindol' compiled 



SOUTH AFRICA 201 

by Henry Victor Malan (1836) and revis- with the Master of the Supreme Court, 
ed by James John Malan (1950); ''Record The charge made for a certified copy of 
of the Caldecott Family of South Africa"; a Death Notice is 6s 6d. If the complete 
"Jan Van Riebeeck Zijn Voor-en Nages- will is wanted, write for cost. Cape Prov- 
lacht" (his ancestors and posterity) pub- ince wills and Deceased Estate records 
lished 1952 by the Netherlands govern- (Death Notices) from 1689 to 1833 are 
ment gives many South African descend- kept in the Union Archives and from 1834 
ants of the leader of the first European to date in the Master's Office of the 
Colony south of the tropic of Capricorn. Supreme Court — the address of both is 
State Records Queen Victoria Street, Capetown, C. P. 

Laws requiring the registration of South Africa. In Natal the Master of the 
births, deaths and marriages were passed Supreme Court has wills dating back to 
in Natal in 1868, in the Cape Province 1852 and Deceased Estates from 1872 to 
in 1895, in the Orange Free State and date — the address is Pietermaritzburg, 
Transvaal in 1902. Prior to these dates Natal, Souht Africa. Deceased Estate rec- 
it was optional with parents as to wheth- ords in the Master's Office in the Orange 
er they had the births of their children Free State started in 1850 — the address 
registered or not. Survivors had the same is Bloemfontein, OFS, South Africa. The 
option with the registration of deaths, address of the Master's Office in the 
The registration of marriages started Transvaal is Pretoria, Tvl., South Africa, 
some years before that of births and Their records start in 1872. 
deaths in all the provinces except Natal. It must be remembered that sometimes 
Births, marriage and death certificates estates are settled many years after 
may be obtained from the local registrar death occurred and that most of the 
or from the Registrar of Births, Mar- estates are indexed according to the year 
nages and Deaths, Dept. of Int. Pretoria, they are filed. Also, none of the public 
South Africa. Birth certificates are of record offices have facilities for doing 
little value to the genealogists of South research, making it necessary to use 
Alrica, however, as the information given care in giving information as to what is 
on them is restricted by law to the wanted and what year it may be found 
name, place and date of birth of the v/hen asking for certificates. In the case 
registrant — the price is 2s 6d. Full birth of birth certificates, the date and place 
certificates, giving the name, place and of birth must be given, also the names 
date of birth, also the names, ages, place of parents. If the record is not found in 
of birth and marriage of parents, may be that year, an additional charge of 2s 6d 
had only by applicants residing outside is made for searching the year before 
the Union of South Africa — the price be- and the year following the one given, 
ing 5s. (s — Shilling, abt. 15 cents; d — but no longer search than for the three 
penny, abt. iy2 cents) years will be made on one application. 

The marriage certificate gives the Church Records 

names of each party, the date and place The church records in the Archives of 
of marriage, the country of birth and the Dutch Reformed Church (Nederduits- 
the age of each. The death certificate Hervormde of Gereformeerde Kerk, 
gives the name, date and place of death, claiming 85% of the membership of the 
age at death and birthplace. In the case Dutch Reformed Church in South Africa) 
of children who died under 10 years of are of great value to historical and gene- 
age, it also gives the names of the alogical researchers. They have baptism 
parents. The cost of a marriage certifi- and other records dating back to 1665 
cate or death certificate is 2s 6d. and it has been the aim of the church 

In the Union of South Africa they have to gather all their church records up to 
what they call a "Death Notice" which about 1875 to this repository. However, 
is completed on the filing of a will or some of the local churches still have 
on the settlement of deceased estate, their records from inception and, of 
These are very valuable for genealogists course, inquiries on recent records must 
as they list, when properly executed, the also be made locally. Baptism Certifi- 
following information: name, age, birth- cates may be had for 2s 6d, membership 
place, date and place of death, names of certificates for 2s 6d, and marriage cer- 
spouse, parents and children. The law tificates for 6s 6d. Address inquiries to 
requires that all estates over ten pounds Dutch Reformed Church Archives, 44 
sterling be probated, also that all wills Queen Victoria Street, Capetown, C. P., 
of estates under that amount be filed South Africa, or to locality where your 



202 



THIRD EDITION OF THE HANDY BOOK FOR GENEALOGISTS 



people came from. 

The records of other churches 
are kept mostly in the local churches and 
inquiries should be directed to them. 

The Union Archives at Pretoria, Pieter- 
maritzburg, Bloemfontein and Capetown, 
though not staffed sufficiently to do re- 
search, have many wonderful old records 
which are veritable "gold mines." In 
some cases the old church records have 
been removed to the State Archives as in 
Pietermaritzburg where they have bap- 



tismal and marriage records kept by the 
"Predikants" as they crossed the plains 
with the Voortrekkers. Also the Marriage 
Register— 1837 to 1912 of the Dutch Re- 
formed Church of that locality. 

The South African Mission of the 
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day 
Saints, with headquarters at "Cumorah" 
Main Rd., Mowbray, C. P., South Africa, 
has a card index file of about 15,000 
names which is growing continually as 
members in South Africa send in all in- 
formation on their personal lines. 



Sweden 



Research In Sweden 

The primary source of genealogical 
information in Sweden, as elsewhere, 
is the church record. These records are 
recognized to be among the best in Eur- 
ope. If your ancestors whose information 
you want lived within the past century 
their records would be in the church of 
the community in which they lived. If 
the desired data is older than that then 
the search should be conducted in the 
landsarkiv in that particular section of 
the country. 

The major archive in Sweden is Riks- 
arkivet, located in Stockholm and hous- 
ing most of the material of national im- 
portance. Besides that there are five 
main provincial archives, known as lands- 
arkiven, serving the various sec- 
tions of the country. They are located at 
Harnosand in the province of Anger- 
manland on the Gulf of Bothnia; at 
Uppsala in Uppland, the seat of the 
Archbishop of the Swedish Lutheran 
church; at Gothenburg (Goteborg) on 
the west coast; at Vadstena in the prov- 
ince of Ostergotland, a short distance 
south-west of Motala on the east coast 
of the large lake Vattern, and at Lund 
in the'^ravince of Skane, a short dis- 
tance north-east of Malmo, Sweden's 
third largest city. 

As mentioned previously, the most im- 
portant source of genealogical informa- 
tion is the church which your ancestors 
attended in their hdme community. 
Since there are more than 2,550 of these 
local churches in Sweden, you recognize 
the necessity of your knowing the cor- 
rect name and locality of the church 
in which you are interested. Since there 
is a repitition of names of localities and 
churches, you should know in which Ian 



or province it is located. Just the name 
of the province is not enough. This in- 
formation is necessary tor you to have 
whether you hire a professional gene- 
alogist to do the work for you, or you 
search the available Swedish microfilms 
yourself. 

It is very rare to find Swedish records 
earlier than 1686 although some have 
been found as early as 1610. If your 
lines run into those of more important 
families you may find them much ear- 
lier. 

Among the different records that may 
be found in most churches Male Bap- 
tisms, Female Baptisms, Male Confir- 
mations, Female Confirmations, Mar- 
riages, Incoming Members, Outgoing 
Members, Visitations (Husforhorslang- 
der), Male Deaths, Female Deaths, and 
General Index. 

Marriage banns are recorded in the 
church of the bride. 

Papers filed in the District Court (Har- 
adsratten) are also important records 
for the genealogical researcher. Among 
available records in these offices are 
the Inventories (losoreforteckning), 
Wills (testamenter), census records 
(mantalslangder), and public records of 
land (jordebockerna). 

One of the bugaboos to the novice re- 
searcher of Swedish genealogy is the 
patronymic system in vogue in Sweden 
until about 1890. Patronymics were 
used in many other sections of the world. 
Patronymic indicates a name derived 
from the father or ancestors. Here are 
examples of patronymics from different 
parts of the world: Tydides, the son of 
Tydeus; Pelides, the son of Pelius; Fitz- 
william, the son of William; Williamson, 
the son of WilHam; Pavlovitch, the son of 
Paul; MacDonald, the son of Donald. The 



SWEDEN 



203 



Swedish patronymics are derived by add- named Peter Hansson would have as 
ing the ending son to the father's given their surname Petersson, while his girls 
name. For instance the sons of a man would be Petersdotter or daughter. 



Administrative Districts 


(Counties) 


of Sweden (Sve 


rige) are called Lans as 


follows: 








Lan 


Map 


Administrative 


Landskap 


(County) 


Index 


Center 


(Province) 


1 Malmohus 


E2 


Malmo 


Skane 


2 Kristianstad 


E2 


Kristianstad 


Skdne 


3 Blekinge 


E2 


Karlskrona 


Blekinge 


4 Kronoberg 


E2 


VSxjo 


Smaland 


5 Halland 


E2 


Halmstad 


Halland 


6 Jonkoping 


E2 


Jonkoping 


Smaland 


7 Kalmar 


E2 


Kalmar 


Smaland 


8 Gotland 


E3 


Visby 


Gotland 


9 Alvsborg 


D2 


Vanersborg 


Vastergotland 


10 G'oteborg och Bohus 


D2 


Goteborg 


Bohuslan 


11 Skaraborg 


D2 


Mariestad 


Vastergotland 


12 Gstergbtland 


D2 


Linkoping 


Ostergotland 


13 Sodermanland 


D2 


Nykoping 


Sodermanland 


14 Orebro 


D2 


Orebro 


Narke 


15 Varmland 


D2 


Karlstad 


Varmland 


16 Vastmanland 


D2 


Vasteras 


Vastermanland 


17 Stockholm 


D3 


♦Stockholm 


Sodermanland 


18 Uppsala 


D3 


Uppsala 


Uppland 


19 Kopparberg 


D2 


Falun 


Dalarna 


20 Gavleborg 


C2 


Gavle 


Gastrikland 


21 Jamtland 


C2 


Ostersund 


. Jamtland 


22 Vasternorrland 


C3 


HarnosancJ 


Angermanland 


23 Vasterbotten 


B3 


Umea 


Vasterbotten 


24 Norrbotten 


B3 


Lulea 


Norrbotten 


25 City of Stockholm 


D3 







See Map Page 182 



Switzerland 



Capital, Bern 



Switzerland, anciently known as Hel- 
vetia, covers an area about half as 
large as South Carolina, and into that 
little space is crowded a population 
twice that of South Carolina plus half 
a million. The population 4,700,297, as 
compared to South Carolina's 2,117, 027. 
Switzerland is surrounded by France, 
Germany, Austria, and Italy. Languag- 
es represented are German, French, 
Italian, and Romansch. 

Switzerland consists of twenty-two 
states or cantons which form the Swiss 
Republic. For administrative purposes 
three cantons, Appenzell, Basel, and Un- 
terwalden, have been divided into two 
districts each. The cantons are Aargau, 
Appenzell, Basselland, Bern, Fribourg, 
Geneve, Glarus, Grisons, Luzern, Neu- 
chatel, St. Gallen, Schaffhausen, Schwyz. 
Solothurn, Thurgau, Ticino, Unterwald- 
en, Uri, Valais, Vaud, Zug, and Zurich. 



Among the available genealogical 
sources are the church or parish reg- 
isters, the baptismal, the confirmation, 
the marriage, and the death books. The 
confirmation books contain the names 
and records of the fifteen-year-old boys 
and girls who have prepared themselves 
in special study groups under the direc- 
tion of the minister prior to their partici- 
pation for the first time in the Lord's 
Supper. Among the non-church records 
are the Burger Rodel (Citizen Roll) in 
which is recorded the name of each citi- 
zen, together with his parents' and 
grandparents' names, and the Zivilstand- 
samt (civilian position), containing about 
the same information. 

Of the many European nationalities 
represented in Utah, none has been more 
consistent and energetic in their re- 
search activities than have the Swiss. 



204 THIRD EDITION OF THE HANDY BOOK FOR GENEALOGISTS 



Cantons of Switzerland 



B 



D 




GRAUBUNDEN 



« Chur 






.^^ 



gK^ 



.^^ 



ZlJRICH 
ZUrich^ 

AARGAU 
Aai 



Glarus 



SCHWYZ 
Schwyz 



^Itdorf 
URI 



Luzern 



•Sarnen^ 

UNTHRWAL- 



LUZERN 



iTiestal 



'% 



• Bern 



:jj^ 



\ 



•Fribourg 
FRIBOURG 



^^ 



Bellinzona* 



TICI^D 



VALIS 



SWITZERLAND 



203 



As a result voluminous records have 
been filed with the Genealogical Society 
of Utah. For instance, one woman has 
over the years gathered more than 
60,000 names of ancestors, all of whom 
have been thoroughly identified. Sev- 
eral records go back as far as 1520. 



People of Swiss descent, regardless 
of their present residence, may do well 
to confer with the Genealogical Society 
of Utah, 80 North Main Street, Salt 
Lake City 1, Utah, about their research 
activities before engaging a professional 
researcher. 



Wales 



For nearly five hundred years Eng- 
land and Wales have been one country. 
The Welsh government affairs have 
been conducted in London just as those 
of England. In everything else the two 
peoples are entirely different. The 
Welsh, or Cymry, have their own tra- 
ditions, history, language, literature, and 
songs. 

"English and Welsh records were com- 
piled under the same condition^ and 
laws," says David E. Gardner, an un- 
tiring Utah student and teacher of gen- 
ealogy. "This means that parish regis- 
ters, probate court wills and administra- 
tions, and civil registering of vital sta- 
tistics (since 1837), taxing, militia re- 
cords, and overseeng of the poor and 
highways were practically the same." 

Mr. Gardner explains that the lang- 
uage is so difficult that names of days, 
months, and counties often are mistaken 
for places of birth. Spelling of names 
is not always uniform. To add to the 
difficulty of interpreting the old records, 
some of the parish vicars or ministers 
have interchanged Latin and English. 

Since many of the surnames were 
taken from the place of residence, you 
will find many families with the same 



name who are unrelated. 

The patronymics (father's name) 
changed with each generation just as 
in the Scandinavian countries. Until 
1850 these changes were common in all 
families. So, for instance, John son 
Philip Thomas, is the same as John ap 
Philip Thomas, which becomes John 
Philip, or David ab Evan Hugh, becomes 
David Evan or David Bevan. 

The only legal form of marriage from 
1754 to 1837 was by the parish minister. 
If births and burials are not found in 
parish register, search nonrparbchial 
registers, many of which, prior to 1837, 
are at Somerset House. 

Because of the changes of names and 
frequency of common names, wills may 
give the only real identification. 

Wills and administrations are grouped 
into four probate courts: (1) Llandaff 
(South Wales and Monmouth); (2) St. 
David's (West Wales); (3) Bangor (Cen- 
tral and Northwest Wales); (4) St. 
Asaph (Northwest Wales). All names in 
the records are indexed under the first 
given name. 

Unless the researcher is well acquaint- 
ed with the Welsh language, it may be 
to his advantage to employ a Welsh 
professional researcher. 



Counties of Wales 







Map 




Name 


Abbreviation 


Index 


County Town 


Anglesey 


Ang. 


C5 


Beaurnares 


Brecknockshire 


Brec. 


D7 


Brecknock or Brecon 


Caernarvonshire (Carnarvon) 


Caern. 


C6 


Caernarvon 


Cardiganshire 


Card. 


C7 


Cardigan 


Carmarthenshire 


Carm. 


C7 


Carmarthen 


Denbighshire 


Denb. 


D5 


Denbigh 


Flintshire 


Flint. 


D5 


Flint 


Glamorganshire 


Glam. 


D8 


Cardiff 


Merionethshire 


Meri. 


D6 


Dolgelly 


Montgomeryshire 


Mont. 


D6 


Montgomery 


Pembrokeshire 


Pemb. 


C7 


Pembroke 


Radnorshire 


Rad. 


D7 


New Radnor 



See Map Page 188 



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